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2021-06-15T16:02:14Z
Lamu County Integrated Development Plan, Kenya 2018.pdf
Mariam:

LAMU COUNTY INTEGRATED

DEVELOPMENT PLAN

2018 - 2022


September 2018


County Integrated Development Plan,

2018 - 2022


Prepared by:

The Department of Finance, Strategy & Economic

Planning

P.O. Box 74 - 80500 Lamu, Kenya

Email: treasury@lamu.go.ke

Website: www.lamucounty.go.ke


Telephone: 0772 576 122/ 0715 555 111


© County Government of Lamu, 2018


mailto:treasury@lamu.go.ke


i

The County Government of Lamu

Vision Statement

A nationally competitive county offering good quality life for all its citizens through prudent

use of resources, equitable provision of services and implementation of sustainable

development.


Mission Statement

To provide services and ensure socio –economic development of the people of Lamu County

through prudent utilization of resources and implementation of projects and programmees.


Core Values

Public Participation The county will be encourage and enhance public

participation especially during preparation of medium and

long term county development plans, annual budget and

during review of project performance. Community decisions

will be critical in shaping tehe county’s development agenda.

Social Inclusion The county will encourage inclusion of all members of the

community including: the poor, men, women, physically

challenged, youth, vulnerable and marginalized groups.

Equity All community members including the most vulnerable, the

poor, the women, People with Disability and youth will be

enjoy equal opportunities and rights.

Integrity,Accountability

and Transparency

The county will uphold the virtues of integrity,

accountability, transparency and honesty in all county

development activities to promote trust, understanding and

harmony.

Prudence All county resources will be used efficiently, wisely and

carefully to minimize loss and wastage. The county will

strive to ensure that projects are nvironmentally sustainable,

friendly and beneficial to both present and future generations.

Sustainability The county will support projects with potential for long term

continuation and of benefits to communities.


ii

Table of Contents

List of Tables vi
Abbreviations and Acronyms ................................................................................................ viii
Glossary of Commonly Used Terms.......................................................................................... x
Foreword ................................................................................................................................. xiv
Acknowledgement .................................................................................................................. xvi
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................. xviii


CHAPTER 1: COUNTY GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................... 1
1.1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1
1.2 Position and Size .............................................................................................................. 1
1.3 Physiographic and Natural Conditions ............................................................................. 2
1.3.1 Physical and Topographic features ................................................................................... 2
1.3.2 Ecological conditions ....................................................................................................... 3
1.3.3 Climatic conditions ........................................................................................................... 4
1.4 Administrative and Political Units .................................................................................... 5
1.4.1 Administrative Units ........................................................................................................ 5
1.4.2 Political units .................................................................................................................... 7
1.5 Demographic Features ...................................................................................................... 8

1.5.1 Population size and composition ........................................................................... 8
1.5.2 Urban population .................................................................................................. 11
1.5.3 Population Density and Distribution .................................................................... 12
1.5.4 Demographic Dividend ........................................................................................ 12

1.6 Human Development Approach ..................................................................................... 13
1.6.1 Human Development Index ........................................................................................... 14
1.6.2. The Gender Inequality Index (GII) ................................................................................. 14
1.7 Infrastructure and Access ................................................................................................ 15
1.7.1 Road Transport ( Network & Distribution) .................................................................... 15

1.7.1.1 Sea Transport .................................................................................................... 16

1.7.1.2 Air Transport ..................................................................................................... 17

1.7.2. Post And Telecommunications:Post Office, Mobile Telephony, Landline ............. 19
1.7.3. Energy and Access ......................................................................................................... 19
1.7.3 Markets and Urban Centres ........................................................................................... 20
1.7.4 Housing........................................................................................................................... 20

1.7.4.1 Housing Density................................................................................................. 21

1.8 Land and Land Use ......................................................................................................... 21
1.8.1 Land Ownership categories/classification ..................................................................... 21
1.8.2 Mean Holding Size ........................................................................................................ 21
1.8.3 Percentage of land with title deeds ............................................................................... 21
1.8.4 Incidence of Landlessness ............................................................................................. 21
1.9 Wage Earners .................................................................................................................. 21
1.9.1 Self Employed ............................................................................................................... 22
1.9.2 Labour force ................................................................................................................... 22
1.9.3 Unemployment level ...................................................................................................... 22
1.10 Irrigation infrastructure and schemes............................................................................ 22
1.10.1 Irrigation Potential ................................................................................................... 22
1.10.2 Irrigation Schemes (small/ large scale) .................................................................... 23


iii

1.11 Crop, Livestock, Fish Production and Value addition ................................................. 23
1.11.1 Crops Production ..................................................................................................... 23
1.11.2 Acreage Under Food and Cash Crops ...................................................................... 25
1.11.3 Average Farm Sizes ................................................................................................. 26
1.11.4 Main Storage Facilities ............................................................................................ 26
1.11.5 Agricultural Extension, Training, Research and Information Services ................... 26
1.11.6 Farm Input and Credit Accessibility ........................................................................ 27
1.11.7 Agricultural Markets and Products .......................................................................... 27
1.11.8 Sustainable Land Use Practices .............................................................................. 28
1.11.9 Main livestock breeds and facilities ......................................................................... 28
1.11.10 Ranching .................................................................................................................. 28
1.12 Forestry, Agro Forestry and Value addition ................................................................. 28
1.12.1 Main Forest types and size of forests (Gazetted and Un-gazetted forests) .............. 28
1.12.2 Main forest products ................................................................................................ 29
1.12.3 Agro forestry ............................................................................................................ 30
1.13 Financial services ......................................................................................................... 30
1.13.1 Number of banks, Micro finance institutions, mobile money agents and SACCOs

with FOSAs .................................................................................................................... 30
1.14 Environment and Climate Change ................................................................................ 31
1.14.1 Major degraded areas/ hotspots and major contribution to environmental

degradation ..................................................................................................................... 31
1.14.2 Environmental threat (loss of biodiversity, drought, floods, deforestation,

landslides, coastal and marine pollution, emergence of marine related diseases and

epidemic, invasive species .............................................................................................. 31
1.14.3 High spatial and temporal variability of rainfall ...................................................... 31
1.14.4 Change in water levels ............................................................................................ 32
1.14.5 Solid waste management facilities ........................................................................... 32
1.15 Water and Sanitation .................................................................................................... 32
1.15.1 Hydrology and Geology ........................................................................................... 32
1.15.2 Water Resources ...................................................................................................... 33
1.15.3 Water Supply Schemes ............................................................................................ 33
1.15.3 Water Sources and Access ....................................................................................... 33
1.15.4 Water Management .................................................................................................. 34
1.15.5 Sanitation ................................................................................................................. 34
1.16 Health Access and Nutrition ......................................................................................... 34
1.16.1 Access to Health Services ........................................................................................ 34

1.16.2 Morbidity: Five most Common Diseases in Order of Prevalence ....................... 35

1.16.3 Nutrition Status ........................................................................................................ 36
1.16.4 Immunization Coverage ........................................................................................... 36
1.16.5 Access and Utilization of Reproductive Health Services ........................................ 36
1.16.6 Health Information Systems .................................................................................... 37
1.17 Education, Skills, Literacy and Infrastructure .............................................................. 37
1.17.1 Pre- School Education (Early Childhood Development Education)........................ 37
1.17.2 Primary Education ................................................................................................... 38
1.17.3 Non formal Education .............................................................................................. 40
1.17.4 Vocational Training Centres .................................................................................... 40
1.17.5 Secondary Education ............................................................................................... 41
1.17.6 Tertiary Education ................................................................................................... 41


iv

1.17.7 Adult and continuing Education .............................................................................. 42
1.17.8 Quranic schools & Madrasa ..................................................................................... 42
1.18 Talent Academies.......................................................................................................... 42
1.19 Sports facilities.............................................................................................................. 43
1.20 Public Benefits Organizations....................................................................................... 43
1.20.1 Non-Governmental Organizations ........................................................................... 43
1.20.2 Self Help, Women and Youth Groups ..................................................................... 43

1.21 Development Partners .......................................................................................... 43

CHAPTER 2: LINKAGES WITH VISION 2030 AND OTHER PLANS.............................. 44
2.1 ‘Introduction .................................................................................................................. 44
2.2 CIDP Linkage with the Kenya Vision 2030 and Medium Term Plan ........................... 44
2.3 CIDP Alignment with 2010 Constitution of Kenya ....................................................... 45
2.4 CIDP Alignment to Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), 2012 .......................... 46
2.5 CIDP Alignment to Intergovernmental Relations Act, 2012 ......................................... 46
2.6 CIDP Link to County Government Act (2012).............................................................. 47
2.7 CIDP Alignment with National Government Big Four .................................................. 47
2.8 CIDP linkage with the New Government Manifesto/Policy........................................... 48
2.9 CIDP Linkage with SDGs ................................................................................................ 2
2.10 CIDP Alignment with Agenda 2063 ............................................................................ 11
2.11 Jumuiya ya Kaunti za Pwani (JKP) .............................................................................. 58
2.11 Frontier Counties Development Council ........................................................................ 58
2.12 Lamu Port Investment Framework ................................................................................. 58
2.13 LAPSSET Programme and its Impact on Future of Lamu County ................................ 59
CHAPTER 3: REVIEW OF CIDP I IMPLEMENTATION ................................................... 60
3.2 Status of Implementation of the Previous CIDP ............................................................ 61
3.2.1 County Revenue Streams ............................................................................................... 61

3.2.1.1 Equitable Share .................................................................................................. 61

3.2.1.2 Own Source Revenue ......................................................................................... 61

3.3 County Expenditure Analysis ......................................................................................... 58
3.3 Summary of Key Achievements ..................................................................................... 59
3.4 Challenges Experienced ................................................................................................. 64


CHAPTER 4: COUNTY DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES AND STRATEGIES .................. 65
4.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................... 65
4.2 Spatial Development Framework ................................................................................... 65
4.3 Natural Resource Assessment ........................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.
4.4 Development Priorities and Strategies ........................................................................... 65
4.4.1 Agriculture, Rural and Urban Development ................................................................... 65

4.4.1.1 Agriculture Sub-sector ....................................................................................... 66

4.4.1.2 Fisheries Sub-sector ........................................................................................... 66

4.4.1.3 Livestock Sub-sector .......................................................................................... 67

4.4.1.4 Veterinary Sub-sector ........................................................................................ 67

Fisheries Sub-Sector .................................................................................................................................................. 76

4.4.2 Lands, Physical Planning and Urban Development Sub-sector ..................................... 83
4.4.3 Infrastructure, Energy & ICT ......................................................................................... 95
4.4.4 General Economic and Commercial Affairs ................................................................ 102


v

4.4.5 Health Sector ................................................................................................................ 119
4.4.6 Education ..................................................................................................................... 126
4.4.7 Social Protection, Culture and Recreation .................................................................... 140
4.4.8 Sanitation, Environmental Protection, Water And Natural Resources ......................... 147
4.5 Flagship /County Transformative Projects .................................................................. 160
4.5.1 Agriculture Sector ........................................................................................................ 160
4.5.2 Livestock production Sub-sector .................................................................................. 161
4.5.3 Veterinary Sub-sector ................................................................................................... 161
4.5.4 Land sub-sector ............................................................................................................ 162
4.5.5 Fisheries sub-sector ...................................................................................................... 163
4.5.6 Infrastructure ................................................................................................................ 163
4.5.7 Trade ............................................................................................................................. 164
4.5.8 Tourism......................................................................................................................... 164
4.5.9 Health ........................................................................................................................... 166
4.5.10 Sanitation, Environmental Protection, Water and Natural Resources ................... 168
4.5.11 Education ............................................................................................................... 169
4.5.12 Gender, Youth Affairs and Social Services ........................................................... 169
4.5.13 Sports ..................................................................................................................... 170
4.5.14 Culture.................................................................................................................... 170


CHAPTER 5: IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK ......................................................... 188
5.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 188
5.2 Ward Development Projects Initiative ......................................................................... 188
5.3 Institutional Framework ............................................................................................... 188
5.4 Stakeholders in the County .............................................................................................. 101
5.5 Resource Requirements by Sector ................................................................................... 102
5.7 Estimated Resource Gap and Measures of Addressing It ................................................ 108


CHAPTER 6: MONITORING AND EVALUATION FRAMEWORK ............................... 110
6.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 110
6.2 Data collection, Analysis and Reporting ...................................................................... 110
6.3 Monitoring and Evaluation Report Mechanism ............................................................... 111
6.4 Summary of M&E Outcome indicators Agriculture, Rural and Urban Development . 112

6.4.1 Agriculture Sub-sector ....................................................................................... 112

5.4.2 Livestock production Sub-sector ....................................................................... 115

5.4.3 Veterinary Sub-sector ........................................................................................ 117

5.4.4 Fisheries Sub-sector ........................................................................................... 118

5.4.5 120

5.4.6 Land Sub-sector ................................................................................................. 120

6.5 Sector 2: ICT, Energy & Infrastructure ....................................................................... 122
6.6 SECTOR: General Economic and Commercial Affairs .............................................. 124
6.7 Sector: Health .............................................................................................................. 128
6.8 SECTOR: Social Protection, Culture and Recreation ................................................. 132

6.8.1 Social Protection, Culture And Recreation Sector ............................................. 132


vi


List of Tables


Table 1: Administrative Units in Lamu County ........................................................................ 6

Table 2: Area by Sub County and Wards .................................................................................. 7

Table 3: Population projection by Age Cohort .......................................................................... 9

Table 4: Population projections for selected age groups ......................................................... 10

Table 5: Population projection by Urban Centre ..................................................................... 11

Table 6: Projected population densities by Sub County .......................................................... 12

Table 7: People living with disabilities by type, sex and age .. Error! Bookmark not defined.

Table 8: Demographic Dividend Potential .............................................................................. 13

Table 9: Production levels for both of bothfood and cash crops ............................................. 23

Table 10: Value in '000 KShs for both food and cash crops .................................................... 24

Table 11: Acreages under food and cash crops ....................................................................... 25

Table 12: Financial institutions in Lamu County ................................................................... 30

Table 13: Water respurces in the county.................................................................................. 33

Table 14: Water Supply Soucres in the County ....................................................................... 33

Table 15: Water Sources and Access in the County ................................................................ 33

Table 16: ECDE Enrollement and Enrollment Rates by County ............................................. 37

Table 17: ECDE Enrollment by Public and Private Schools ................................................... 37

Table 18: Public ECDE Enrolment by Levels and Gender ...................................................... 38

Table 19: Private ECDE Enrolment by Levels and Gender .................................................... 38

Table 20: Primary schools and average school size................................................................. 38

Table 21: Number of schools by accommodation category ..................................................... 39

Table 22: Number of Schools by Gender ................................................................................ 39

Table 23: Primary and Enrollment Rates ................................................................................. 39

Table 24: Primary Share of Private Enrollment ....................................................................... 39

Table 25: Total Primary Enrollment by Residence.................................................................. 39

Table 26: Public Primary Enrollment by Residence ................................................................ 40

Table 27: ECDE Teachers ....................................................................................................... 40

Table 28: ECDE Pupil Teacher Ratio ...................................................................................... 40

Table 29: CIDP linkages with the Kenya vision 2030. ............................................................ 44

Table 30: County Spatial Development Strategies by Thematic Areas . Error! Bookmark

not defined.

Table 31: Natural Resource Assessment .............................. Error! Bookmark not defined.

Table 32: Cross-sectoral impacts ........................................................................................ 117

Table 33: Cross-sectoral impacts ........................................................................................... 125

Table 34: Role of Stakeholders in CIDP Development & Implementation........................... 101

Table 35: HEALTH SECTOR ................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.

Table 36: SOCIAL PROTECTION, CULTURE AND RECREATION SECTOR .............. 132

Table 37: Environmental protection, Water and Natural Resources ..................................... 136


vii

Table 38: Public Administration and Inter-governmental Relations/ Governance, Justice, Law

and Order SECTOR ............................................................................................................... 140

Table 39: New Project Proposals ........................................................................................ 224

Table 40: Stalled Projects ...................................................................................................... 287

Table 41: Stalled Projects/programmes ................................................................................. 298

Table 42: On-going projects .................................................................................................. 298

Table 43: Stalled Projects ...................................................................................................... 326

Table 44: On-going projects ................................................................................................ 327

Table 45: New Project Proposals ........................................................................................ 328


Figure 2: Lamu County Map...................................................................................................... 2

Figure 3: Spatial distribution of agro-ecological zones in Lamu county ................................... 4

Figure 4: Administrative units in Lamu County ........................................................................ 7

Figure 5: Spatial location of the Agro ecological zones ............................................................ 8

Figure 6: Map showing the disctribution of public health facilities in the County ................. 34


viii


Abbreviations and Acronyms

ADP Annual Development Plan

AGPO Access to Government Procurement Opportunities

AI Artificial Insemination

AMS Agricultural Mechanization Services

APDK Association for the Physically Disabled of Kenya

ATC Agricultural Training Centre

BPO Business Process Outsourcing

CBS County Bureau of Statistics

CDLD County Director of Livestock Development

CECM County Executive Committee Member

CoG Council of Governors

CGL County Government of Lamu

CIDP County Integrated Development Plan

CRA Commission on Revenue Allocation

DMS Debt Management Strategies

ECDE Early Childhood Education

EMU Efficiency Monitoring Unit

FKF Football Kenya Federation

FY Financial Year

GDP Gross Domestic Product

GIS Geographical Information System

HRH Human Resource for Health

ICT Information and Communication Technology

ICTA Information and Communication Technology Authority

IFMIS Integrated Financial Management System

KICOSCA Kenya Inter-Counties Sports and Culture Association

KLRC Kinoru livestock resource centre

KRB Kenya Roads Board

KERRA Kenya Rural Roads Authority

KENHA Kenya National Highway Authority

KURA Kenya Urban Roads Authority


ix

LAPSSET Lamu Port Southern Sudan Ethiopia Transport

LCADCB LAMU County Alcoholic Drinks Control Board

MDGs Millennium Development Goals

LAWASSO LAMU Water and Sewerage Services

LIDC LAMU Investment and Development Corporation

MTDMS Medim Term Debt Management Strategy

MTEF Medium Term Expenditure Framework

MTP Medium Term Plan

LTRH LAMU Teaching & Referral Hospital

LYB Lamu Youth Brigade

NACADA National Authority for the Campaign against Alcohol & Drug Abuse

NDMA National Disaster Management Authority

NCPB National Cereals and Produce Board

NCPD National Council for Population & Development

OVCs Orphans and Vulnerable Children

PESTEL Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental & Legal

PFMA Public Finance Management Act

PSA&L Public, Service and Administration& Legal Affairs

PPP Public Private Partnership

PWDs Persons with Disabilities

SAGAs Semi Autonomous Government Agencies

SDGs Sustainable Development Goals

SWG Sector Working Group

SWOT Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats

UNESCO United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization

WENR Water, Environment and Natural resources

WRMA Water Resource Management Authority

WRUA Water Resource Users Association


x


Glossary of Commonly Used Terms


Term Meaning

Baseline: It is an analysis describing the initial state of an indicator

before the start of a project/programme, against which

progress can be asessed or comparisons made.

County Assembly Public

Service Board

It is a body charged with the responsibility of developing

and implementing human resource policies and framework

for the County Government in line with the relevant laws.

The CPSB handles all human resource issues in the

County.

County Assembly It is the legislative arm of the County Government which

makes laws to govern certain operations. The assembly

also has oversight responsibilities on the county’s

operational activities. The County Assembly consists of

Members of County Assembly (MCAs), Clerk and the

Speaker elected by the Members of the County Assembly

County Budget and Economic

Forum

Comprises the Governor, CEC members, a number of

representatives, not being county public officers, equal to

the number of executive committee members appointed by

the Governor from persons nominated by organizations

representing professionals, business, labour issues,

women, persons with disabilities, the elderly and faith

based groups at the county level. They are a means for

consultation by the county government on preparation

of county plans, the County Fiscal Strategy Paper and

the Budget Review and Outlook Paper for the county and

matters relating to budgeting, the economy and financial

management at the county level

County Executive Consists of the county governor and the deputy county

governor; and members appointed by the county governor,

with the approval of the assembly, from among persons

who are not members of the assembly.

County Government The unit of devolved government

Demographic Dividend the demographic dividend is the accelerated economic

growth that may result from a decline in a country's

mortality and fertility and the subsequent change in the

age structure of the population. It is evident in Kenya that

demographic transition is taking place at both national and

county level creating a demographic window of

opportunity to harness the demographic dividend.

https://roggkenya.org/areas-for-media-coverage-in-good-governance-and-corruption-in-kenya/kenya-county-budget-making/sectoral-plans-annual-development-plan-adp-reports/
https://roggkenya.org/areas-for-media-coverage-in-good-governance-and-corruption-in-kenya/kenya-county-budget-making/kenya-county-fiscal-strategy-paper-cfsp/
https://roggkenya.org/areas-for-media-coverage-in-good-governance-and-corruption-in-kenya/kenya-county-budget-making/budget-review-and-outlook-paper/


xi

Term Meaning

Development Committee An independent focus group centered on development and

discussion of policies, guidelines, and processes by

providing valuable input for development and planning.

Development The process of economic and social transformation that is

based on complex cultural and environmental factors and

their interactions.

Devolution The statutory delegation of powers from the central

government of a sovereign state to governat a subnational

level, such a regional or local level. Devolution in Kenya

is the pillar of the Constitution and seeks to bring

government closer to the people, with county governments

at the centre of dispersing political power and economic

resources to Kenyans at the grassroots.

Flagship/Transformative

Projects

These are projects with high impact in terms of

employment creation, increasing county competitiveness,

revenue generation etc. They may be derived from the

Kenya Vision 2030 and its MTPs or the County

Transformative Agenda.

Government Is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as

a mechanism for determining the policy.

Green Economy Is defined as an economy that aims at reducing

environmental risks and ecological scarcities, and that

aims for sustainable development without degrading the

environment. Green economy considerations are

envisaged by mainstreaming cross-cutting issues such as

climate change; Environmental degradation; HIV/AIDs;

Gender, Youth and Persons with Disability (PWD);

Disaster Risk Management (DRM), Ending Drought

Emergencies (EDE) among others.

Human Development Index

(HDI):

It is a composite measure that incorporates mostly

indicators derived from social sectors like life expectancy,

years of schooling, and the general standard of living in

the region or country.

Indicator An indicator is a sign of progress /change that result from

your project. It measures a change in a situation or

condition and confirms progress towards achievement of a

specific result. It is used to measure a project impact,

outcomes, outputs and inputs that are monitored during

project implementation to assess progress

Integration Combining or coordinating separate county programmes

and projects to provide a harmonious, interrelated plan in

an organized or structured manner to form a

constituent unit that function cooperatively

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statutory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_government
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_government
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Policy


xii

Term Meaning

Outcome Indicator This is a specific, observable, and measurable

characteristic or change that will represent achievement of

the outcome. Outcome indicators include quantitative and

qualitative measures. Examples: enrolment rates,

transition rates, mortality rates etc.

Outcome Measures the intermediate results generated relative to the

objective of the intervention. It describes the actual

change in conditions/situation as a result of an

intervention output(s) such as changed practices as a result

of a programme or project.

Output Immediate result from conducting an activity i.e. goods

and services produced.

Performance indicator A measurement that evaluates the success of an

organization or of a particular activity (such as projects,

programs, products and other initiatives) in which it

engages.

Programme A grouping of similar projects and/or services performed

by a Ministry or Department to achieve a specific

objective; The Programmes must be mapped to strategic

objectives.

Project


A project is a set of coordinated activities implemented to

meet specific objectives within defined time, cost and

performance parameters. Projects aimed at achieving a

common goal form a programme.

Public Participation


An action or a series of actions a person takes to involve

themselves in affairs of government or community that

directly engages the public in decision-making and gives

full consideration to public input in making that decision.

These activities include voting, attending meetings,

participating in public or private political discussion or

debate on issues, signing a petition on a desired

government action or policy, volunteering in community

activities and contributing money to a political party or

candidate of one’s choice among other similar activities.

Spatial Development


These are techniques used by planners and other actors of

decision making to facilitate integrated balanced

development.

Target It is a planned level of an indicator achievement


xiii


xiv


Foreword

The unveiling of the Lamu County Integrated Development

Plan (CIDP) for 2018 - 2022 is a historic milestone in our

county’s development pathway. It represents a strategic

effort by the County Government of Lamu to drive its

development agenda and spur overall economic growth.

The spirit of this CIDP borrows heavily from the Country’s

development blueprint - the Vision 2030, the African Union

Agenda 2063, the East African Vision 2050 and it also

builds on the experiences, successes and lessons learned

during the implementation of the first CIDP (2013 – 2017).

To maximize our county’s economic growth our Plan is

aligned to take advantage of the region’s economic

strategies embodied in the Vision 2030 such as the projects

affiliated to the Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia-Transport

(LAPPSET) Corridor. The plan is also well anchored and

closely linked to the Sustainable Development Goals

(SDGs), the Lamu County Spatial Plan as well as an other

sectoral plans that exist at both the county and national

level.


Interesting in the 2018 - 2022 CIDP, are new programs comprising the priority infrastructure

projects such as the xxx km of road and bridges as well as 150 km of street light. These

investments are designed to: create high quality and well-connected places that provide Lamu

residents with a most conducive environment to live, work, play and learn. The investments

will also accelerate business growth by connecting existing and new enterprises to County

resources for commercialization, and development of products to new and growing markets.

Alongside these programs are a number of life changing flagship projects that will spur

economic growth and open up employment opportunities for most of our youths. The

flagship project for the county includes among others universal health care coverage for

20,000 households, digitization of all health facilities in the county, promoting food security

through enhanced investment in irrigated ate agriculture and overall infrastructure

development among others. Worth mentioning is the strategic location of these projects to

ensure that every Ward has aspiration to look forward to within the next five years of my

government.


The CIDP adopts a programme based planning approach to enhance allocation of resources to

related activities with a view to accelerate the desired growth by linking specific sectoral

programmes to well defined targets and outcomes for the planning period. This approach will

not only provide a mechanism for assessing the effectiveness and efficiency in the allocation

of financial resources but will also enable the measuring of the output and outcomes of the

defined programmes/projects at the end of the implementation phase. As such, we will seek

to measure “who” received “what” kind of investment, “where” it was invested and the

targeted beneficiary.


xv

With the devolved units coming to terms with their new set of responsibilities, the

preparation of the CIDP occurred within the context of newly found traction and experience

which allowed the county to crystallize its economic and development strategy in a more

practical way. Unlike the first Plan, the CIDP 2018 - 2022 was creatively developed with

significant input by our own technical teams with support from external consultants. This in

itself is an indicator of progress and developed human resource capacity.


The County Government of Lamu takes cognizance of the fact that economic development

requires strong partnership with other players in order to make significant impact As such in

order to determine our ultimate success, we will need to build a strong framework that

integrates the public-private-Non-profit sectors. In this framework, the public sector will

focus on creating an enabling environment for economic growth and filling market gaps with

programs for the general welfare of its citizens. The private sector on the other hand will

create economic value that supports job creation while the Non-profit sector will create

knowledge and provide resources thus creating social value.


Last but not least, I thank the people of Lamu, our development partners, technical teams and

the elected leaders whose inputs made this Plan a reality.


Fahim Yassin Twaha

Governor, Lamu County


xvi

Acknowledgement

Drawing from the rich experience of executing the

first Lamu County Integrated Development Plan

(CIDP 2013 - 2017), a lot of effort has now been

put in formulating an ambitious but realistic Plan

that better captures the needs and aspirations of the

Lamu community for the next five years. The new

CIDP covering the period 2018 - 2022 is a product

of intensive work and selfless commitment by a

wide range of individuals and organizations.

Foremost, I would like to extend a deep sense of

appreciation to HE Governor, Fahim Twaha

together with the Deputy Governor, HE

Abdulhakim Aboud and the entire team of County

Executive Committee Members for their immense

personal contributions and overall support

accorded during the CIDP development process.


The enabling environment created by the Executive was instrumental in not only engaging

stakeholders effectively in the preparation of the CIDP but also in fast tracking its timely

completion.


Special thanks go to the national Ministry of Devolution and Planning for providing the

guidelines that were instrumental in the preparation of the second generation CIDP. I am

also very grateful to the Office of the County Secretary and the County Administration for

the coordination and timely execution of all the many activities and workshops that led to the

successful completion of the CIDP.


My sincere gratitude goes to the Speaker, the Clerk and all the members of the Lamu County

Assembly, for their deep involvement and active participation in the various public forums

and workshops that were very valuable in enriching the document.


I must admit that this work would not have been possible without the financial and technical

support of USAID - AHADI that was unreservedly offered throughout the entire duration of

the CIDP development process. I sincerely acknowledge their immense contribution and

tireless efforts to ensure successful development and publication of this Plan. I am also

especially indebted to WWF who have been supportive of the CIDP development.


I am very grateful to the Lamu community who contributed immensely in the identification

of priority programmes that reflect our needs and directly contribute to actualizing our dream

of making Lamu a prosperous County.


I wish to pay special tribute to the technical team of professionals and experts working in the

various county departments who provided guidance and leadership in their respective sector

working groups and ensured provision of valuable information that improved the overall

quality of the CIDP.


Finally, I thank the County’s Planning Department for successfully coordinating the various


xvii

departments in planning, compiling and publishing the Plan.


It is impossible to mention everyone, but I do acknowledge all those individuals who directly

or indirectly contributed to the successful development of the CIDP 2018 - 2022.


Ahmed Hemed

COUNTY EXECUTIVE MEMBER

FINANCE, STRATEGY & ECONOMIC PLANNING


xviii

Executive Summary

County Government Act, 2012, Section 104, obligated counties to develop County Integrated

Development Plans (CIDPs) and setting up of planning units in all county administrative

levels. In fulfillment of this requirements, the County Government of Lamu is pleased to

present the CIDP for the planning period 2018 – 2022. As required by law, and through an

aggressive public participation process, the lamu community was engaged in 50 different

foras held at both the village and ward level. Through this process, the Lamu CIDP 2018 -

2022 represents the views, aspiration, priorities and needs of the Lamu County community.

In addition, extensive stakeholder consultation and involvement was done in a highly

participatory manner which further shaped the identified development priorities, strategies

and programmes.


The CIDP 2018 - 2022 provides a good platform for strengthening the linkage between

policy, planning and budgeting process. As such it consolidates the efforts of the national

government and other relevant public institutions with those at the local level to bring

meaningful, social, environmental, and economic development that is of benefit of local

communities. Due to its integrated nature, the plan incorporates and highlights the linkage

with the national development blue print - Vision 2030 and its related Medium Term Plan,

Sustainable Development Goals , Agenda 2063, the National Spatial Plan 2015–2045,

Sustainable Development Goals, Lamu County spartial plan including other sectoral plans

that exists at both the national and county level. The plan also captures how emerging

international obligations and development concepts meant to spur economic development are

embraced during this planning period The specific details of how the county links will all the

existing plans is outlined in Chapter two.


Chapter three of the plan for the period 2018 - 2022 provides for the review of the

implementation of the previous CIDP where highlights of key achievements, challenges

experienced and lessons learned are outlined. More specifically, a total of KShs 12.8 Billion

was spent in implementing the CIDP of which 37 percent was spent on development while 63

perent was spent on recurrent expenditures. In the said planning period, the priority

programmes comprised agriculture, health and infrastructure which were allocated 20%, 15%

and 40% of the total budget respectively. Great strides was also made in promotion of Erly

Childhood Education (ECD) where a total of 63 cnters were constructed county wide and xxx

students are now enjoying improved access to elementary educations services. In a bid to

aimprove access to social services, huge investment were also made in areas such as

agricultural development extension services were provided to over 40,000 farmers and

mechanization promoted through procurement and utilization of 15 tractors, 3 trailers and 15

ploughs. Establishment of county administrative unit was also given priority with a total of

10 ward administrative units constructed and operationalized. In an attempt to strengthen the

County staff capacity, a total of 437 staff (224 males and 213 females) were engaged to serve

in the different departments and units. In general terms the County Government of Lamu

made some significant strides towards economic development and there ares several success

stories that have been captured in the CIDP for the period 2018-2022 for replication and

upscaling.


IN general terms, Chapter four of the CIDP 2018 - 2022 gives an in-depth analysis of the

sector specific development priorities, programmes, projects and strategies as identified by

stakeholders in the county through an all-inclusive participatory process. The chapter

discusses spatial development framework in Lamu County. Chapter five provides a


xix

framework through which the plan will be implemented and discusses the institutions

responsible for the actualization of the plan. The chapter also outlines the resources allocated

for capital projects and describes strategies for raising the revenue gap which include among

others strategies to expand the revenue generation, resource sharing with the national

government, means of attracting external funding.


Finally, Chapter six which is the last in the CIDP 2018 - 2022, outlines the monitoring and

evaluation framework that will be used to track progress made in the implementation of

projects and programmes. It also shows a proposed monitoring and evaluation structure to be

used monitoring and evaluation of projects and programmes. The chapter also highlights the

key objectively verifiable indicators that will be used to monitor and evaluate the level of

performance.


1


CHAPTER 1: COUNTY GENERAL INFORMATION


1.1 Introduction


The Chapter provides a highlight of the county, situation analysis and resource endowment. It

also provides a description of the County with a highlight on its history, inhabitants, location,

size, physiographic and natural conditions, demographic profiles as well as the administrative

and political units. It also provides a description of some of the major economic activities, an

analysis of the current county situation and provides critical background information that has

a bearing on the development of the county.


The chapter also provides an overview of sectoral information including infrastructure and

access; land and land use; community organizations/non-state actors, crop, livestock and fish

production; forestry, environment and climate change; mining; tourism; employment and

other sources of income; water and sanitation; health access and nutrition, education and

literacy, trade, energy, housing, transport and communication, community development and

Social Welfare, public administration and governance.


1.2 Position and Size


Covering an area of approximately 6,607 km2, Lamu County is located on the North coast of

Kenya and is one of the six counties in the coastal region of Kenya. It borders Tana River and

Garrissa counties to the southwest and north respectively. Republic of Somalia is to the

northeast and the Indian Ocean to the south. It lies between latitudes 1o 40’ and 20o 30’ South

and longitude 40o 15’ and 40o 38’ East. The county is divided from the rest of the Country by

an extended and dry zone - the Taru desert.


The County consists of a vast mainland and 65 Islands forming the Lamu archipelago. Of

these Islands, the five major ones that are inhabited include Lamu, Manda, Pate, Kiwayu, and

Ndau. Lamu has a coastaline of approximately 130 km and is renowned for its rich

biodiversity and unique ecosystem that combines both marine and terrestrial wildlife. The

Lamu Archipelago is a significant world ecological and cultural heritage with 75% of

Kenya’s mangrove forests located here. The area has outstanding and endemic marine

biodiversity of diverse coral reefs, sea-grass beds, sand bars, lagoons and creeks that support

a lucrative fishing industry.


Being one of the earliest seaports in East Africa that attracted traders from various parts of

the world. As such the County saw many visitors over its long history including traders and

explorers from Portugal, India, China, Turkey and much of the Middle East whose marks are

still felt in the area contributing to Lamu being recognized as UNESCO world heritage city.

Much of Lamu’s culture is still conserved with arts playing a crucial role in preserving the

rich cultural fabric of Lamu society, from woodcarving and furniture making, to boat

building and jewelry and from calligraphy to poetry.


2


Figure 1: Lamu County Map


1.3 Physiographic and Natural Conditions

1.3.1 Physical and Topographic features

Lamu County is generally flat and lies between altitude zero and 50m above sea level with

the exception of the coastal sand dunes and the Mundane sand hills which hardly exceed 100

m above sea level. The flat topography makes the county prone to flooding during the rainy

seasons and periods of high tides. The flood prone areas include areas around Lake Kenyatta

(Mkungunya) in Bahari Ward, along Tana River delta especially around Moa and Chalaluma

areas in Witu, archipelago islands such as Pate and Manda and areas along the coastal line.

Most disturbing is that, some areas of the County’s mainland such as Mokowe, are below the

sea level as a result of the areas being a limestone karst terrain (NEMA, 2015). The highest

areas of Lamu County are around Samburu Sand Hills (GoK, 1985) and the Boni-Lungi

Forest ecosystem.


The main topographic features found in the county include: the coastal plains, island plains,

Dodori River plain, the Indian Ocean and the sand dunes. The coastal plain, though not

extending to the coastline, creates the best agricultural land in the county. The island plain is

found in the coastal, northern and western parts of the county which have good potential for

agricultural development. The Dodori River plain which is in the Dodori National Reserve is

home to many wildlife species. The Indian Ocean provides a wealthy marine ecosystem

which supports livelihoods of the county mainly through fishing and tourism activities. The

most extensive terrain in Lamu County is the Inland Plain which occupies the northern and


3


western-most part of the County. The inland plain is punctured with seasonal water bodies

being mostly large swampy areas and lake wetlands such as Lake Mkungunya, Lake Amu

and Lake Moa. The County’s coastal plain covers most of the coastline but is interrupted in

some areas by the coastal sand dunes (GoK, 1985).


There are four major catchment areas each with unique characteristics. They are: Dodori,

Coastal zone, Duldul, the Lamu Bay drainage and Tana River catchments. The county has no

permanent river but only few seasonal streams which flow from the west towards the south

eastern part of the county, with none reaching the sea. The only permanent open water site in

the county is Lake Kenyatta in Mpeketoni which has been known to dry during exceptionally

dry years. The county also has several swamp areas occasioned by rain water with the main

ones located in Dodori, BeleBele in Hindi, Ziwa la Magarini, and Chomo Ndogo - Chomo

Kuu along the Hindi-Bargoni road, Luimshi and Kenza on Nairobi Ranch and Kitumbini and

Ziwa la Gorjji in Witu.


1.3.2 Ecological conditions

The different agro-ecological zones in the county are highly influenced by the rainfall

variability patterns experience throughout the County and somehow define the natural

potential of Lamu County. As such the county can be sub divided into two livelihoods zones

with varying economic diversities which are distinct in terms of ecology, infrastructural

network and population distribution. The zones are; the rich agricultural and livestock zones

in the mainland (mainly settlement schemes) and the fishing and marine zones (Islands).

The difference in physiographic, climatic and other natural conditions therefore categorizes

the county into four agro-ecological zones namely Coastal lowland (CL) Coconut-cassava

zone (CL-3), Cashew nut-cassava zone (CL-4), Livestock-millet zone (CL-5) and Lowland

ranching zone (CL-6). The areas under CL-3 and CL-4 are sustainable for agricultural

activities whereas those under CL-5 and CL-6 are suitable for livestock keeping. The Figure

2 shows the spatial distribution of the agro-ecological zones.


4


Figure 2: Spatial distribution of agro-ecological zones in Lamu county


1.3.3 Climatic conditions

The Climate of Lamu County is difficult to describe accurately because there are very few

local recording stations. However, based on the Köppen-Geiger climate classification, Lamu

County can be said to be between the Tropical Monsoon and Arid Steppe Hot climate. The

rainfall pattern in Lamu County is bimodal and is greatly influenced by the Monsoon winds

with the long rains falling between late March and early June with May being the wettest

month. Light showers fall in July and decreasing from August. The short rains come in

November and December decreasing rapidly to a minimum in January and February. January

to March are usually dry months.


The degree of reliability of the short rains decreases from South to North. The amount of

rainfall in the long rains decreases from a strip of about 10km wide from the coastline into

the main land at a rate of about 100mm per kilometre. The short rains increase from the

coastline for the first 10km and then decreases again. The highest average rainfall above

1000mm occurs about 5-20 km inland. It is however interrupted by the Mkunumbi Bay.

Generally, rains in the County are likely to be heavy every 3 or 4 years and relatively light in

the intervening periods. The highest rainfall is recorded around Lake Kenyatta settlement

scheme, Hindi, immediate area surrounding Witu, and the western side of Lamu Island. The

total rainfall recorded range is between 100 mm-1100 mm with . The rest of the County

receives 600 mm - 700 mm with some recording less than 500 mm and these zones are

suitable for development of ranches.


Temperature is usually high ranging from 230 C to 300 C. The mean annual minimum and

maximum temperatures range between 240 C to 340 C. Celsius respectively. The hottest

months are December and April while the coolest months are May and July. The mean

relative humidity in the County is 75%. The total amount of evapo-transpiration is 2,230m

per annum, with the highest values occurring in March and September and the lowest in May.

The high relative humidity levels in Lamu discourage certain development land use aspects


5


as the proposed coal Plant under LAPSSET as the resultant emissions will be absorbed in the

evaporation processes resulting to destructive rains as opposed to productive rains.


1.4 Administrative and Political Units

1.4.1 Administrative Units


Lamu county is composed of has two constituencies compeising the Lamu East and Lamu

West. The county is also made of seven divisions, 23 locations and 39 sub locations as as

shown in Table 1.


6


Table 1: Administrative Units in Lamu County

Sub-

County

Division Land Area

(Km2)

Locations Sub-Locations

Lamu

West

Amu 99.7 Mkomani Mkomani

Langoni Langoni

Matondoni Matondoni

Kipungani

Shela Shela

Hindi 1150.8 Hindi

Magogoni

Hindi

Bargoni

Mokowe Mokowe

KIlimani

Mpeketoni 1727.7 Mpeketoni Kiongwe

Central

Bahari Bahari

Tewe

Mkunumbi Mkunumbi

Mapenya Mapenya

Uziwa

Ndambwe Ndambwe

Hongwe Hongwe

Bomani

Witu 975.4 Witu Witu

Pandanguo

Dide waride Moa

Chalaluma

Lamu East Faza 79.2 Faza Kwafani

Kwatongani

Pate Pate

Siyu Siyu

Shanga

Tchundwa Tchundwa

Kiaingitini 17.7 Kizingitini Pate

Bwajumwali Myabogi

Ndau Ndau

Kiwayuu

Kiunga 2222.6 Kiunga Rubu/Mambore

Mkokoni

Basuba Milimani

Mangai

Mararani

Total 7 6273.1 23 9

Source: Ministry of Interior Coordination and National Government, Lamu County.


7


Figure 3: Administrative units in Lamu County


1.4.2 Political units

As previously stated, Lamu county has two constituencies namely; Lamu West and Lamu

East. Within the two constituencies, there are 10 County Assembly Wards. Of these, Lamu

West constituency has seven wards comprising Sheila, Mkomani, Hindi, Mkunumbi,

Hongwe, Witu and Bahari.while Lamu East with three. Lamu East constituency on the other

hand as County Assembly Wards comprising Faza, Kiunga and Busuba (see Table 2 and

Figure 4)


Table 2: Area by Sub County and Wards

Sub County Wards Land Area (Km2)

Lamu West Shella 54.7

Mkomani 172.5

Hindi 1150.8

Mkunumbi 1366.1

Hongwe 128.5

Bahari 123.3

Witu 975.4

Lamu East Faza 79.2

Basuba 1708.7

Kiunga 513.9

Total 6273.1

Source: Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission, 2013


8


Figure 4: Spatial location of the Agro ecological zones


1.5 Demographic Features

This section presents the County population size and its composition highlighting the specific

age cohorts, urban population, population distribution and density by Sub-county and their

projected population sizes.


1.5.1 Population size and composition

Table 4 provides the county population data based on the 2009 Kenya Pupolation and

Housing Census where there were a total of 101,539 persons comprising 53,045 males (52%)

and 48,494 females (48%). In 2018, it is estimated that the population has increased to a total

of 137,053 persons comprising 71,348 (52%) males and 65,705 (48%) females. Given the

inter-census population growth rate of 3.3%, it is projected to increase to 155,031 by the year

2022 comprising 80,599 (52%) males and 74,432 (48%) females.


9


Table 3: Population projection by Age Cohort

Age

group

2009 (Census) 2018 (Projections) 2020 (Projections) 2022 (Projections)

Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

0-4 8,038 7,681 15,719 10,134 9,684 19,818 10,510 10,047 20,557 10,760 10,286 21,046

5-9 7,375 7,184 14,559 9,553 9,334 18,887 10,124 9,881 20,005 10,504 10,249 20,753

10-14 6,148 5,904 12,052 8,153 7,827 15,980 8,649 8,338 16,987 9,218 8,867 18,085

15-19 5,722 5,095 10,817 7,734 6,693 14,427 8,256 7,146 15,402 8,806 7,659 16,465

20-24 5,020 4,577 9,597 6,861 5,137 11,998 7,247 5,363 12,610 7,780 5,753 13,533

25-29 4,155 3,905 8,060 5,323 5,048 10,371 5,637 5,140 10,777 5,967 5,360 11,327

30-34 3,713 3,125 6,838 4,890 5,001 9,891 5,220 5,380 10,600 5,548 5,461 11,009

35-39 3,070 2,579 5,649 4,262 4,411 8,673 4,516 4,931 9,447 4,862 5,374 10,236

40-44 2,363 1,918 4,281 3,860 3,408 7,268 4,155 3,736 7,891 4,427 4,352 8,779

45-49 1,890 1,644 3,534 2,902 2,557 5,459 3,219 2,851 6,070 3,511 3,208 6,719

50-54 1,522 1,384 2,906 2,207 1,786 3,993 2,394 1,942 4,336 2,760 2,260 5,020

55-59 1,113 927 2,040 1,618 1,417 3,035 1,743 1,502 3,245 1,926 1,665 3,591

60-64 1,051 890 1,941 1,548 1,256 2,804 1,673 1,351 3,024 1,828 1,441 3,269

65-69 583 468 1,051 907 752 1,659 994 821 1,815 1,094 896 1,990

70-74 3,070 2,579 5649 678 642 1,320 727 692 1,419 820 775 1,595

75-79 228 197 425 295 275 570 313 295 608 341 324 665

80+ 478 527 1005 366 457 823 369 456 825 381 482 863

85+ 43 13 56 57 20 77 61 19 80 66 20 86

Total 53,045 48,494 101,539 71,348 65,705 137,053 75,807 69,891 145,698 80,599 74,432 155,031

Source: Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, 2018


The population of the county can be categorized into various age groups which includes the

population under year one, under five, primary school going age, youthful population, female

reproductive age, labour force and aged population.


Under 1 year: The projected number of children under the age of one year in 2009 was 3,175

while in 2018 it stands at 4,285. The population is expected to increase to 4,556 and 4,848 by

2020 and 2022 respectively. The increase in population under the age of one is attributed to

decline in mortality rate (given as 76 per 1000 live births in the county compared to a

national figure of 54 per 1000 live births in 2012) due to enhanced immunization programs

that have been scaled up by the Health sector actors in the county and the country in general.


Under 5 year: The number of children below 5 years in 2009 was 15,719 and it inow stands

at 19,818. It is however expected to increase to 20,557 and 21,046 in 2020 and 2022

respectively. This age group will face various challenges that include; immunization,

protection from malaria and ensuring improved nutritional status. This requires initiating or

scaling up of programmes to addressthe plight of this age group which happens to be the most

vulnerable. There is need to continuously address the health and welfare issues affecting this

age group.


10


Table 4: Population projections for selected age groups

Age group

2009 (Census) 2018 (Projections) 2020 (Projections) 2022 (Projections)

Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Under 1 1,597 1,578 3,175 2,155 2,130 4,285 2,292 2,264 4,556 2,438 2,410 4,848

Under 5 8,038 7,681 15,719 10,134 9,684 19,818 10,512 10,045 20,557 10,762 10,284 21,046

Primary school
Age (6-13)

10,832 10,498 21,330 14,620 14,170 28,790 15,543 15,063 30,606 16,538 16,029 32,567

Secondary

School Age (14-

17)

4,593 4,151 8,744 6,199 5,603 11,802 6,591 5,956 12,547 7,012 6338 13,350

Youth Population

(15-29)
14,897 13,577 28,474 19,251 17,545 36796 20,294 18,495 38,789 21,620 19705 41325

Reproductive
Age –female (15-

49)

- 22,843 22,843 - 32,255 32,255 - 34,547 34,547 - 37,168 37,168

Labor force

(15-64)
29,619 26,044 55,663 41,205 36,714 77,919 44,060 39,342 83,402 47,415 42,533 89,948

Aged population

(65+)
1,822 1,668 3,490 2,459 2,252 4,711 2,614 2,394 5,008 2,782 2,547 5,329

Source: Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, 2018


Primary school population (6 -13 years): The total population of children in this age was

21,330 in 2009 and it is now 28,790. This population is expected to increase to 30,606 and

32,567 by 2020 and 2022 respectively. The entire population in this age group is expected to

be in primary school courtesy of Free Primary Education (FPE) programme. This will

therefore call for provision of adequate learning facilities that are well equipped and

accessible thus ensuring provision of quality education. The revised age for when pupils are

allowed to begin formal education also falls within this category and as such efforts have to

be made in ensuring that Early Childhood Development Education (ECDE) facilities are well

equipped with adequate teachers and learning materials for effective delivery of services.


Secondary school population (14-17 years): The population in this age group in 2009 was

8,744 and currently (2018) stands at 11,802. It is however expected to grow 12,547 and

13,350 in 2020 and 2022 respectively. With the transition rate of 73% and introduction of

subsidized tuition fee in secondary school, a large population in this age group is expected to

be in secondary school. The focus of the county is to therefore provide adequate secondary

schools with necessary facilities to absorb and provide quality education. While majority of

this age group are youth, special provisions have to be made by stakeholders and community

in general in ensuring that interest of the youth are catered for. This will include insulating

them against social vices such as drug abuse, early marriages and access to pornography.


Youth population (15-29 years): The population in this age group was projected at 28,474

in 2009 and at the time it constituted 28 percent of the county population. The population in

this age group is expected to increase to 36,796 from the current and 38,789 in 2020 and

2017 respectively. This age group that consists of youth both in school and out of school face

various challenges. The youth need skills to be able to engage in gainful employment and

should be insulated against contracting HIV and AIDS, and indulging in drug and substance

abuse, protecting them from early marriages, prostitution and unwanted pregnancies. This


11


can be achieved by ensuring that youth are occupied through sports activities, skills

development and acquisition of gainful knowledge through the various channels of

communication such as internet, radio programmes and youth centres.


Female reproductive age group (15-49 years): The number of women in this age group in

2009 stood at 22,843 constituting 23% of the county population. This group, which currently

stands at 32,255, is expected to expand to 34,547 and 37,168 by 2020 and 2022 respectively.

Women in this category will require access to specific services such as maternity and family

planning. The women, most of whom constitute the rural population, also form the backbone

of the Agricultural and Trade Sector. They face the full brunt of the triple burden in their

role of production, reproduction and performing community work. The challenge is therefore

to ensure that women in the reproductive age group are given ample opportunities to play

their roles.


Labour Force Age Group (15-64 Years): This group was projected to be 55,663 persons in

2009 and now (2018) it stands at 77,919. It is projected that the number will expand to 83,402

in 2020 and 89,948 by 2022.This calls for improvement in agriculture and investment in other

sectors to provide employment opportunities for the increasing labour force.


Aged population (65+): The aged population (over 65 years) was projected to be 3,490 in

2009 and now (2018) it stands at 4,711. It is projected that the number of this group will

increase to 5,008 by 2020 and 5,329 by 2022. This calls for investment in programmes to

support the older persons through mechnisms suc as increased allocation to cash transfer

funds for the aged and other relevant initiatives to ensure that they receive adequate health

care and nutritional attention. Policies such as the voucher system need to be rolled out to

enlist all the vulnerable members of this age group to minimise dependency.


1.5.2 Urban population

Amu Town which is the main urban centre in the county, had a projected population of

18,609 in 2012 which constituted 16% of the county population. Currently (2018) the

population in Amu stands at 22,721 persons. It is anticipated that the population will grow to

24,154 and 25,701 by the years 2020 and 2022 respectively. This can be attributed to the fact

that the town has relatively better infrastructural facilities in terms of banking facilities,

accommodation and internet access and serves as the tourism centre. The rise of urban

population is expected create additional demand for essential social services and urban

infrastructure. This calls for prior planning of available resources and expansion of social and

economic facilities in the urban areas to accommodate the expanding population. This

increasing population will also lead to increased demand for agricultural and industrial

products, triggering increased investment in those sectors.


Table 5: Population projection by Urban Centre

Urban

Centr

e

Projections 2018 Projections 2020 Projections 2022

Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Amu 11,427 11,294 22,721 12,148 12,006 24,154 12,926 12,775 25,701

Source: Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, 2018


12


1.5.3 Population Density and Distribution

The population distribution in the county is influenced by a number of factors including

access to economic opportunities such as agriculture, livestock keeping, fishing and trade.

This trend can be demonstrated by the fact that over 50 percent of the county population lives

in Amu and Mpeketoni in Lamu West Constituency, whereas Lamu East Constituency

accounts for 17 percent of the county population. Witu that is predominately a livestock zone

is occupied mainly by the Orma community. Mpeketoni, Hindi and some parts of Witu are

settlement schemes and are predominantly agricultural cosmopolitan areas. Besides Lamu,

the other islands comprising Pate, Kizingitini, Ndau and Siyu are mainly occupied by the

Bajuni community. Kiunga is inhabited by the Boni and Bajunis communities.


Table 6 gives the county population distribution based on constituencies, including projected

population density. Kizingitini Division is the smallest division with 18.1 Km2 but has

currently (2018) the highest population density of 622 per persons per Km2 followed by Amu

and Faza Divisions with 295 and 119 persons per Km2 Kiunga and Hindi divisions, on the

other hand, have low population densities of three and eight persons per Km2 respectively.

The low density in Kiunga, Witu and Hindi can be attributed to poor infrastructure, lack of

essential services and a long history of insecurity in the area.


Table 6: Projected population densities by Sub County

Sub County Division
Area

Km2

2009 2018 2020 2022

Pop. Density Pop
Densit

y
Pop Density Pop. Density

Lamu West Amu 102.4 22,366 218 30,189 295 32,093 313 34,148 335

Hindi 1804.9 10,700 6 14,,442 8 15,353 9 16,337 9

Mpeketoni 1360.7 36,527 26.8 49,303 36 52,413 39 55,770 41

Witu 1235.7 13,105 10 17,689 14 18,804 15 20,009 16

Lamu East Kizingitini 18.1 8,346 461 11,265 622 11,976 662 12,743 704

Faza 74.8 6,577 88 8,877 119 9,437 126 10,042 134

Kiunga 1570.1 3,918 2 5,288 3 5,622 4 5,982 4

Total 6474.7 101,539 16 137,053 21 145,698 23 155,031 24

Source: Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, 2018


1.5.4 Demographic Dividend


Demographic dividend is defined as the accelerated economic growth that a county can

experience as a result of declining fertility levels that occasion a reduction in the dependency

levels and an increase in the proportion of the population in the working ages (15-64 years).

As such, with the reducing number of dependents who need support, those in the working

ages will essentially have more savings that can potentially be invested for economic growth

of the county thus improving the overall wellbeing of the county’s residents. The attainment

of a demographic dividend is not automatic as the county needs to make simultaneous

strategic investments in health, education, economic and governance sectors as the fertility

levels decline. The aim of these investments is to ensure that as the county’s children and

youth get older, they remain healthy and are able to access education and training

opportunities. Consequently as they enter the labour force they are able to get income and

employment opportunities, invest for their life in old age, and they participate productively in


13


matters affecting the county.


Table 7: Demographic Dividend Potential

Indicator 2009 2014 2017 2020 2022 2030

Population Size 101,486 112,858 120,230 127,972 133,308 155,140

Population below 15 (%) 41.71 39.77 38.01 36.33 35.11 33.42

Population 15-64 (%) 54.85 56.89 58.92 60.48 61.82 62.85

Population above 65 (%) 3.44 3.34 3.07 3.18 3.07 3.73

Dependency ratio 82.32 75.79 69.72 65.34 61.76 59.10

Fertility rate 4.60 4.30 4.10 4.00 3.90 3.50


1.6 Human Development Approach

The human development approach emerged in response to the growing criticism of the use of

economic development as a measure of the standard of living. The approach examines

broader human development issues and is concerned with both building up human

capabilities and with using those human capabilities fully. It underlines the expansion of

opportunities so that the disadvantaged can do more for themselves through economic, social

and political empowerment.


Human development approach recognizes that there is no automatic link between economic

growth and human development. The link has to be made through deliberate policies at all

levels. Economic growth is necessary to enlarge human choices but not sufficient. Economic

growth provides resources to support health care, education, and advancement in other

Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In turn, achievements in human development make

critical contribution in assuring quality human capital to spur economic growth via

productivity gains.


The use of Human Development Index (HDI), normally in the Human Development Reports

(HDR) as a measure of a country’s development is a composite index measuring average

achievement in three basic dimensions of human development to reflect a country’s

achievements in health and longevity (as measured by life expectancy at birth), education

(measured by adult literacy and combined primary, secondary, and tertiary enrolments), and

living standard (measured by GDP per capita in purchasing power parity terms).

Achievement in each area is measured by how far a country has gone in attaining the

following goals: life expectancy of 85 years, adult literacy and enrolments of 100 percent,

and real GDP per capita of $40,000 in purchasing power parity terms.


National human development reports provide a tool for analysis, reflecting people’s

priorities, strengthening national capacities, engaging national partners, identifying inequities

and measuring progress at country level. The basic objectives of NHDRs are to raise public

awareness and trigger action on critical human development concerns, strengthen national

statistical and analytic capacity to assess and promote people-centred development; and shape

policies and programmes by providing options and broad recommendations based on

concrete analysis. It would be important in future, for counties to measure their development

by calculating and using the specific HDI and GDI.


14


1.6.1 Human Development Index


One of the main objectives under the Kenya’s economic blue print, Vision 2030, is to provide

a high quality of life for all Kenyans. Various human development indices will be applied to

measure the broad level of social economic well being. These indices uses three basic

dimensions namely education, health and income.


The HDI emphasizes that people and their capabilities should be the ultimate criteria for

assessing the development of a country and not economic growth alone since two

countries/regions with the same level of GNI per capita can end up with such different human

development outcomes.


The Constitution of Kenya, 2010 in Article 27 recognizes that measures should be put in

place to encourage affirmative action programmes and policies to address past inequalities.

Economic and social rights to all are also recognized in Article 43. These include the right to

health care services, adequate housing, and sanitation, adequate food of acceptable quality,

clean and safe water and appropriate social security to vulnerable groups in the society.


The 6th Kenya Human Development Report of 2009, Introduced a new measure for youth

development in Kenya, the Youth Development Index (YDI). The index was at 0.5817

nationally but also depicted variations across the regions. The index is a composite of

education, income and survivorship (health) dimensions. Therefore, it is critical to look at

youth as a resource and a potential wealth for a nation. However, a large group of youths are

potentially at risk of engaging in harmful anti-social behaviours, including risky sexual

behaviour, substance use, and crime.


The constitution requires measures to be undertaken to ensure the youth access relevant

education and training, have opportunities to participate in political, social, economic

activities, and access to employment as well as protection from harmful cultural practices.


1.6.2. The Gender Inequality Index (GII)

It reflects gender-based disadvantage in three dimensions—reproductive health,

empowerment and the labour market. The index shows the loss in potential human

development due to inequality between female and male achievements in these dimensions. It

varies between 0 (when women and men fare equally) and 1, where one gender fares as

poorly as possible in all measured dimensions.


Kenya has an overall GII of 0.651(Draft 7th Human Development Report) while Lamu

county is at 0.91. This is an indicator of high level of inequality between female and male

achievements in reproductive health, empowerment and the labour market. While generally

counties located in Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALS) having high GII, the specific case of

Lamu is worsened by the presence of the Vulnerable and Marginalized Groups existing

within the county who experience high levels of poverty. These vulnerable groups include

the disabled, the elderly and the indigenous communities. In this regard, improving equity in

gender issues and reducing gender disparities will benefit all sectors and thus contribute to

sustainable economic growth, poverty reduction and social injustices.


15


1.7 Infrastructure and Access

This chapter looks at the available transport options and infrastructure available in Lamu

County. It takes cognizance of the fact that the capacity of the levels of infrastructure and

transport development is key pillars to the development and economic well-being of any

County or Country in that respect.


Lamu County has notably three major options of transport comprising Water; Road; and Air.

These options connect the County both externally and internally. Rail connection is not

established within the County despite there being a need of a rail connection. The LAPSSET

project is anticipated to offer this opportunity and bridge this gap of rail connection to the

County once its implementation takes course. From the foregoing statement, it is also notable

that there is need to connect Lamu County with the existing rail in Mombasa port. This is in a

bid to promote inter-County trading but also to realize the economic gains of product export

as Lamu County has a lot to offer the world.


Additionally, Lamu County is set to benefit from other projects of strategic National

importance including investments in the energy sector with the proposed sites for both wind

and coal power sites within the County. All these mega infrastructural projects will go a long

way in promoting the economic well-being of the County. This Chapter therefore seeks to

place Lamu County in its current position relative to the anticipated impacts of the

development scenarios that will be occasioned by the realization of the proposed

development projects in the County.


The chapter has been organized under different sub-heads that run through the chapter in the

following order:


1.7.1 Road Transport ( Network & Distribution)

Roads are the main means of transport in all regions of the world and nearly all other means

of transport like air and water cannot function effectively without depending on road

networks. At the simplest perspective, road networks open up regions and other geographical

areas to development. This is through movement of goods, information and migration of

people with the final product being agglomeration of human activities in the regions.


Lamu County is not unique and also needs defined and elaborate road networks if its growth

and potential is to be discovered. From a recent Senatorial Committee in charge of Transport

in Parliament visit to Lamu County, it was observed that there has been minimal progress in

the construction of Roads and other infrastructure projects in Lamu owing to the geography

of the area and the limited financial allocations. This was attributed to the fact that Lamu

County has never received the equalization fund that was meant to benefit marginalized

regions in Kenya. As such accessibility of Lamu County by road is rather difficult hence

limiting access to markets, exchange of information and affecting the overall economic

growth of the County


In the context of road transport, external transportation corridors are some of the most

important trunk road networks as they connect Countries; Counties; Towns to Towns. These

roads are mostly classified as International or National Trunk roads which could either be

Class A, B, or C roads. Their comparative advantage cannot be overlooked as basic essential

to promote economies since aspects such as trade are promoted through these transportation

networks. The total length of all classified roads in the County is 688.6Km with bitumen


16


surface covering 6Km, gravel surface 161.1Km and earth surface 521.5Km. A great

percentage of the roads in the County are in the mainland. These roads connect to various

Centres within the County and are as follows:


The Witu-Lamu (via Mokowe Jetty)-Kiunga Class C road which is a major road still remains

in a deplorable state despite over thirty (30) years of promises that it would be tarmacked.

The road forms the main access into the County and connects from the existing bitumen

paved road from Garsen. Garsen is a strategic Centre which is connected to the main road

network by a bitumen surfaced road to the main Malindi to Garissa Road (B8). This gives

access to the coast road to Mombasa, and via the Malindi-Manyani Road to Nairobi.


The extension of the road into the County ends at Nyongoro, through Witu and Hindi to

Mokowe, and from Hindi through Milimani to Kiunga. The road is approximately 250 km

long of which 210 km was earmarked in 2008 for expansion and tarmacking. The most

important trunk road in Lamu County is the Malindi-Garsen-Mokowe Class C road which

constitute a high accessibility development corridor. This corridor presents opportunities for

location of centres such as Witu, Muhamarani, Mkunumbi, Hindi and Mokowe and is the

main spine upon which the secondary roads hinge. It connects Lamu County to Tana River

County. Recent efforts by the County Government to murram the road has been quite

commendable though it still poses high accessibility issues between various centres

especially during the rainy season.


Other important National roads in the County include the Hindi-Bodhei road that connects

the County to Garissa County; and extends as Milimani Road up to the border with Somalia

through Basuba and Kiunga; the Witu-Kipini road which connects to Tana River County.

These roads put the County at a great location advantage in the event that the potential of

Inter-County trading is well explored within the region since Lamu County pose higher

competitiveness by all degree as compared to the other Counties. This will ultimately result

in promoting the growth of the County as the main economic hub within that upper region of

the Coast Counties.


These roads are equally in a poor state making movement quite tedious. The economic

potential held under these roads were they to be opened up and tarmacked has not been

realized yet. Furthermore, the roads are still classified as class D roads and this might pose

challenges in the future if not revised and classified as Class B. This is because there will be

more people living and trading within Lamu County. This means that the road widths

recommended for Class D roads may not be commensurate with the anticipated activities that

may occur along the economic corridors. In this regard, it may be necessary to upgrade them

now when the space for expansion is still available; survey and formally demarcate their

boundaries accordingly.


Opening up of these areas through proposed road networks or upgrading existing road routes

that currently only existing as cut lines will highly boost inter-county trading and information

sharing. It will go a long way in promoting sustained economic benefits to the County.


1.7.1.1 Sea Transport


17


Another form of external connection to the County is sea formally known as water transport.

Sea transport in the County dates back a very long time and is very important because it links

Lamu with other port Cities in/and outside Kenya.


The proposed LAPSSET project will immensely contribute to the opening up of the County

externally to other Port Cities and Nations of the world. This is because proposed crude oil

pipelines have been propsed to run from the Lamu Port and link the Country to the

neighboring countries of Tanzania and Uganda and the rest of the world. The implementation

of the Lamu Port will see the construction of 32 berths within the sea as docking areas for the

ships. This will boost the connectivity of the County to the outside world by sea immensely.


The port will not only promote trade between countries as a terminal for petroleum and crude

oil transport but will also promote growth of tourism. This is because opportunities of linking

the County to other cities globally will now exist when this platform where passenger cruise

ships can dock will now be established. Mombasa as a City and a County in whole has been

benefiting a lot in tourism through such connection where tourism vessels has been docking

in the port of Mombasa over time. This however do not satisfy the immense opportunities

within the Kenyan coastline and the construction of the Lamu port will offer viable options to

navigators and tourists who like cruising the East African coast line. This will boost tourism

activities in Lamu County over time resulting to multiplier effects of tourism gains realized in

the County.


1.7.1.2 Air Transport


In a County like Lamu where road transport is very poor and external sea transport is non-

existent, air transport emerges as a key transport option to link the County to other Counties

of Kenya or other Countries of the world. There is currently one airport located on Manda

Island (Manda Airport), and 12 airstrips in the County found in Mokowe, Witu, Mkunumbi,

Pate, Siyu, Tenewi, Mangai, Kizingitini, Kiwayuu, Mkokoni, Kiunga and Mararani.


The Government recently completed lengthening of Lamu-Manda Island Airport runway

from 1.1km to 2.3kms. Improvement works are already complete for the airport terminal

building. Preparations are at an advanced stage towards the construction of a parallel taxiway

and aircraft apron area to improve capacity of the airport. These improvements will enhance

the capacity of Manda Lamu Airport that already has a strong scheduled flights clientele. The

airport has also embarked on a project to supply fresh water from Lamu Island to the airport.

The four major airlines that operate at Manda Airstrip are, Kenya Airways, Air Kenya, Fly

540, Safari link and Skyward Express.


Apart from Manda airport, all the other airstrips do not have regular flights. Mokowe airstrip,

though not tarmacked, is also well maintained with a length of about 1000meters. The Witu,

Mkunumbi, Siyu, Kizingitini and Kiunga airstrips are simple but of adequate length (up to

800m) and are of strategic locational importance.


1.7.1.3 Ports & Jetties


There are several jetties but the most important ones are the customs (KPA) jetties on Lamu

Island and the Mokowe jetty on the mainland. The two are the busiest registering the highest


18


number of boats carrying both passengers and goods. The Manda Island jetty (shown below)

connects Lamu Island with Manda Airport.


There are other jetties are also located at Mkunumbi, Kizuka, Magogoni, Kizingitini,

Mtangawanda, Siyu, Matondoni among others. With extensive mangrove forests, swamps

and mud due to tidal changes, access to and from the sea is difficult without jetties and they

act as the terminal facilities to necessitate water transport within the islands.


Lamu Island has the majority of the County’s inhabitants linked from the main land via the

Mokowe jetty living within Amu Heritage Town; Langoni settlement; Wiyuooni Settlement;

Shella; Matondoni Village; and Kipungani Village. The settlements are not will linked and

there are no motorable roads except along the seashore - Lamu Sea wall where a cabrol street

has been established. The street connects directly from Amu Town to Shella and Langoni;

and also Wiyuooni where the most preferred mode of transport within the street and

settlements by extension is by use of donkeys; walking; and cycling.


Shella Town is a dormitory Touristic Town and the efforts to link it to the Heritage Town by

the County Government could not have come at a better time. The cabrol street serves the

linkage in a very profound manner and creates more opportunities for both domestic; and

foreign tourism immensely. The linkage through the Island to Matondoni; and Kipungani

villages which are both a craft; and fishing settlements will need to be enhanced and

improved to promote economic interaction between the settlements. The current popular

mode of transport to Matondoni and Kipungani within the Island is by water which is often

quite expensive and not safe.


Road connection within the island to the various settlements is quite challenged and need to

be improved. There exists traditional cutlines running connecting Lamu Old Town to

Matondoni and Kipungani. However, these cutlines are most often sandy making walking

quite a challenge thus reducing the volume of trade and social interaction between the various

settlements. In addition, access to the major health facilities and higher-level services offered

within the Old Town is limited due to this connectivity gap. A good linkage to these

settlements would potentially offer an alternative option of access to the main land at

Kiongwe.


Pate Island has quite a large population catchment with the biggest villages (Faza; and

Kizingitini) having populations of about 8,000; and 6,000 people respectively (KNBS, 2009).

The Island settlements are connected through one major Class E spine road where all other

roads hinge.


The roads are equally in a deplorable state; unpaved and often impassable during rainy

seasons. All settlements within the Island from Faza village including Tchundwa; Nyabogi;

Mbwajumwali; Kizingitini; Siyu; and Shanga are all connected by the major road in their

nucleated structure to Mtangawanda jetty.


It was noted that the road need to be paved and upgraded to a level that creates and promotes

more opportunities for interaction; trade; and accessibility to the human settlements areas it

connects to Kizingitini and Faza Villages were observed as prominent human settlement

areas within the Island. The level of services offered within the villages and economic

opportunities available in the two villages are immense owing to their population catchment.

Kizingitini village holds tremendous advantage point of growth if well harnessed as a stop-


19


over village for fish and other economic ventures due to its proximity and location where it

faces the open sea. It has a jetty and its strategic location as an entry point to Lamu County

from the open sea cannot be overlooked.


1.7.2. Post And Telecommunications:Post Office, Mobile Telephony, Landline

The county has five branches of the public post office evenly distributed across the county.

The post office however faces competition from private couriers that operate in the county.

These include; G4S, wellsfargo, air and road transport courier services. Telkom Kenya

provides landline services covering Lamu Town with an estimated 2600 fixed telephone

connections. The county enjoys diverse mobile network services whose network connectivity

is estimated to cover 75 percent of the county with 80 out of 100 persons owning mobile

phones.

There are six registered cyber cafes in the county out of which five are in Lamu Town and

one in Mpeketoni. The internet penetration remains low at 15 percent in the entire county.

The radio and television signal penetration remains poor with the Kenya broadcasting

cooperation, Radio Rahma, Sifa FM and Radio Jambo being the signals received in the

county without the use of a satellite dish.

1.7.3. Energy and Access

Energy is an essential factor for sustainable development and poverty eradication. The

challenge lies in finding ways to reconcile the necessity and demand for modern and

sustainable energy services with its impact on the environment and the global natural

resource base in order to ensure that sustainable development goals are realised. The energy

sector plays a vital role in the world economy. Increased fossil fuel prices, energy security

issues and climate change have been the main driving forces to development of alternative

and renewable energy sources. As a result of increased population expansion and faster

economic growth, energy consumption is growing rapidly in different economies the world

over.

In spite of national and international efforts, however, most energy in the future will continue

to be based on fossil fuels. Renewable energy currently accounts for 7 percent of global

energy consumption, and is largely based on hydropower and biomass. Most biomass energy

is consumed in developing countries (70 percent of the total), mainly for cooking and heating,

with a smaller share going to power generation. This section therefore, provides a highlight of

the available energy options in Lamu County, the way they affect development and

interrogates viable options of alternative energy sources


Electricity and Solar energy are the most widely used in the County. Recently the

Government has embarked in promoting power generation in the Country and in a quest to

boost this, a coal power Plant has been proposed in Lamu County under the Amu Power

Project. The coal Plant is located in Manda Bay in Lamu, a distance of about 250km by air

and 300km by road from Mombasa. The Plant is expected to inject 1050 MW of energy into

the National Grid.


On this note, it is important to note that the National grid power line has reached Lamu

County and already connected to both the mainland; and the archipelago. The grid line is part

of the 323Km 220KV power line built by Kenya Electricity Transmission Company

(KETRACo) from Rabai to Lamu under the rural electrification programme. This has enabled

the County and especially in the major Centres like Lamu Old Town, Mpeketoni, Mokowe,


20


Hindi and Shella to deviate from the traditional diesel-powered generators for electricity. It

has also opened opportunities for investment and industries within the County that are high

consumers of electricity power.


The National Government through the Rural Electrification Programme has also established a

power station to light up the island for the first time. The connecting power lines have already

been laid out within the island to enhance connection to various homesteads within the island.

This initiative by the Government would not have come at a better time and is aimed at

improving the living standards and livelihoods of the residents of the island. This milestone

marks an important case in the making of this Spatial Plan. This is because any proposed

development project that is high power consuming can now be accommodated within the

island with power supply guaranteed.


Additionally, the Lamu County Assembly has already approved a proposed Sh20 billion wind

power project which is to be set up in Kiongwe, Bahari Ward - Mpeketoni. The 800 Ha wind

farm will be located about 20 kilometers from the site of the proposed Lamu Port. The project

which is under a Belgium company Electrawinds in partnership with World Bank and

Kenwind Company of Kenya is expected to generate about 90MW of electricity to be

injected to the National grid.


There is a lot of potential for Solar energy in Lamu county. The sun’s heat and light (solar) is

available for almost 12 hours a day. Solar energy is silent inexhaustible and non-polluting.

What is basically required is the technology and resources to develop this kind of power in

large scale within Lamu County. Most settlements however within the islands have tapped

solar energy as the main source of energy within their homesteads. Furthermore, the County

Government; together with the World Bank have also adopted the use of solar energy in

street lighting.


Wood fuel commonly also known as firewood is the main source of energy for cooking and

lighting in the rural areas of Lamu County with a few exceptions within the urban settings.

The cost of wood fuel is not uniform and depends on demand and availability. Owing to low

population density, and the large vegetated and forest areas, widespread de-vegetation is not

common in the County. However, as the county population increases, the impact on the

environment caused by deforestation in a bid to provide woodfuel for domestic use is

becoming a great concern and needs to be addressed.


1.7.3 Markets and Urban Centres

The county has two main markets, namely Lamu Town and Mpeketoni Central. Lamu Town

which is the main urban centre is famous for its rich cultural activities and a world heritage

site. Mpeketoni Central is famous for trading and agricultural activities. There are several

other trading centres located along the road which include the following; Mokowe, Hindi,

Hongwe, Bomani, Majembeni, Kiongwe, Baharini, Mapenya, Mkunumbi, Uziwa, Faza,

Kizingitini, Pate, Siyu, Kiunga, Mkokoni, Mhamarani, Katsakairu, Witu and Moa.


1.7.4 Housing


Housing conditions in the County are characterized by inadequate modern sanitary facilities

and limited connection to piped water with exception of Lamu Old Town and Mpeketoni.


21


The villages are haphazard and poorly planned making accessibility difficult and roads are

quite narrow and in other areas non-existent. Housing in the County is generally inadequate

and this shortage is more acute in the upcoming urban centres outside Lamu town. The

anticipated growth in population for the County occasioned by the upcoming development

projects will require development of newly planned urban areas with integrated solid and

liquid waste management system as proposed in this Plan.


1.7.4.1 Housing Density


Housing densities are defined by the population size, plot coverage and the number of

dwelling units. The level of density is determined by availability of services such as water,

sewerage, size of roads, etc. The highest densities in the County are within the urban/service

centres of the County and the archipelago villages. The maximum plot sizes for these high-

density areas was noted as 50x100ft often characterized by less access provisions or none at

all.


1.8 Land and Land Use

1.8.1 Land Ownership categories/classification

1.8.2 Mean Holding Size


The size of arable land in the county is 5,517 Km2 and non arable land is 649.7 Km2 and 308

Km2 is under water mass. A sizeable number of people living in the peri-urban areas of the

county practice subsistence small scale farming and livestock keeping. Land ownership for

agricultural and livestock remains a thorny issue in the county as most of the farmers do not

legally own the lands they cultivate.


1.8.3 Percentage of land with title deeds


The number of the households who have title deeds stand at 13,000. This therefore means

that 42 percent of the entire households in the county have titles. Majority of the households

in the county have no title deeds.


1.8.4 Incidence of Landlessness

A large portion of land in the county remains unregistered. These include areas in Kiunga,

Faza, parts of Hindi, Manda Island, Witu and Bahari. Most of these areas are ancestral land

and the government is hastening the process of resettlement whose aim is to also conserve the

Swahili villages in the county. A large portion of land set aside for ranch purposes still

remains idle, under stocked and some of it is not in us


1.9 Wage Earners


The county’s total labour force (15-64 years) stands at 68,026, which represent 54 percent of

the total county population (2015). The composition of this labour force is 52 percent

(36,198) male and 48 percent (31,829) female.


22


Agriculture and agricultural related activity remains the largest contributer to the rural

household income at 90 percent. Other sources include tourist related employment at five

percent, wage employment at two percent and urban self-employment at two percent. The

increased contribution of agriculture to household income is explained by the fact that a large

part of county population resides in the rural areas. The rural population constitutes 72

percent (93,641) of the county population. This will therefore call for doubling of efforts to

revitalize sub-sectors which have the capacity to provide employment for many people. The

challenge is therefore to see that the agricultural sector creates more employment

opportunities for the un-employed. At the same time livestock and fisheries sector capacity

has to be enhanced so that they create more employment. The tourism and trade sub-sectors

are other important areas, which can absorb the increasing number of people joining the

labour force. The new LAPSSET programme is also expected to absorb a large number of the

skilled and non-skilled labour from the county.


At the same time, more efforts have to be made in investing in the production of a labour

force which is skilled, innovative and is always ready to upgrade skills gained through both

formal institutions and tacit knowledge.


1.9.1 Self Employed

The urban self-employment stands at 1.5 percent while rural self-employment is currently at

0.5 percent. In terms of numbers, rural self-employment accounts for 7,890 people while

urban self-employment accounts for 3,810 people. This shows the pivotal role played by the

agriculture subsector in the county.


1.9.2 Labour force


The county’s total labour force (15-64 years) stands at 61,535, which represent 54 percent of

the total county population (2012). The composition of this labour force is 52 percent

(32,743) male and 48 percent (28,721) female. Due to cultural and religious beliefs, most of

the female population is not widely engaged in paid employment although they carry out

other equally productive domestic activities.


Most of the labour force is unskilled with only a small percentage engaged in fishing, boat

making, wood-carving and embroidery. It is estimated that 46 percent of the labour force is

illiterate which implies that only a small proportion of the labour force can be absorbed as

skilled labour required for poverty reduction programmes in the county. With an increase in

the number of vocational institutions, it is expected that the percentage of semi-skilled and

skilled labour will increase.


1.9.3 Unemployment level


1.10 Irrigation infrastructure and schemes

1.10.1 Irrigation Potential

Lamu County has high irrigation potential throughout the county and is estimated at 30,000

ha. The potential has remained unexploited as irrigation farming is practised on less than 300


23


ha out of the existing irrigation potential particularly in Lamu West. Majority of farmers in

the county are over-dependent on rain-fed agriculture. Crop production has therefore

remained seasonal where there is bumper harvest during rainy season and scarcity of food

during dry season. This therefore calls for the adoption of water harvesting technologies for

surface runoff through water pan excavation, earth dam construction, negarims, shallow

wells, zai pits among others to provide water for irrigated agriculture.


1.10.2 Irrigation Schemes (small/ large scale)

The county has no large irrigation schemes in place. However, the county has a number of

individual farmers who have adopted simple irrigation technologies especially around

swamps, water pans and shallow wells. Lamu County Government has on-farm irrigation

programme to facilitate establishment of small-scale irrigation projects to reduce over-

dependence on rain-fed agricultural production. The programme has enhanced access to

water through tapping of ground and surface water, and up-scaling of flood-based water

harvesting. Currently, the county government in collaboration with the national government

has so far established ten (10) irrigation projects covering an average of ten (10) acres per

project.


1.11 Crop, Livestock, Fish Production and Value addition


1.11.1 Crops Production


A wide range of crops that include maize, cowpeas, cassava, coconut, cashew nut, bixa,

cotton, simsim, citrus, and tomatoes among others are grown in the county under rain-fed

system. Crops’ farming produce about 314,000 tons of both food and cash crops annually

from 69,025 ha. The county is Kenya’s largest producer of cotton, simsim and bixa,

producing approximately 40%, of cotton, 50% of simsim and 40% of bixa grown in the

country, Kenya. This has significant implications on income generation, food security and

poverty reduction efforts in the county. Crop production in the county for the last 5 years has

remained rain-fed. About 80% of crops are planted during long rains and the remaining 20%

during short rains. Short rains are not reliable for crops production. The drought experienced

in the county in 2014 and 2016 and 2017 had impact on both food and cash crop production.

The production of crops and their respective value are as presented in table 10.


Table 8: Production levels for both of bothfood and cash crops

Crops
Yearly Production in Tons

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Cereals

Maize 43,614 42,692 49,588 17,973 32,096

Rice 31.8 41.15 39.15 47 60

Sorghum 1,086 269.9 746 4.5 18

Legumes

Dolichos Bean 344 786.7 468.8 433 46

Cow Pea 3,347 3,490 5,651 3,272 4,934


24


Crops
Yearly Production in Tons

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Green Grams 2,760 2,913 3,397 1,256 6,785

Root Crops

Cassava 15,968 23,555 21,800 38,880 24,600

Nuts

Simsim 1,170 3,700 8,270 3,193 11,107

Coconut 2,755 10,537 11,328 9,439 14,327

Cashew Nuts 5,854 6413.2 7,771 7,919 11,772

Bixa 4,883 4,827 4,650 4,342 5,291

Fibre Crops

Cotton 4,416 7,739 7755 3919 4,544

Fruits

Banana 37,211 26,654 28,128 12,138 39,227

Mango 59,270 40,419 42,582 11,350 24,275

Oranges 7,865 7,865 10,304 8,233 14,480

Tangerines 2,831 3,248 7,104 4220 1,260

Lemons 785 785 2,240 14,304 15,638

Lime 2,100 2,100 6,086 3,742 13,870

Pawpaw 6,090 10,923 17,165 15 30

Water Melons 27,280 27,200 28,805 25,000 58,670

Vegetables

Kales 3,075 3,000 6,180 3,200 9,230

Tomatoes 10,155 12,140 4,550 5,233 10,265


Value of crops is directly related to existing market price. Most farmers’ crop produce in the

county are sold in raw form leading to low returns for farmers. Lack of structured marketing

has allowed middlemen to exploit farmers by offering low prices. The value of crops is as

shown in Table 11.


Table 9: Value in '000 KShs for both food and cash crops

Crops
Value In ‘000 Kshs

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Cereals

Maize 1,187,641 1,025,800 1,239,700, 449,325 9,069,076

Rice 3,186 3,300 3,132 3,760 3,429

Sorghum 68,589 21,600 44,856 270 1,027

Legumes

Dolichos Bean 30,942 78,670 46,880 43,300 3680

Cow Pea 282,484 294,535 383,382 2,219,837 65575

Green Grams 262,590 236,201 275,446 101,843 750,947

Root Crops

Cassava 319,360 440,725 436,000 777,600 492,000


25


Crops Value In ‘000 Kshs

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Nuts

Simsim 116,100 296,000 496,200 191,580 741,785

Coconut 64,514 611,190 664,200 553,441 3,126,700

Cashew Nuts 263,430 295,434 412,185 420,035 450,563

Bixa 219,735 217,215 209,250 195,390 238,095

Fibre Crops

Cotton 185,472 325,038 325,710 164,598 209,820

Fruits

Banana 892,805 534,408 574,540 247,929 285,716

Mango 1,007,246 533,857 313,819 83,646 105,279

Oranges 235942 235,942 309,120 246,990 434,400

Tangerines 84,915 97,461 213,111 126,600 37,800

Lemons 11,781 15,708 44,790 286,016 286,120

Lime 42,017 42,018 151,880 93,383 113,702

Pawpaw 2,451,187 220,956 345,804 302,188 3,000

Water Melons 820,800 680,000 633,710 550,000 377,665

Vegetables

Kales 61,500 60,000 123,600 64,000 80,108

Tomato 454.221 454,222 639,500 239,680 189,134


1.11.2 Acreage Under Food and Cash Crops


Lamu County experienced a general expansion of acreage of both food and cash crops. More

land was put under crops due to increased access to farm tractor services offered by county

government at subsidized cost. The table below shows the acreages achieved for both food

and cash crops. The main challenges remained insecurity and erratic rains. The acreage of

both food and cash crops is as shown in Table 12.


Table 10: Acreages under food and cash crops

Crops Crops Achievement In Hectares

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Cereals

Maize 21,324 20,149 26,125 17,020 25,332

Rice 36 82 120.5 89 22

Sorghum 1,326 263 652 6 410

Legumes

Dolichos Bean 478 1,063 559 543 512

Cow Pea 2,832 3,620 5,531 4,956 5,028

Green Grams 2,959 3,214 3,504 5,910 8,966

Root Crops

Cassava 798.4 1,279 1099 1198 477

Nuts


26


Crops Crops Achievement In Hectares

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Cereals

Simsim 2,667 7,447 11,753 3,160 7,175

Coconut 1,600 4,595 4,738 5,215 2,200

Cashew Nuts 4,832 7,153 7,223 8,293 6,050

Bixa 2,110 2,099 2,023 2230 2435

Fibre Crops

Cotton 2,944 5,159 5,170 6,531 5,600

Fruits

Banana 1491.8 1,492 1,763 1,988 1995

Mango 2,229 2,229 2,369 2,531 2819

Oranges 562.1 562 821 821 852

Tangerines 167 191 263 246 210

Lemons 56.1 56 149 149 288

Lime 175.3 175 465 465 562

Pawpaw 608.05 608 957 5 10

Water Melons 683.2 680 551 1000 2167

Vegetables

Kales 153 150 309 101 327.5

Tomato 246 276 288 130 255.0


1.11.3 Average Farm Sizes


The most commonly practiced farming system in the County is the small scale mixed farming

comprising of crops, livestock and trees. The system is viable and economically feasible

practised by about 11,000 small-scale farmers with an average individual farm size of 4

hectares. These small-scale farmers are the key target for agricultural extension services for

improvement of agricultural productivity and production.


1.11.4 Main Storage Facilities


There has been a high level of produce post-harvest losses occasioned by pests and diseases,

lack of proper handling, lack of storage facilities and poor market infrastructure. Although

there is an NCPB depot in the county with a capacity of 40,000 bags of 90 kg, the depot only

stores grain reserves mainly sourced from upcountry for relief and commercial purposes. At

farm level, storage facilities are inadequate, inappropriate and are in deplorable conditions

which have made smallholder farmers unable to cope with pests and diseases mainly due to

high cost of control measures. The cooperatives in the county are in poor state and are not

able to provide adequate storage infrastructure to the members.


1.11.5 Agricultural Extension, Training, Research and Information Services


27


Provision of extension service in the county is mainly by the government. The public

extension service aims at enhancing adoption of new farming technologies to improve crop

production and incomes. However, the effectiveness of extension services has declined due to

inadequate research-extension-farmer linkages, lack of demand-driven research, low staff:

farmer ratio and low budgetary allocation to support extension service delivery to farmers to

understand and apply the acquired knowledge. Private sector, Non-Governmental

Organizations (NGOs) and civil society players have not effectively complemented public

sector extension in the field. The few who are in the county may lack professionalism and

also disseminate conflicting extension messages to our farming community.


The existing agricultural institutions have not been fully utilized by farming community and

stakeholders in the county to acquire knowledge to improve production and income.

Agricultural research infrastructure in the county mainly deals with on-farm trials for

technology testing and adoption. An overriding challenge for both public and private sector

extension provision is how to mobilize sufficient resources to provide the required services

and formulate a strategy for increasing private sector participation.


1.11.6 Farm Input and Credit Accessibility


The access to affordable credit is inadequate and therefore remains a major drawback to

finance procurement of inputs and capital investment in areas such as value addition

technologies, irrigation infrastructure and general farm development. The prevailing high

interest rates regime and difficulty in administering loans in rural areas like in Kiunga,

coupled by short grace periods offered by banks makes accessibility to credit for financing

agriculture to be relatively unattractive.


The inputs quality control and inspection personnel is absent ain the county and this has

encouraged unscrupulous businessmen to stock and sell low quality and substandard farm

inputs. This has lead to low productivity and output at farm level.


1.11.7 Agricultural Markets and Products


Market access is critical to the development of agriculture and irrigation sub-sector. In Lamu

County, there are only two physical markets for farm produce: one at Amu and the other one

at Mpeketoni which are administered by the county government. Markets in other areas of

Witu, Hindi, Kiunga and Faza are in form of vegetable kiosks situated in the town centres and

along the major roads. The kiosks mainly sell vegetables, fruits and cereals sourced from

local farmers. The volumes of farm produce available at these markets in the whole county

vary with seasons leading to fluctuations in prices. There gaps in marketing information

system which make producers and consumers not regularly receiving market information.

Processing facilities in the county are inadequate and have continued to constrain

marketability of particularly perishable goods such as fruits and vegetables. There is only one

known processing unit, the out dated Mpeketoni ginnery that have left farmers sell their crop

produce in raw form. The co-operative societies in the county are inadequate and weak due to

poor governance and corruption that has made it difficult for farmers to adequately market

their produce for maximum returns. The only operational cooperative is Lake Kenyatta

Cooperative Society Ltd based in Mpeketoni.


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1.11.8 Sustainable Land Use Practices


The county continues to experience accelerated loss of forest cover, drying of watering points

and increased soil erosion. At the farm level, farmers are faced with the problem of land

degradation impacting negatively on crop production mainly due to reduction of soil fertility,

increased soil compaction and reduced water infiltration. Some farming practices such as

shift cultivation and “slash and burn” practiced mostly in Lamu East and the indiscriminate

bush clearing (“Witemere”) in Lamu West exacerbate degradation of the land


1.11.9 Main livestock breeds and facilities


The main livestock species reared are Cattle, Sheep, Donkeys, Goat and Poultry. Cattle and

goats are reared in 2 rearing systems: Pastoralism mainly practiced in Hindi (Kibokoni,

Kilimani and Bargoni), Mkunumbi (Ndambwe, Mkunumbi, Koreni), Bahari Ward (Mlei,

Lake Amu) Hongwe war Lumshi A&B, Pangani) Witu ward (Moa, Chalaluma, Didewaride,

Nagele, Kitumbini, Nairobi area).


Agro – pastoralists occupying pockets of Hindii (Ndeu, Kauthara, Show ground); Mkunumbi

(Mapenya, Bangure, Mwamarani, Majembeni, Mkindunu) Bahari ward (Town, Bahari,

Kihongwe) Hongwe ward(Hongwe, Bomani, Umoja, Kibaoni) Witu ward(Soroko, Kona

mbaya, Maleli, Katsaka Kairu,Witu mjini) Dairy cattle and dairy goats farming/ rearing is

practiced mainly in all settlement schemes areas of Hindi ward, Bahari ward, Hongwe ward,

Mkomani ward and Witu ward.


Donkeys, a major draught animal are reared mainly in Amu (Mkomani and Shella Manda)

and Pate (Faza ward) Islands, where it is the main source of transport.

Honey production is mainly practiced around the Boni forest areas of Basuba and Witu

wards. There is though a high potential of honey production utilizing the vast mangrove

forests bordering the Indian Ocean in the county.

Indigenous Chicken is reared in almost all the homesteads of Lamu County with flock size

ranging between 5 – 10 chicken per household. The indigenous chicken ecotypes reared

includes: Mirimiri, Mwaruhe Mbete (Dwarf), Kidemu (frizzled feathers ), Inglishi(Naked

neck), Kuchi(predominantly Lamu East) and chitsutsu. Of late we have Kari Kienyeji,

Kuroiler and Kenbro.


1.11.10 Ranching


There are 20 ranches/grazing reserves in the county are in four Status i.e. operational ranches

which are four (Witu Nyongoro DAC Ranch, Witu Livestock Cooperative Ranch, Amu

Cooperative Ranch and Mokowe Kibokoni Cooperative Ranch). The other ranches are idle

and not operational.


1.12 Forestry, Agro Forestry and Value addition

1.12.1 Main Forest types and size of forests (Gazetted and Un-gazetted forests)


29


Lamu Forest ecosystems are landscapes dominated by trees and also characterized by woody

and herbaceous flora with complex interactions between soils, water and other physical

factors (Barnes et. al 1982). Lamu County is home to some of Kenya`s most unique and

indigenous forest woodlands, courtesy of the regions agro - climatic regime. The largest

forest area in Lamu is the area referred to as the Boni-Dodori.


Mangrove forests are the predominate vegetation growing on the shallow water within the

Lamu Archipelago and the mainland around the ocean creeks. In the islands of Pate, Ndau,

Manda and to some extent Lamu, the mangrove forests form a ring like pattern of a very

pristine environment. The mangrove forest therefore gives Lamu County its unique identity

and all efforts should be made to preserve and protect the mangrove forest to at least maintain

the cover in its current level or increase to a higher level. Other forests in Lamu include the

coastal lowland forests of Witu, Boni-Lungi forest ecosystems and the Dodori National

Reserve, these forests are extremely important for their variety of Plant species; and other

biodiversity they support. Both Witu, Boni and Lungi forests are gazetted forest with unique

challenges posed by human settlements and incursion by livestock in search of water and

pasture.


The mangroves of Lamu County cover approximately 54,000Ha, equivalent to 90% of the

national mangrove coverage in Kenya. Nine species of mangroves are found in Lamu i.e.

Sonneratia alba (Mlilana), Rhizophora mucronata (Mkoko), Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (Muia),

Ceriops tagal (Mkandaa), Avicennia marina (Mchu), Xylocarpus granatum (Mkomafi),

Xylocarpus moluccensis (Mkomafi dume), Lumnitzera racemosa (Kikandaa), and Heritiera

littoralis (Mkungu). Mangroves of Lamu County are classified into five management blocks

namely; Northern Swamps, Pate Island Swamps, North Central Swamps, Southern Swamps,

Mongoni and Dodori Creek Swamps. The Northern Central Swamps are within the Kiunga

Marine National Reserve (KMNR) and are dominated by pure stands of Rhizophora which

are relatively pristine. The average stand density and volume is 2,225 stems/ha and 382.8

m3/ha respectively. In terms of forest structure and productivity, the most complex

mangroves in Lamu occur in the KNMR; particularly at Mambore and Rubu.


There is also savannah woodland, thicket and farmland which supports significant

populations of mammals such as buffalo, coastal topi, African wild dog, Aider’s duiker,

baboons, wild pigs, hippos, the rare rumped back elephant shrew (a rare and endangered

mammal), a host of other faunal species such as snakes, birds, and butterflies. Other than the

main forest area there are smaller pockets of protected forest areas such as Witu, Lungi,

Pandanguo, Kipini and Lake Kenyatta buffer zone. Most of these smaller forest areas are

threatened by human pressure.


1.12.2 Main forest products


The Lamu community use the forest in various ways and derive their livelihoods from the

forest products such as fruits; wild vegetables; herbal medicine from leaves, roots, and stems

of the trees bee keeping and honey harvesting; pastures for livestock; construction materials;

boat making in form of dug-out canoes, and fuel-wood. Due to increasing population in the

area, attracted by availability of land, good climate for rain-fed agriculture and the opening

up of the area in anticipation of the planned LAPSSET project and other developments, the

terrestrial resources are facing new pressure.


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1.12.3 Agro forestry


Forests cover 33.9% of total county land surface area. 428 Km² (64%) of these forests cover

is gazette, hence protected against commercial exploitation. These include 382 Km² of

mangrove forest and 46 Km² of Witu forest. The non-commercial activities cover 280 Km²

comprising of Lingi forest, Boni forest and Lake Kenyatta buffer zone. More and more

farmers and institutions are now participating in agro-forestry. The main forest products

include the Mangrove poles used for construction, fire wood, charcoal and casuarinas poles.

Forest products such as mangroves are harvested for building also have been sold for years to

the Middle East.


1.13 Financial services


Lamu County has 8 commercial banks and a number of other non-bank financial institutions

proving financial services to the people. However these institutions are all located in Lamu

West sub-county. This leaves the remaining east sub-county lagging behind in financial

inclusivity. The banks have also embraced mobile banking agency services located in the

main trading centers. The financial services offered by mobile service providers have been

embraced by the community with agents located in almost all the trading centers and this has

greatly contributed to the deepening of financial services in the rural areas. Due to the

ongoing and anticipated major development activities being undertaken in the county, other

major banks have shown interest in setting base in the county to tap on the increased

economic activities.


1.13.1 Number of banks, Micro finance institutions, mobile money agents and

SACCOs with FOSAs


There are 15 operating Micro Finance Institutions operating in the county with offices mostly

in Mpeketoni. Lamu Teachers SACCO is the only SACCO receiving deposits and has

branches in five main trading centres. The most visible ones are listed as follows.


Table 11: Financial institutions in Lamu County


Commercial Banks

Kenya Commercial Bank Lamu and Mpeketoni

Equity Bank Lamu and Mpeketoni

Gulf African Bank Lamu

Diamond Trust Bank Lamu

African Banking Corporation Lamu

Cooperative Bank of Kenya Mpeketoni

SACCOs

Lamu Teachers Sacco Lamu, Mpeketoni, Hindi and Witu

Micro Finance Institutions

Kenya Women Finance Trust Mpeketoni

Faulu Microfinance Mpeketoni


31


Selic Capital Lamu

Yehu Microfinance Mpeketoni


Despite this showing in the financial service providers, Lamu still has 23.6 percent of the

population excluded from the formal financial services. In addition to these, the county has

44.5 percent of its bankable population being over 8 kilometers to the nearest banking

facility.


1.14 Environment and Climate Change

1.14.1 Major degraded areas/ hotspots and major contribution to environmental

degradation

Climate change is a reality especially for Lamu communities who draw their livelihoods from

natural environment. The pastoral areas of Tana River and Garrisa Counties dry lands have

become more and more unreliable for livestock keeping due to the slow but surely depletion

of its rangelands caused by erratic rainfalls patterns and overgrazing livestock population.

The situation is worsened by high evaporation rates as global temperatures rise. The 2009 and

2010 droughts are considered the worst in the last 30 years affected the communities in Lamu

especially the Orma who lost most of their livestock.


1.14.2 Environmental threat (loss of biodiversity, drought, floods, deforestation,

landslides, coastal and marine pollution, emergence of marine related diseases

and epidemic, invasive species


Ecosystems in Lamu County are under enormous pressure from increasing human population.

The population is extracting and using resources at an accelerated rate from a resource base

that is vulnerable and finite. The pressure on the natural resources is manifested in vegetation

removal; land and water resources degradation and pollution; overfishing and degradation of

fish habitats; competition for use of aquatic space; and changes in atmospheric processes,

such as climate change and its consequences. Proposed development initiatives such as an oil

refinery, LAPSSET, a coal powered plant and modern city area, by the government will have

far reaching consequences if proper strategic environmental assessments are not done.

The Encroachment on water catchment areas and wetlands, numerous water catchment areas

and wetland areas for example that of Shella sand dunes also under threat of being reclaimed

to human settlement. This is because of the encroachment by human beings onto the areas.


1.14.3 High spatial and temporal variability of rainfall


The topography of Lamu County is generally flat and prone to flooding during rain-storms.

Some areas within the mainland Lamu such as Mokowe are below sea levels as a result of the

areas being a limestone karst terrain. The highest areas are around Boni-Lungi. The area is

poorly drained and because of the karst terrain and the sand deposits, most of the runoff water

completely percolates into the ground. Because of this, there is poor surface and spring water

supply especially during the dry season. The highest average annual rainfall in Lamu County

is 1,200 mm along the coast and reduces to 600 mm inland at Bargoni, Pandanguo, Milimani

and Basuba areas. Lamu lies along the Equatorial Climate Systems where the weather is


32


characterized by two monsoon winds and warm climate. The mean annual potential

evaporation is high at 2,327 mm per year and the temperatures range between 24°C and

30°C. Generally and over the last 30 years, there has been an increase in both the annual

average rainfall and mean temperature in Lamu. The hottest months are December to April

while the coldest are May to July. The physiography influences settlement, road

infrastructure and farming.


1.14.4 Change in water levels


Due to severe drought experience last year the issue of climate change resulted the drying

up of lakes include: Lake Kenyatta, Lake Amu, ziwa la Luimshi, ziwa la Gambi, ziwa la

Kiboko, Ziwa la Kwakuomba, Ziwa la Roka, Ziwa la Kibokoni, Ziwa la Shalu, Ziwa la

Munkirio, Ziwa la Kombe, Zuiwa la Sendembe and Ziwa la Taa. When one superimposes the

rain pattern on this area you will notice that rain tends to reduce in intensity as you move

from Witu.


1.14.5 Solid waste management facilities


The waste management unit in Lamu is operating in major towns include; Amu, Mokowe,

Mpeketoni, Hindi and Witu. The waste management services have been traditionally

managed public health team across the County. Waste collection services majorly depend on

3 tractors with 4 hydraulic transportation trailers operating in Amu and Mpeketoni. The

County has only 2 secured disposal sites in Amu and Shella. The remaining towns lack

disposal sites.


The County lacks waste management policy, which is necessary for effective operation of the

section. There is also even lack of consolidated structure on solid wastes management. The

department is also challenged with human resource shortage including street orderlies.


1.15 Water and Sanitation


1.15.1 Hydrology and Geology


Lamu County is characterized by Quaternary to Recent sediments mainly of, limestone and

coral reef stones. It has distinct sandstone facies which formed from the Permo-

Carboniferous through the Tertiary in four Mega-sequences that show variation in grain sizes,

porosity, permeability, compaction, shaliness and cementation. This geology influence

groundwater availability. The hydrology of the area is highly influenced by the topography

and geology of the area with rivers flowing south easterly in a direction perpendicular to the

Indian Ocean coastline. Many of the streams are ephemeral draining into the limestone karsts

found in the area and therefore contributing to groundwater in the area. Lamu Island and a

significant area of Lamu’s coast is covered under sand dunes that are a catchment area for

groundwater that serves the settlements including Lamu Town with fresh water. These are

recharged directly from rainfall and seasonal runoff. The Lamu County water wells are also

influenced by recharge from the Tana River flowing south easterly inside Tana River country

and a few kilometres away from the border. Tana River is the largest river in Kenya and

enters the Indian Ocean at Kipini in the neighbouring Tana River County. The hydrology of

the Tana Delta influences the groundwater resources in the southern part of Lamu County.


33


1.15.2 Water Resources


Lamu County though a water scarce county has the following water resources/Aquifers


Table 12: Water respurces in the county

No. Resource/Aquifer Ward Sub-County

1. Shella Sandunes Shella Lamu West

2. Chomo Hindi Lamu West

3. Belebele Hindi Lamu West

4. Lake Kenyatta Bahari Lamu West

5. Witu Witu Lamu West

6. Vumbe Faza Lamu East

7. Mangai Basuba Lamu East


1.15.3 Water Supply Schemes

The following are the water supply schemes in Lamu County

Table 13: Water Supply Soucres in the County

No. Water Supply Scheme Ward Sub-County

1. Lamu Water Supply Mkomani Lamu West

2. Mokowe Water Supply Hindi Lamu West

3. Hindi Water Suuply (HIMWA) Hindi Lamu West

4. Mpeketoni Water Supply (LAKWA) Bahari Lamu West

5. Witu Water Supply (WIWA) Witu Lamu West

6. Faza Water Supply Faza Lamu East

7. Kiwayuu Water Supply Kiunga Lamu East

8. Milimani Water Supply Basuba Lamu East

9. Kizingitini Water Supply (Desalination) Faza Lamu East

10. Siyu Water Supply (Desalination) Faza Lamu East

11. Kiunga Water Supply (Desalination) Kiunga Lamu East


1.15.3 Water Sources and Access


Table 14: Water Sources and Access in the County

No. Water Sources Distance to the water

points (Km)

Sub-County

1. Piped Water 5 Lamu West

2. Local wells 0.29 Lamu West

3. Water pans 0.3 Lamu West

4. Water ponds 0.3 Lamu West


34


No. Water Sources Distance to the water

points (Km)

Sub-County

5. Djabias 0.2 Lamu East

6. Local wells 1.0 Lamu East

7. Piped water 2.0 Lamu East

8. Water pans 40 Lamu East

9. River 120 Lamu East


1.15.4 Water Management

Water Management is as stipulated in Water Acts 2002 and 2016, and also in 2010

Constitution that devolves water services to the County Governments.


1.15.5 Sanitation

Latrine/toilet coverage in Lamu County is still low, it stands at about 65%. The County does

not have sewerage system hence management of solid and liquid wastes is a big challenge.


1.16 Health Access and Nutrition


1.16.1 Access to Health Services


Lamu County is served by 45 health facilities of which 3 are referral hospitals, 4 health

centers, 29 dispensaries, one nursing home and eight private clinics. The bed capacity in the

health facilities stands at 172 with 145 beds in public facilities, 14 in mission/Non-

governmental Organizations and 13 beds in private health facilities.


Figure 5: Map showing the disctribution of public health facilities in the County

There are currently 18 medical doctors making a doctor population ratio of 1:7000, 48

clinical officers, clinical officer population ratio of 1:2800 and 158 nurses translating to a

nurse population ratio of 1:800.


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1.16.2 Morbidity: Five most Common Diseases in Order of Prevalence


The top common causes of outpatient morbidity amongst children below five years of age

are: upper respiratory tract infections (30%), diarrhea (11.9%), pneumonia (4.7%), fevers

(2.6%), earinfections (2%), intestinal worms (1.7%), tonsillitis (1.7%), eye infections (1.5%)

and other injuries (0.9%).


The causes of outpatient morbidity for residents older than five years include upper

respiratory tract infections(19.2%),skin diseases (8.9%), other respiratory diseases(6.5%),

diarrhea (5.5%),hypertension(3.5%), joint pains(2.5%), intestinal worms(2.5%),dental

disorders(2.2%), other injuries(1.9%) and pneumonia(1.4%).


The leading causes of mortality based on data collected for mortality survey through DHIS2

includes HIV/AIDS related (24.6%), diabetes (7%), hypertension (5.3%), anemia (5.3%),

psychosis (3.5%) and stroke (3.5%).


Malaria Control


Malaria which used to be the top cause of morbidity and mortality has shown tremendous

decline and no longer features among the ten common diseases. The county specific

prevalence is not available but the health facility data for parasite positivity rate place Lamu

at 2%. Deliberate efforts are being put to control the vector from biting the population. Mass

distribution of long lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) has been carried out every three

years to supplement the routine ones offered to children under one year and pregnant women.

The use of LLINs among pregnant women increased to 68% according to the 2015 Kenya

Malaria Indicator Survey. Routine data collected at the health facilities indicate that LLIN

distribution amongst pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics reached 110% in

2014/15, 94% 2015/16 and 110% in 2016/17. On the other hand, LLIN distribution to

children below 1 year of age attending child welfare clinics had coverage of 98%, 94% and

110% respectively.


HIV/TB Control


The prevalence of HIV in the county is estimated at 3.5% compared to the national average

of 6%. Lamu is one of the counties with the lowest burden of HIV according to the Kenya

AIDS Indicator Survey (2015). However the number of new cases of HIV has increased and

this is a great concern as most of the control efforts target counties with higher prevalence.


There is however a gap in linkage to care for those testing HIV positive. In the financial year

2014/15, 77.4% of the 310 clients who tested positive were linked to care. Meanwhile, in

2015/16 76.2% of the 315 who tested positive were linked to care and 93.5% of the 310 who

tested positive in 2016/17 were linked to care. There is therefore need to enhance the

mechanisms of getting back the HIV positive individuals not yet enrolled to care.


The number of tuberculosis (TB) cases detected has been increasing since 2014. A total of

204,263 and 293 cases were detected in 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17 respectively. This is

attributed to active case finding at both the facility and community levels. TB treatment

success rate has however declined from 92% in 2014 to 82% in 2017. Efforts need be

employed to trace clients who default and ensure they finish treatment as prescribed.

Community health volunteers (CHVs) and other partners need be supported to conduct


36


defaulter tracing. TB/HIV collaboration has enabled the identification and treatment of 99%

HIV positive TB patients. There are currently two patients on treatment for multidrug

resistant.


Non-Communicable Diseases


The prevalence of non-communicable diseases including hypertension, diabetes, cancers and

mental health conditions is on the increase. However, the response to this epidemiological

transition is still weak both in terms of health promotion and clinical management of those

diagnosed.


1.16.3 Nutrition Status


The STEPS Survey 2015 showed that the prevalence of overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m2)

and obesity (BMI>=30) among adults 15-69 years was high, especially among women. It

reported that 17.5% of men and 38.4% of women were either overweight (BMI 25-29.9) or

obese (BMI 30 or higher), and 13.7% of women and 4.3% of men were obese. According to

Lamu Smart survey (2017), 2.4% of children aged below five years are overweight. The

KDHS 2014 estimated a stunting rate for children below five years of 29%, wasting rate of

4% and 11% were underweight compared to the national average of 26%, 4% and 11%

respectively.


1.16.4 Immunization Coverage

Immunization coverage measures access and utilization of the services by the population. The

national end target for fully immunized children is 90% but Lamu County has observed a

declining trend. Immunization coverage was high with about 92% of infants being fully

immunized in 2014/2015 and went down to 84% in 2015/2016 and declined further to 77% in

2016/2017 .The Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) 2014 estimated a fully

immunized coverage of 64%. The declining trend has been occasioned by frequent

breakdown of cold chain equipment coupled with insecurity and industrial actions by health

care workers which disrupt service delivery. This calls for renewed efforts to improve

coverage such as defaulter tracing, program monitoring and integrated outreaches in hard to

reach areas of the county.


1.16.5 Access and Utilization of Reproductive Health Services

The number of women of reproductive age using modern family planning methods is 40%

(KDHS 2014). This is very low when compared to the national average of 53%. The use of

long term methods of family planning is also low and efforts to increase acceptance are

required. The county total fertility rate is 4.3 against the national average of 3.9.


Access to antenatal care is 96% in Lamu which is similar to the national average. However,

only 62% of pregnant women attend the recommended four antenatal clinic visits. The

national coverage is 58 % (KDHS 2014) reflecting low utilization of the services.


Deliveries by skilled birth attendants coverage stands at 47% against a national average of 62

% (KDHS 2014).The maternal mortality ratio is estimated at 676 per 100,000 live births


37


(KNBS 2009). The county is listed amongst fifteen counties that contribute to 60% of

maternal deaths in Kenya. The infant mortality rate (IMR) is reported as 76/1000 live births

(KNBS 2009).


1.16.6 Health Information Systems


The County Health Department has made deliberate efforts to improve the existing health

information system with the objective of collecting data to support monitoring disease trends,

programme performance, evaluate programme efficiency and effectiveness, planning,

budgeting among others. The county health facility reporting rate stands at 80% but the

quality of data collected is still wanting.


1.17 Education, Skills, Literacy and Infrastructure


The county’s population with ability to read stands at 69.8 per cent, with 69.85 per cent

having the ability to write. The population with the ability to both read and write is 67.3 per

cent.


1.17.1 Pre- School Education (Early Childhood Development Education)


There are 203 Early Childhood Development Education (ECDE) centres/classes in Lamu

County, 63 of which were constructed by the County Government of Lamu. There are also 3

special needs pre-schools namely: Tchundwa Special Unit for Mentally Handicapped;

Mokowe Arid Zone for Hearing Impairment; and Mokowe Special School for the Mentally

Handicapped. The county has also purchased and distributed chairs, tables, book shelves and

outdoor play equipment for the ECDE centres. So far, there are about 13,000 pupils enrolled

in all the ECDE centres. There are 478 teachers giving a teacher to pupil ratio of 1:27 (1

teacher: 27 pupils). The transition rate from pre-school to primary is very high (98%). The

completion rand retention rate stands at 99%.


Table 15: ECDE Enrollement and Enrollment Rates by County

Public Private % Private

Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total

Lamu 5,701 5,488 11,189 111.3% 97.9% 104.3% 93.6% 91.7% 92.6%

Kenya 1,543,482 1,476,383 3,019,866 75.7% 71.6% 73.6% 73.4% 70.4% 71.8%


Table 16: ECDE Enrollment by Public and Private Schools

Enrollment by Gender Gross Enrollment Rate
GER

Net Enrollment Rate

NER

Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total

Lamu 3,596 3,576 7,172 2,105 1,912 4,017 37% 35% 36%

Kenya 1,049,359 1,019,301 2,068,659 494,124 457,083 951,206 32% 31% 31%


38


Table 17: Public ECDE Enrolment by Levels and Gender

Boys Girls Total

Baby

Class

Nursery Pre

Unit

Baby

Class

Nursery Pre

Unit

Baby

Class

Nursery Pre

Unit

Lamu 1,087 1,398 1,111 1,118 1,360 1,098 2,204 2,758 2,210

Kenya 275,875 386,393 387,091 282,481 374,098 362,722 558,356 760,491 749,813


Table 18: Private ECDE Enrolment by Levels and Gender

Boys Girls Total

Baby

Class

Nursery Pre

Unit

Baby

Class

Nursery Pre

Unit

Baby

Class

Nursery Pre

Unit

Lamu 705 850 551 645 685 582 1,350 1,535 1,133

Kenya 159,045 164,770 170,308 145,328 153,956 157,799 304,373 318,727 328,107


1.17.2 Primary Education


There are 106 primary schools of which 91 are public schools and 15 schools are private.

There are 5 special needs primary schools within the county (Wiyoni School for Visual

Impaired, Lamu Special School, Mokowe Unit for Hearing impaired, Hongwe Special Unit

for Mentally Challenged and Tchundwa Special Unit). The county government has also

purchased desks, tables, constructed classrooms, play grounds, toilets etc. School enrolment

is 25688 in the county. The ratio is 1:40. The transition rate is 68%, the completion rate

currently stands at 87%, while the retention rate is 90%.


A total of 54% of Lamu County residents have primary level education. Lamu West

Constituency has the highest share of residents with primary level education which currently

at 55%. This is 7% points above Lamu East constituency, which has a relatively lower share

of residents with primary level education. Lamu West constituency is 1 percentage point

above the county average. Hongwe W has the highest share (65%) of residents with primary

levelof education. This is 25 percentage points above Basuba ward, which has the lowest

share of residents with primary education.


Table 19: Primary schools and average school size


Schools Enrollment Average school size

Public Private Total Public Private Total Public Private Total

Lamu 103 36 139 24,030 3,386 27,416 233 95 198

Kenya 21,718 7,742 29,460 8,359,488 1,591,258 9,950, 746 385 206 338


39


Table 20: Number of schools by accommodation category

Public Private Total

D D&B B D D&B B B D&B B

Lamu 98 3 1 32 0 0 130 3 1

Kenya 20,040 438 1,023 5,354 94 1,480 25,394 532 2,503

Key: D – Day only school; D&B – Day and Boarding school; B – Day school only


Table 21: Number of Schools by Gender

Public Private Total

Boys Girls Mixed Boys Girls Mixed Boys Girls Mixed

Lamu 3 2 97 0 0 32 3 2 129

Kenya 111 121 21,269 28 25 6,875 139 146 28,144


Table 22: Primary and Enrollment Rates

Enrolment GER NER

Boys Girls Total Boys

%

Girls

%

Total

%

Boys

%

Girls

%

Total

%

Lamu 14,055 13,361 27,416 124 108 115.7 93.4 83.9 88.5

Kenya 5,052,389 4,898,357 9,950,746 105.6 101.4 103.5 90.0 86.4 88.2


Table 23: Primary Share of Private Enrollment

Public Private %Private

Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total

Lamu 12,282 11,748 24,030 1,773 1,613 3,386 13% 12% 12%

Kenya 4,241,116 4,118,372 8,359,488 811,273 779,985 1,591,258 16% 16% 16%


Table 24: Total Primary Enrollment by Residence

Enrolment Teachers PTR

Public Private Total Public Private Total Public Private Total

Lamu 2,223 2,450 4,673 11,391 10,507 21,898 13,614 12,957 26,571

Kenya 755,870 748,217 1,504,087 4,095,125 3,954,660 8,049,785 4,850,995 4,702,877 9,553,872


40


Table 25: Public Primary Enrollment by Residence

Urban/Semi Urban Rural Total

Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total

Lamu 1,566 1,826 3,392 10,716 9,922 20,638 12,282 11,748 24,030

Kenya 450,044 455,060 905,104 3,791,072 3,663,312 7,454,384 4,241,116 4,118,372 8,359,488


Table 26: ECDE Teachers

Public Private Total

Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Lamu 09 292 301 02 175 177 11 467 478

Kenya 32100 30014 62114 13682 12392 26074 45782 42406 88188


Table 27: ECDE Pupil Teacher Ratio

Enrolment Teachers PTR

Public Private Total Public Private Total Public Private Total

Lamu 9503 3495 12998 301 177 478 1.30 1.27 2.57

Kenya 24,768 15,443 40,211 31.1 19.6 27.7 23.92 14.43 38.35


1.17.3 Non formal Education


Non-formal education is defined as any “an organized education activity operating outside

the established formal education system”. The definition also indicates that non-formal

education targets out of school children and youth below the age of 18 years. Looking at how

non-formal education curriculum is structured and delivered, it’s clear the focus is on

specialization, and acquisition of knowledge and skills required at the market place. This

system also encourages entrepreneurship, making learners self-reliant. In Lamu County there

are various non-formal institution. These include Dhow making, basketry and hats making,

mats making and henna painting skills. Majority of the learners are youth and adults who did

not undergo formal education system. In this specific non-formal education though practicing

they earn their leaving and undertake inter premiership programme.


1.17.4 Vocational Training Centres


Vocational Training Centres (VTCs) offer a route for acquisition of vocational skills,

knowledge, attitude, entrepreneurship and business skills, There are six VTCs in Lamu

county comprising the ones in Lamu, Mpeketoni, Witu, Kizingitini, Mokowe and Kiunga.


41


Apparently, the Kiunga VTCs is non-operational as it under renovations. The total enrolment

for both male and female stands at 745. The toal number of instructors is 30 out of these 12

have been employed by the county Government of Lamu and the rest by BOM. The cut

across courses offered in the institution include: Carpentry, masonry, fashion & design,

Beauty therapy Hotel & hospitality, Plumbing, Electrical Engineering, welding, motor

vehicle & mechanics, Agribusiness, and Entrepreneurship. The institutions operate at

certificate level up to grade I. the main body exams are NITA and KNEC.

Since inception, the VTCs have faced myriad challenges such as :

o Inadequate modern tools & equipment,
o Negative perception as institutions for failures and dropouts by the society hence low

enrolment,

o Inadequately trained and remunerated instructors,
o Inappropriate and obsolete skills imparted to trainees amongst others
o Inadequate funding,
o Inadequate infrastructure,
o Mismatch between training skills and labour market


1.17.5 Secondary Education


There are 25 secondary schools in the county, 22 are public schools while 3 are private. The

enrolment is 8686. The transition rate is 73%. The retention rate is 94% with a completion

rate of 87%. The total enrolment for secondary school in 2014 was projected to stand at 5,934

pupils composed of 3,462 boys and 2,460 girls. The gross enrolment rate in the county is 57.2

percent with net enrolment rate of 42.7 percent. The completion rate stands at 94 percent with

retention rate being 94 percent. There are 153 teachers giving a teacher to pupil ratio of 1:18.


Only 13% of Lamu County residents have secondary level of education or above. Lamu West

constituency has the highest share of residents with secondary level of education or above at

15%. This is almost twice Lamu East constituency, which has the lowest share of residents

with secondary or above. Lamu West constituency is 2 percentage points above the county

average. Bahari ward has the highest share of residents with secondary level of education or

above at 20%. This is 19 percentage points above Basuba ward, which has the lowest share of

residents with a secondary level of education or above. Bahari ward is 7 percentage points

above the county average.


A total of 33% of Lamu County residents have no formal education. Lamu East constituency

has the highest share of residents with no formal education at 44%. This is 14 percentage

points above Lamu West constituency, which has the lowest share of residents with no formal

education. Lamu East constituency is 11 percentage points above the county average. Basuba

ward has the highest percentage of residents with no formal education at 59%. This is three

times Bahari ward, which has the lowest percentage of residents with no formal education.

Basuba ward is 26 percentage points above the county average.


1.17.6 Tertiary Education


Lamu County provides adult education in the following programmes: basic literacy, adult

continuing education primary and adult continuing education secondary with an enrolment of

819 both male and female learners. There are 2 community learning resource centres in the


42


county namely: Mpeketoni and Kilimani Community Learning Resource Centres. There are 3

satellite campuses in Lamu County: Technical University of Mombasa, Kenya Medical

Training College and Kenya Institute of Professionals Studies. There 6 Vocational Training

Centres in Lamu County at Lamu, Mokowe, Witu, Mpeketoni, Kizingitini and Kiunga. The

county has also constructed classrooms, workshops, toilets and playing grounds and

administration blocks. The courses offered are carpentry and joinery, masonry, plumbing,

electrical installation, welding, ICT, fashion and design, motor vehicle mechanic and beauty

therapy. There are 1,225 (male 746, female 479) students and 25 tutors. The ratio is 1:50.


1.17.7 Adult and continuing Education


There are 1,664 adult learners enrolled in adult programmes with 1,073 in basic literacy, 91

in post literacy, 25 registered for KCPE, 132 in proficiency exam and 205 are enrolled in

non-formal programme. There are about 58 centres with a total of 38 teachers; seven

employed permanently.


1.17.8 Quranic schools & Madrasa

Islamic education takes place in Mosques, Madrasas and Qur‘anic schools. Qur‘anic schools

have existed since the arrival of Islam with almost all Mosques having a Qur‘anic school

attached to them. Usually all children, both boys and girls of primary school age, attend

Qur‘anic schools and get basic Islamic education. Boys may continue for many years but

girls tend to leave when they reach the age of ten or eleven. Islamic education, i.e the

Qur‘anic schooling and Madrasa are designed to address first and foremost the spiritual needs

of the learners and to offer them avenues for growth in the faith.


This type of education emerged in response to the divine mandate expressed in the Qur‘an

and is a means for disseminating and deepening the learner‘s knowledge of the Islamic faith.

Qur‘anic schooling occupies a significant place in the education and upbringing of Muslim

children. Islam emphasizes on the significance of education in the life of a believer. The

institution has various level for the beginner, alimentary, intermediate and advance.


Some Muslim organizations and individual entrepreneurs have established what are referred

to as ̳Islamic Integrated schools in Lamu County. The Integrated schools as the name

suggests, combines the Islamic education curriculum and secular/Western systems of

education. The schools operate on the ideals of producing all-rounded and morally upright

individuals who can serve as good example for the society as they learn the principles of

Islamic religion as well asexcel in their day to day affairs in a globalized world.


There are various Quranic schools madrasa school in Lamu county. Most of these institutions

are largely found in Lamu west specificaly in Lamu east and amu division. The instructors

are trained locally and some further their education in arab countries. Some of the challenges

includes: lack of teaching & learning resources, lack of funds, lack adequate of trained

personnel among others.


1.18 Talent Academies


43


There are no talent academies in Lamu County. However, we plan to construct 2 in the next 5

years, one per sub-county.


1.19 Sports facilities


There are 4 community sports grounds in Lamu County, namely: Twaifu ground in Mkomani

ward, Muungano ground in Mpeketoni, Hindi stadium at Sabasaba in Hindi ward and

Mkunumbi stadium. There are many more, most of which are in primary and secondary

schools and some which are privately owned.


1.20 Public Benefits Organizations


These include Non overnmental Organizations (NGOs), Community Based Organizations

(CBOs), special intrest groups among others.


1.20.1 Non-Governmental Organizations


There are 19 active Non-Governmental Organizations operating in the county. These NGOs

are involved in various activities that include; capacity building, civic education, poverty

eradication, HIV and AIDs campaigns, women empowerment, disaster preparedness and

protection of marine ecosystem. These NGOs includes; APHIA Plus, ANIDAN, World

Vision, Agakhan Foundation, Red Cross, Muslims for Human Rights, Zinduka Afrika,

AMREF, and WWF.


1.20.2 Self Help, Women and Youth Groups


There are 9,649 registered groups in Lamu County: 4,770 self-help groups, 2,966 women

groups, 67 groups for persons with disabilities, 1,692 youth groups and 154 Community

Based Organizations (CBOs) as per 30% June 2018. These groups undertake a diverse range

of activities which are influenced by among other factors, programmes and projects being

implemented by the government, civil society and non-state actors. These programmes

include; Youth Enterprise Development Fund, Women Enterprise Development Fund,

Poverty Eradication Commission Fund, Drought Management Programme and Total War on

HIV and AIDS.


1.21 Development Partners


In Lamu conty, thre are a number of Development partners who support various initiatives.

These include the World Bank, which supports capacity building of county staff in areas such

as performance management, monitoring and evaluation. USAID has been very instrumental

through its AHADI programme where Lamu County has benefitted immensely. Worth

mentioning is their support towards the development of this plan (CIDP, 2018 -2022) where

AHADI financed several workshops that provided the technical teams had a good

environmenta to carefully plan for the next five years. The programme also provided a lead

expert on planning who guided the entire planning process. Ahadi equally facilitated the

sessions between the executive and the Assembly that provided a good platform for review

and ultimate approval of the Lamu County CIDP for 2018 - 2022. Other Development

partners include, DANIDA and WWF. Safaricom’s unique support in the area of maternal

health has been instrumental in the provision of the much needed health services.


44


CHAPTER 2: LINKAGES WITH VISION 2030 AND OTHER PLANS


2.1 ‘Introduction


The County Integrated Development plan lays out the strategies and the institutional

framework that the county has identified as the vehicle to achieve it development goals and

objectives. This being the second generation CIDP for the Lamu County, it is prepared on the

basis of constitutional and legislative backing of the Kenya constitution 2010, Financial

Management Act 2013, County Governments Act 2012 and Urban areas and Cities Act.


2.2 CIDP Linkage with the Kenya Vision 2030 and Medium Term Plan


The Kenya Vision 2030 is the national long-term development policy that aims to transform

Kenya into a newly industrializing, middle-income country providing a high quality of life to

all its citizens by 2030. Kenya Vision 2030 is a product of highly participatory, consultative

and inclusive stakeholder’s process conducted throughout the country and in all sectors of the

economy.


The Constitution of 2010 and the County Government Act 2012 calls for county plans to be

aligned to the National Vision and Development plans. In this regard, efforts have been made

to link the Lamu CIDP to the Kenya Vision 2030 and its five year Medium Term Plans. This

CIDP provides linkages with the three Vision 2030 pillars as per table 30 below to ensure

realization of Kenya Vision 2030 for the benefit the citizens.


Table 28: CIDP linkages with the Kenya vision 2030


Pillar Flagship Project within

the County

County Strategies to Implement Vision

2030

1. Economic

Pillar: to maintain

a sustained

economic growth

of 10% p.a. The

pillar covers

• Improvement Project
• Harnessing anticipated

potential occasioned by

the LAPSSET corridor

and Lamu Resort City

Modernization of all

towns in Lamu

• Private investment
attraction

• Agro-food Processing
Programme;

Construction of fruit

processing plant

• Revenue Allocation
and generation;

Revenue Automation

system


• Use cooperatives to spur growth such as
promotion of Women, Youth and

General Traders Saccos; and value

addition of produce

• End Wanton misuse of public funds
• Encourage Public Participation in

development initiatives

• Encourage partnerships and networking
to mobilise resources

• To achieve an average economic growth
rate of more than 10% per annum and

sustaining the same until 2030 and

beyond

• Establishment of modern trade kiosks

• Promotion of livestock enterprise

• Implement the County Spatial Plan
• Provide security of land tenure by the

facilitation of the adjudication process

2. Social Pillar: a
just and cohesive

society enjoying

• Lamu Youth Brigade

• Creation of
Programmes that

• To engender just, cohesive and
equitable social development in a clean

and secure environment,


45


Pillar Flagship Project within

the County

County Strategies to Implement Vision

2030

equitable social

development in a

clean and secure

environment

support PWDs engaged

in business, agriculture

and other economic

activities.

• Supporting cultural
festivals

• Identification and
promotion of

monuments considered

iconic and having

cultural and heritage

attributes unique to

Lamu County.

• School feeding
programme for the

ECDE learners

• Establishment of model
vocational training

centres and special

needs intervention for

Education and Training

• Women Empowerment.

• Building and
Rehabilitation of Sports

Stadia.

• Rehabilitation and
Protection of the Water

towers and catchment

areas.

• Develop our human capital through
skills and education

• Protect our human capital through
increased access to affordable health for

all citizens

• Protect our environment
• Enhanced security through

collaboration with National

Government

• Enhance delivery of efficient Public
services

• Eradicate Nepotism
• Equitable distribution of Resources
• Establishment of a powerful Ministry

of Youth to empower youth through

talent development, sports and

formation of Lamu Youth Brigade


3. Political Pillar-

an issue-based,

people oriented,

result centered and

accountable

democratic

political system

• Leadership, Ethics and
Integrity; Formation of

Sub-County

Development

Committees and Ward

Development

Committees to enrich

the CIDP projects at the

ward levels

• Development of
LAMU long term

development blue print.

• Implementation of
Constitution and Legal

Reforms; Media

broadcast in County

Assembly.

• To realize an Issue-based, People-
centered result oriented and

accountable democratic system.

• To end Corruption in all departments
and the County at large

• Introduce people-focused new levels of
devolved governance. The new

institutional structure for devolved

governance includes:

• Sub-county Development
Committees

• Ward Development Committees


2.3 CIDP Alignment with 2010 Constitution of Kenya


46


The Constitution of Kenya, which is the basis for the process of devolution in Kenya, has

integrated county planning as a key aspect of the development process. This is because

proper planning ensures that counties use limited resources wisely to address the unlimited

needs of the citizens. All plans are to be generated by the county executive with the approval

of the county assembly. Under Schedule 4 of the Constitution of Kenya, that enshrines the

distribution of functions between the National Government and the County Governments, the

responsibility of county planning and development is vested to county governments who are

expected to decide before hand what will be their short, medium and long term priorities.


The process of arriving at those priorities should be one that fully incorporates meaningful

public participation as anchored in Article 196(1) (b) of the constitution. The Article

mandates the county assembly to facilitate public participation and involvement in the

legislative and other business of assembly and its committees. Article 220(2) of the

Constitution also posits that, the National government shall prescribe the structure of

development plans and budgets of counties. As such this CIDP has been developed through a

rigorous participatory process adhering to the guidelines for preparation of CIDP 2018 -

20122 provided by the Ministry of Devolution and Planning.


The Article also provides a mechanism that will be followed in consultation with the National

government and final submission of the draft plans to the County Assembly for approval. In

the development of this second LAMU County CIDP, due diligence has been exercised to

ensure compliance constitution and the provided guidelines. The final stage for the

development of the 2018 – 2022 CIDP was submission of the Draft CIDP by the Executive,

to the Lamu County Assembly through Article 185(4) of the Constitution of Kenya. The

Article under Section 4(a) mandate the County assembly to receive and approve plans and

policies for the management and exploitation of the county’s resources.


2.4 CIDP Alignment to Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), 2012


The Public Financial Management (PFM) Act 2012 provides for effective and efficient

management of public resources. To enhance transparency and accountability in management

of public funds, Lamu County Government has embraced Integrated Financial Management

System (IFMIS); public participation during budgeting process; adherence to timelines for

the budget process and procurement procedures. PFMA Act 2012 section 125 of the Act

requires the budgeting process of county governments in any financial year to consist of

integrated development planning which includes the long term planning and medium term

planning as well as financial and economic priorities for the county over the medium term.

CIDP serves as central tool that informs the budget making process.


PFM Act also defines the specifics that the CIDP should enumerate in detail, highlighting the

importance of monitoring and evaluating process. This responsibility to prepare the CIDP

rests with the County Executive responsible for planning and the law requires that it must

presented to the county assembly by September 1, every year (sec 126(3)). County

Government Act 2012 section 107 specifically mentions what plans each county shall prepare

that shall guide its development activities.


2.5 CIDP Alignment to Intergovernmental Relations Act, 2012


Intergovernmental Relations Act, 2012, provides a framework for consultation and

establishment of institutional structures and mechanisms for intergovernmental relations and


47


cooperation between the national and county governments. This ensures existence of a

framework for inclusive consideration of any matter that affects relations between the two

levels of governance. Furthermore, it aids in coordination of projects between county

government and national government as well as provide mechanisms for the resolution of

intergovernmental disputes where they arise.


Part II of the Intergovernmental Relations Act, 2012, establishes the Summit responsible for

monitoring of county development plans and recommending appropriate action. Section 12 of

the Act also establishes the Intergovernmental Relations Technical Committee (IGRTC)

which provides secretariat services to the Summit and Council of Governors. In addition,

Section 20(f) established the Council of Governors with a mandate to coordinate the

receiving of reports and monitoring the implementation of inter-county agreements on inter-

county projects. Deliberate efforts have been made by the county government to form

consultation and participation structures drawing membership from both the County and

National Government players. This will enhance intergovernmental relations at the County

level.


2.6 CIDP Link to County Government Act (2012)


CGA Act (2012) lays the responsibility to prepare the CIDP rests with the County Executive

responsible for planning and the law requires that it must be presented to the county assembly

by September 1, every year (sec 126(3)). County Government Act 2012 section 107

specifically mentions what plans each county shall prepare that shall guide its development

activities. The Act also requires the CIDP to be prepared in a participatory process. This was

strictly adhered to during the preparation process.


2.7 CIDP Alignment with National Government Big Four


The National Government has developed key pillars that are aimed at transforming Kenya

economically. The four areas famously referred as the “Big Four” include food security,

affordable housing, manufacturing and affordable and universal healthcare.


At the global level, the Big Four Agenda is effectively aligned to the 2030 Agenda for

Sustainable Development, upon which the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

are anchored. At the continental level, the Big Four Agenda aligns well with Africa’s Agenda

2063 themed “The Africa We Want”. This agenda sets out Africa’s aspirations for

development by 2063 and is founded on the desire for shared prosperity and well-being, for

unity and aspiration, for inclusive growth and people-driven sustainable development.

Whereas the National Government still retains the policy function in agriculture, housing,

energy, health and national public works, devolution of agriculture, health services, county

planning and housing, and energy regulation, place counties at the center in the

implementation of the Big Four Agenda. To start with the National Government rolled out

capacity building for counties where technical support was provided to enable Counties

develop comprehensive County Integrated Development Plans (CIDPs) for the 2018-2022

planning cycle. Secondly, National Government is strengthening strategic partnership with all

the counties, supporting the counties in restructuring technical and operational infrastructure,

help operationalize strategies aimed at enhancing counties to own revenues sources,

broadening the tax bases and eliminating loopholes for tax avoidance.


48


Food security remains the main promise of the current County Government of Lamu

administration. Implementation of the Governor’s manifesto, which aims at making Lamu

great, will ensure that there is sufficient water for irrigated farming, through use of modern

technology. The County will enhance cooperation with the national government in

construction of Mega dams to provide irrigation water for the entire County. In addition,

through implementation of the Governor’s manifesto, the County plans to invest 20% of

County revenue in Agriculture for food security. Finally, the County Government is also

enhancing partnerships and cooperation with donors/development partners promote

Agriculture.

In housing, the National Government plans to have an estimated 500,000 Kenyans own

houses, the government will reduce the cost of mortgages and cut the cost of construction.

This will be achieved through reducing the cost on mortgages and construction materials. In

promoting access to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade

slums the Lamu County Government shall collaborate with the national government, the

private and other development partners to construct low cost housing in the County. Efforts

will also go to promotion of building technologies and practices through establishment of

training centres to capacity build the LAMU residents. The new technologies will then be

used to provide affordable public infrastructure.


In manufacturing sector, the National Government aims to boost four manufacturing sub-

sectors namely; Agro-Processing, Leather and Textiles. The County is also collaborating with

the National Government in developing viable processing zones for locally available

resources, hence attracting investors. The County Government of Lamu will seek

partnerships with manufacturers and industrialists to process and market agricultural

products. In addition, the County seeks to establish Special Economic Zones/Industrial parks

and Sub County Industrial Centers. This will be through provision of infrastructure,

equipment and tools for facilitating value addition.


The national Government will ensure secure universal medical care by undertaking major

policy and administrative reforms in the medical sector and strong collaboration with the

National Government Ministry of Health, the NHIF (National Hospital Insurance Fund) and

private sector medical insurance providers. In regards to this, the County Government of

Lamu will mobilize all County residents to register with the NHIF to benefit from this

scheme. In addition, the County plans to enroll all county residents NHIF thus ensuring their

access to medical care. The CIDP through the Implementation of the Governor’s Manifesto

will cater for free medical care for PLWDs. The County will in addition ensure adequate

drugs and other health supplies in all health facilities. The County will also establish an ICU

and cancer unit in LTRH, with the aim of cutting the cost of seeking treatment for its

citizenry. In addition, the County will also support provision promotive and preventive health

care through community led and Public Health Education.


2.8 CIDP linkage with the New Government Manifesto/Policy


Following the change of administration after the last general elections (August 2017), the

new administration has articulated its policy through a manifesto under ‘Making Lamu Great’

theme. The following are key areas of focus to inform planning under the new administration.


1. New structure of Governance. The new government of LAMU County will be
accessible to all; it will be consultative and involve the people and their leaders in

decision-making, right from the Ward to County level. Sub-County Development


49


Boards, Ward Development Boards. This will ensure that the projects captured in the

CIDP are based on community needs as identified during the ward level public

participation foras.

2. Provision of water in the county e.g. Lamu East wards including Kiunga,faza and
Basuba. The flagship projects here include desalination plants, tapping water from

River Tana among others and conservation and protection of water towers

3. Improved Agriculture- flagship projects here include irrigated farming.
4. Tourism-Flagships here to include Launch of Lamu cultural festivals, put more funds

for investment in Lamu cultural festivals.

5. Education where the key flagship project is introduction of school feeding programme
in ECDE all centers and provision of free ECDE education for all children

6. Road construction where key flagship projects entail murraming all county roads,
Ensure quality construction of roads, Use labour intensive methods for maintenance

of county roads to create more employment for our youth, Establish Lamu County

Roads Board in collaboration with KERRA and KURRA and Lobby National

Government to maintain their roads

7. Health-Some of the flagship projects include: increased Investment in public health
education, Improving working environment for health workers, Ensure adequate and

proper usage of drugs for all health facilities & Get involved in talks with the nurses

to end the strikes,ISO certification and universal health care programme.

8. Towns modernization –flagship projects to include -Modernization of all towns in
Lamu , Ensure growth of our towns by provision of water & construction of toilets

and laying cabros; provide funds for not yet established markets , establishment of

town committees/boards

9. Entrepreneurship and Attraction of Private Investment
10. Youth- flagship projects include -Establishment of a powerful and well-resourced

youth ministry, Establish Lamu Youth Brigade (LYB) - this will ensure that all youths

get technical skills to be involved in drilling of boreholes, dams and water pans.

11. Support People Living With Disabilities (PLWD) through creation of programmes
that support and engage them in business, agriculture and other economic activities.

12. Promotion of Lamu culture and tradition-Support culture even to the diaspora, where
an n annual Lamu cultural festival will be supported to showcase culture, music, and

dance and lamu foods festivals .

13. Environmental Conservation where projects include:planting of mangroves and other
terestial tree species to boost Lamu county forest cover and conserve water catchment

areas.


2


2.9 CIDP Linkage with SDGs

Table 30 shows the linkage between the CIDP and the SDGs


Table 29: CIDP Linkage with Sustainable Development Goals

GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

GOAL 1: No

Poverty

Ending poverty

in all its forms

• Provision of water in all the wards,

• Improving agriculture and cash for all households,

• Providing education for all our children,

• Offering better health care services for all,

• Promotion of entrepreneurship and attract private investments in the county

• The Investment Corporation to work on value addition projects aiming to create
employment and generate wealth

• Prevention and control of Livestock diseases

• Control of animal disease vectors and pests

• Process and market milk for the dairy farmers.

• Give out loans to the members for various personal developments.

• Embarked on reducing poverty amongst the farmers by forming cooperatives and
fruit processing plant in the county

• A continued and deliberate emphasis of linking the producer with the market.

Governor’s Office,

Education

Agriculture and Water

Finance

Fisheries, Livestock and

Cooperative Development

Trade, Investment,

Industrialization, Tourism and

Cooperative Development

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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

GOAL 2: Zero

Hunger

End hunger,

achieve food

security and

improved

nutrition and

promote

sustainable

agriculture

• Entrenching Financing of agribusiness within the lending model.

• Making agriculture profitable by offering farmers better prices

• Support farmers with certified genetic materials (seeds, seedlings, fingerlings and
semen)

• Promote diversification of crops, livestock and fish species.

• Promote interventions on on-farm soil and water conservation and management

• Promote entrepreneurship and value addition within the agricultural sector for
crops, Fish and Livestock

• Enforcement of regulations and standards and coordination of Agriculture,
Livestock and Fisheries Sub sectors for public good.

• Package and disseminate appropriate agricultural technologies to farmers,
cooperatives and other organisations to address food security, income generation

and wealth creation.

• Capacity build Farmers through trainings

• Build resilience of pastoral and agro-pastoral communities to calamities such as
drought and floods

• Promote Artificial Insemination services to upgrade livestock into high milk and
meat producing breeds

• Promote Livestock Insurance

Finance


Agriculture


Fisheries, cooperative and

livestock

GOAL 3: Good

Health and

Well-being

Ensure healthy

• Access to free service at public health facilities

• Improving maternal health care

• Provision of drugs in all health centres

Health Services

Fisheries, Livestock and Co-

operatives

http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal2.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal2.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal3.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal3.html
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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

lives and

promote well-

being for all at

all ages

• Registration of all county citizens under NHIF Cover

• Improve quality and safety of livestock products

• To promote safe interaction between humans, animals and the environment

GOAL 4:

Quality

Education

• Provide meals and nutrition to early childhood Development Education for
improvement of health

• Employment of more ECDE teachers

• Construction of ECDE classrooms

• Provide capitation all ECDE learners

• ICT integration in ECDE centers

• Employment of more youth polytechnic instructors.

• Construction of more workshops and hostels in Vocational training centres.

• Equipping all the VTCs with tools and equipment.

• Disbursement of capitation to all trainees

• Offering well structured loans specific to finance education to the low income
earners.

• Collaboration with training institutions to establish ICT centers.

• Establishment MYS that will offer technical training in youth polytechnics

Education


GOAL 5:

Gender

Equality

• Facilitating and coordinating gender mainstreaming activities in the county

• Monitoring progress of gender mainstreaming in the county

• Training women, youth and persons with disabilities on 30% Government Tender
Rule and monitoring and ensuring that all county departments adhere to Access to

Government Procurement Opportunities (AGPO) for women, youths and PWDs

Department of Gender, Youth

Affairs and Social Services.

Finance, strategy and

Economic Planning

County Public Service board

http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal4.html
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http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal4.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal5.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal5.html
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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

• Ensuring access of County Social Support (Women Empowerment Fund, Youth
Development Fund and Disability Fund) and loans for women, youth and persons

with disabilities

• Observation of two third gender rule and implemention the National Government
policy on gender main streaming which provides equal opportunities of

employment for all.

• Ensuring that not more than two thirds of the members appointed in the institution
in the county are not of the same gender

Public service management


GOAL 6: Clean

Water and

Sanitation

• Rehabilitate and protect water towers in the County in conjunction with the
national government

• Provide sufficient water for irrigated farming

• Construct sewerage systems for Amu, Mokowe ,Mpeketoni ,Faza and other
Towns to promote sanitation services in the respective areas

• Ensuring access to clean water for domestic use and consumption

• Rehabilitation of Djambias

• Construction of Desalination plants in county

Water and irrigation

GOAL 7:

Affordable and

Clean Energy

• The county government in conjunction with other agencies i.e. KPLC, REA
intends to install transformers to ensure all the household have access to electricity

by 2030.

Lands Roads, Transport and

Energy


GOAL 8:

Decent Work

and Economic

Growth

• Financing SMEs to steer growth hence creating employment

• Investment in renewable energy, value addition, real estate, hospitality shall create
productive employment, economic growth and transformation

• Achieve full and productive employment

• Substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education and
training

• Engagement of Youth in labour intensive projects of the county.

Finance

Youth Affairs & Sport

Trade, Investment,

Industrialization, Tourism and

Cooperative Development


http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal6.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal6.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal6.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal7.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal7.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal7.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal8.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal8.html
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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

• Create synergies with agriculture for promotion of agro tourism and local tourism
service provider sectors to increase revenue and development of basic

infrastructure.

• Support and train community based tourism organizations to develop skills and
strengthen the local economy.

• Promotion of micro and small enterprises as an alternative form of employment
and business creation.

• Through capacity building prospective and practicing entrepreneurs are counseled
and trained on sustainability of their enterprises. In some instances the

entrepreneurs are supported through provision of tools and equipment.

GOAL 9:

Industry,

Innovation and

Infrastructure

• Establishment of County connectivity and backbone infrastructure to enhance
service delivery communication and innovation.

• Build resilient infrastructure,

• promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation,

• The construction of market facilities

• The County Government is in process of building market kiosks for the purpose of
regulating

• Improve quality of hides and skins produced

Roads, Transport and Energy

Trade, Investment,

Industrialization andTourism

Development

Fisheries Livestock and Co-

operatives


GOAL 10:

Reduced

Inequality

• Ensuring that appointment in all the institution in the county represent regional
balance

Legal Affairs,

Public Service Management

and Administration

Public service board.

GOAL 11:

Sustainable
• Improve access to decent and affordable housing in the informal settlements in

LAMU,.

Legal Affairs, Public Service

Management and

http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal9.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal9.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal9.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal9.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal10.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal10.html
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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

Cities and

Communities
• Construct inclusive bus parks and stages in all the towns

• Develop plans for efficient and inclusive town transport systems

• Hold town hall meetings to give the citizens opportunities to participate in
development and management of the towns

• Establish recreation parks and promote recreation/entertainment activities

• Develop, equip and implement efficient liquid and solid waste management
systems in all the towns

• Implement County spatial plan.

• Ensuring the entire county has spatial plan to guide and harmonize development
activities and ensure enironmental sustainability. Further the department will

prepare sub Counties, wards and urban areas spatial plans.

• In promoting access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic
services and upgrade slums the department shall collaborate with the national

government, the private and other development partners to promote the adoption of

building technologies and practices through establishment training centres to

capacity built the LAMU residents as well as using these technologies to provide

affordable public infrastructure.

• The department shall support LAMU residents including through financial and
technical assistance, in building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local

materials.

• Through planning the department shall provide access to safe, affordable,
accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably

by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in

vulnerable situations, women, and children, persons with disabilities and older

persons .

• The department shall establish direct participation structure of civil society in
urban planning and management that operate regularly and democratically through

creation of towns and urban boards/committee. The department shall endeavor to

create clean and green towns through provision of recreational spaces, parks, open

Administration


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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

areas and other public spaces in particular for women and children, older persons

and persons with disabilities. The department will identify, plan, purchase and set

aside land for waste management and partner with private investors to establish an

integrated waste management system that can generate wealth and environmental

health.

• The department will support positive economic, social and environmental links
between urban, peri-urban and rural areas by strengthening national and regional

development planning.

• The department will create awareness about the importance plan preparation and
implementation to all urban residents in LAMU County to ensure ownership and

expedite the process of planning and implementation of the Plan thereof.

• The department shall localize the National spatial Plan through the preparing
county spatial plan and other urban plans to ensure the county takes advantage of

national strategic projects through creation of special urban areas like gateway

town, economic zones, industrial parks, as well as planning for integrated transport

and infrastructural systems. This shall be anchored on


GOAL 12:

Responsible

Consumption

and Production

Take urgent

action to combat

climate change

and its impacts

• Enforcement of regulations and standards and coordination of Agriculture,
Livestock and Fisheries Sub sectors for public good.

• Package and disseminate appropriate agricultural technologies to farmers,
cooperatives and other organisations to address food security, income generation

and wealth creation.

• Promote community consciousness on Animal welfare issues


Agriculture

Fisheries, Livestock and Co-

operatives

GOAL 13:

Climate Action
• Promote efficient water use by promoting drip irrigation and other climate smart

agriculture technologies.

Agriculture

Environment, Wildlife and

natural resources

GOAL 14: Life • Encouraging fish farming across the county Fisheries

http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal12.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal12.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal12.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal12.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal13.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal13.html
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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

Below Water

Conserve and

sustainably use

the oceans, seas

and marine

resources for

sustainable

development

GOAL 15: Life

on Land
• Creation of awareness raising activities for conservation of flora and fauna and

preservation of biodiversity

• Capacity building for tourism service providers on ways to reduce waste and
consumption.

• Develop tourism products that promote sustainability.

• Draft, enact and enforce Livestock/Rangeland management policies and bills that
promote limit degradation of rangelands


Trade, Investment,

Industrialization andTourism

Development

Environment, Wildlife and

natural resources

Fisheries, Livestock and Co-

operatives

GOAL 16:

Peace and

Justice Strong

Institutions

• Ensuring equitable distribution of resources across the county, conduction of
county cultural events,

• Fostering good relationship with neighboring counties.

• Establish systems for corruption-free county public service through capacity
building and development and implementation of transparent systems

• Undertake customer satisfaction surveys to determine citizen satisfaction index to
inform citizen-responsive programmes

• Develop and implement inclusive civic education programmes

Governor’s Office

Legal Affairs,

Public Service Management

and Administration


GOAL

17: Partnerships

to achieve the

Goals

• Establishment of the External Affair and Linkages Directorate at the Office of the
Governor

• Establishing partnerships to facilitate development of policies & plans; capacity
building and revolving capital- get other areas of partnership

Governors Office and

Finance, Economic Planning

http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal14.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal15.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal15.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal16.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal16.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal16.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal16.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal17.html
http://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal17.html
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GOAL COUNTY STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT

• Automating services and customization for easy access


11


2.10 CIDP Alignment with Agenda 2063

The linkage between the CIDP and Agenda 2063 is highlighted in Table 31.

Table 30: Linkage Between CIDP and Agenda 2063

Aspiration County Strategy To Achieve The Aspiration Responsible

Department

Aspiration 1. A prosperous

Africa based on inclusive

growth and sustainable

development

• Promotion of small business through training and giving loans.

• Bringing in private investors into the county to create opportunities for business

and employment.

• Provide capitation all ECDE learners

• Equipping all the VTCs with tools and equipment.

• Disbursement of capitation to all trainees

• Develop and diversify sustainable tourism products such as ecotourism, agro

tourism and sustainable community based tourism organizations.

• Establishment of conservancy to conserve our grazing area and its ecosystem

• Promoting a clean and healthy environment for all citizens

• Promotion of entrepreneurship and value addition within the agricultural sector

for crops, Fish and Livestock.

• Promote interventions on on-farm soil and water conservation and management.

• Package and disseminate appropriate agricultural technologies to farmers,

cooperatives and other organisations to address food security, income generation

and wealth creation.


To achieve the above targets, the following indicative strategies will have to be

considered.

Finance, Economic

Planning Education,

Technology, Gender,

Culture and Social

development

Trade, Investment,

Industrialization,

Tourism and

Cooperative

Development

Health

Lands, Physical

planning, Urban

development and

Public Works

Agriculture Livestock

Development and

Fisheries


12


Aspiration County Strategy To Achieve The Aspiration Responsible

Department

• Develop / implement policies for public-private partnership in urban housing

construction/renewal and increased home ownership.

• Develop / implement policies for slum prevention, reduction and upgrading

• Develop/ implement policies for improved urban and territorial planning, land

tenure, use and management systems

• Develop/improve the regulatory framework, expand infrastructure, and build the

capacity of the citizenry for enhanced affordable access to the basic necessities of

life: water, sanitation, electricity, transport and internet services.

• Fully implement the Africa Water Vision and its sequel.

• Establish water tariff systems that address cross-subsidy and the needs of the

poor.

• Develop / implement policies and programmes for private, public-private

partnerships in investment of transport systems in small Island States

• Develop/implement policies for the growth of urban waste recycling industries

• Facilitate the process of determining and assuring tenure rights to increase

productivity and booster investor confidence.

Aspiration 2. An integrated

continent, politically united and

based on the ideals of Pan

Africanism and vision of

Africa’s Renaissance

Ensuring all-inclusive capacity building of employees and citizenry depending on the

needs.

Legal Affairs, Public

Service Management

and Administration

Aspiration 3. An Africa of

good governance, democracy,

respect for human rights,

justice and the rule of law

• Develop and implement gender and rights-based programmes and projects that

will uphold inclusivity, equity and participation among the citizens.

• Promoting the values referred to in Article 10 and 232 of the Constitution of

Legal Affairs, Public

Service Management

and Administration


13


Aspiration County Strategy To Achieve The Aspiration Responsible

Department

Kenya 2010.

Aspiration 4. A peaceful and

secure Africa
• Promote policies that will increase access to finance by Women for graduation

from informal sector to the SME sector

• Industrializing the county by capitalizing on the County’s Agricultural potential

• Creation of grazing corridors to reduce agro-pastoral conflicts

Finance, Economic

Planning and ICT

Education

Aspiration 5. Africa with a

strong cultural identity,

common heritage, values and

ethics

• Increase youth and women participation in integrated agricultural value chains by

coming up with relevant loan products.


Youth affairs and

sports

Aspiration 6. An Africa whose

development is people driven,

relying on the potential of the

African People, particularly it’s

Women and Youth and caring

for children.

• Training of the youth and establishment of youth empowerment initiative in

Lamu County

• Facilitating the empowerment of women to play their rightful role in all spheres

of life

• Conducting, facilitating and coordinating gender development programmes that

aim to achieve gender equity and eliminate gender disparity in all spheres of life

• Construction of at least one children rescue/protection centre in Lamu County

• Training of men and women on Gender-Based Violence (BGV) and supporting

the elimination of all forms of gender-based violence and discrimination against

women and girls and all other harmful social practices such as child marriage and

denying a girl child or a boy child the right to education. fully

• Establish a County Talent Academy

• Establishment of the Lamu Youth Brigade

Department of Youth

Affairs

Department of Gender

and Social Services

Department of Sports


14


Aspiration County Strategy To Achieve The Aspiration Responsible

Department

• Rehabilitate/construct youth resource centers in every sub-county

• Establish sports academies

• Rehabilitate sports playgrounds in every sub-county

• Participate in local, regional, and national sports championships

• Train referees and coaches

• Provision of sporting equipment in all wards

• Rehabilitate sports playgrounds in every sub-county

• Participate in local, regional, and national sports championships

• Train referees and coaches

• Provision of sporting equipment in all wards

Aspiration 7. Africa as a strong,

united, resilient and influential

global partner and play

Partnership development and external affairs directorate to be created to link the

county with other counties and development partners

Governors Office


58

2.11 Jumuiya ya Kaunti za Pwani (JKP)


Jumuiya ya Kaunti za Pwani, formed in 2015, is an economic bloc that brings together the six

Coast counties in Kenya (Mombasa, Kwale, Taita-Taveta, Kilifi, Lamu and Tana River). JKP

is a ‘home-grown” solution aimed at tackling the socio-economic challenges facing the

Coastal region. It is anchored on Article 189 (2) of the constitution that allows cooperation

among counties as well as the national government to improve performance and delivery.

JKPs vision and directive is to rationalise status at county level and action forward on legal

framework to anchor JKP; enhancing and promoting agricultural production for economic

empowerment and food and nutrition security; enhancing/ investing in livestock production

for economic empowerment and food and nutrition security; and strengthening health

systems, governance and leadership to enhance health, nutrition and livelihoods. The Lamu

IDP looks into addressing these socio-economic objectives in its planning. Cross- County

Interventions include:


• Joint approach into investing and utilisation of specialised services;

• Joint approach into establishment of Community Based Health Insurance
Mechanisms;

• Joint approach into establishment disease surveillance and outbreak/ emergency
preparedness and response mechanisms;

• Disease surveillance systems;

• Outbreak management schemes;

• Joint approach into subcontracting of certain services through Public-Private-
Partnership (PPP) initiatives; and

• Establish Jumuiya Health Summit.


2.11 Frontier Counties Development Council


The Forntier Counties development Council (FCDC) comprises Garissa, Lamu, West Pokot,

Turkana, Mandera, Marsabit, Tana River and Wajir counties. The main focus areas

• Promotion of peace, security and preventing violent extremism, values and good
governance;

• Pursuit of high, sustainable and equitable economic growth;

• Poverty reduction through employment generation and reduction of social
vulnerability;

• Protection of the environment and promotion of climate-friendly technologies and
sound agricultural practices;

• Promoting health care services; and

• Transforming technical, vocational and education to produce the right kind of skills
and expanding access to technology, applications, innovation and networks.


2.12 Lamu Port Investment Framework


The LAPSSET is a major flagship project under vision 2030 with several components including:

the Port, LAPSSET Corridor, Port City, Railway terminal station and the Resort city. Fisherman

wharfs, Cultural and ICT centre, Amusement park, SEZ, Airport, Oil refinery and Oil tankers also
form part of the proposals. The preparation of the plan was necessitated by the fact that the

components are linked together and hence the need to prepare a unified framework in order to

optimize land use and development. Some of the specific details regarding the LAPSSET project

are as follows:


59


• The Lamu port will be located in Manda Bay on 88,500 hectares of land (10,000 ha
land mass) with a capacity of 32 berths capable of handling 28 million tonnes of

cargo annually.

• The LAPSSET corridor is 200m wide with the proposed highway taking up 100m, the
railway expected to take a reserve of 60m, the pipeline 30m while 10m will be

reserved for utilities like water and sewer lines, power and fibre optic cables, and

the like.

• The Oil refinery and tankers are proposed at the Bargon area expected to take up
about 100 ha each. It is envisioned that the refinery will have the capability of

handling about 98,000 barrels of oil daily.

• The Resort City will be located in the towns of Manda, Ndeu, Mkunumbi and
Kiongwe occupying an area of 90ha, 470ha, 100ha and 80ha respectively.

• Mkunumbi is envisioned as cultural and ICT hub, Manda an amusement centre, Ndeu
will be a convention centre while Kiongwe will be a fisherman’s wharf (for Sea

sport fishing).

• The International Airport proposed at Mkunumbi is expected to cover approximately
2,409 hectares of land with a runway length of 2.5 km. the expected passenger

traffic is approximately 1 million per annum.

• The Vision for the Port City (Lamu Metropolis) was developed with the input of
stakeholders’ at stakeholders’ workshop.

• The City will be spread through the centres of Mokowe and Hindi with a combined
size of 647Km2. It is projected that the Metropolis will host about 500,000 people

in the year 2030, 1.25 Million in the year 2050, taking a base population of the

current 11,825 people.

• All the components will be linked by a 100m wide highway with the resort towns
being linked by a monorail as detailed later in the report.


2.13 LAPSSET Programme and its Impact on Future of Lamu County


LAPPSSET Development Corridor (See Map 1.1) is a strategic national economic program under

the vision 2030 with the objectives to:

• Enhance Kenya’s position as a gateway & transport hub to the East African Sub-
region and the Great Lakes Region;

• Establish a reliable access to the sea for Northern/Eastern parts of Kenya, South
Sudan and Ethiopia; and

• Facilitate trade, regional economic integration and interconnectivity between African
countries – i.e. Ethiopia - South Sudan- Rwanda, DRC, up to Douala in Cameroon

• Develop Kenya’s 2nd Transport & Economic Corridor

• Reduce over-reliance on the only Corridor - (Northern Corridor)

• Improve livelihoods of over 15 million people in North Eastern, Eastern, Rift Valley
and Coast.

• Facilitate trade and investment with South Sudan (over 4 million people) and Ethiopia
(over 80 million people).

Promote regional socio-_ economic development along the transport corridor especially in the
Northern, Eastern, North-Eastern and Coastal parts of Kenya.


60


CHAPTER 3: REVIEW OF CIDP I IMPLEMENTATION


An Integrated Development Plan (CIDP) is a framework on which organizational priorities

and targets are built. The process of developing an integrated plan begins with the

identification of development needs by stakeholders from which priorities and strategies of

addressing such needs are set. A cluster of related interventions form programmes, which are

disintegrated further to specific, action-oriented implementable units, referred to as projects.

The impact of a plan can be evaluated through carrying out an End Term Review (ETR)

which identifies achievements, challenges and lessons learnt throughout the execution

window. More importantly, the review draws recommendations on how to alleviate similar

and/or related challenges in the future.


The objectives of this review are to:

• Assess the extent of implementing the CIDP against expected results

• Examine the efficiency of allocated resources and their consequent contribution to
achievement of the county’s development priorities;

• Identify implementation challenges and recommend corrective actions;

• Identify emerging issues in the County Government scene occasioned by the evolving
devolved system of governance

• Provide recommendations for the preparation of the 2017/-2022 CIDP.
The assessment was based on the following evaluation tenets.


Figure 6: End Term Review Principles

The primary concern that arose during the review was the structure of the implementation

framework. According to the County Governments Act of 2012, sectoral plans, from which

the CIDP is developed should be programme based. The intended targets should be succinct

with sufficiently defined outcome indicators. Given that the first generation CIDP was

lacking in this requirement, determining the outcome and impact of service delivery proved a

challenge. In addition, a number of projects were not captured in the CIDP despite it being a

legal requirement. Nonetheless, the plan went a long way in designing projects that suit


61


community needs, as well as establishing ground infrastructure upon which future

development would take off.


It was also found out that shortfalls in human resource capacity affected the delivery of the

plan within the set September 1st deadline. Given the lean human capacity, the County

Government of Lamu was compelled to employ consultancy services to draw the plan. This

was largely so because the release of county funds by the Controller of Budget hinged on the

existence of a CIDP approved by the County Assembly as per Section 126 (3) of the Public

Finance Management Act, 2012. Although the county managed to have the document on

time, members of staff, the executive, county assembly and the people of Meru lacked touch

and ownership of the plan. The second implication was the development of an extremely

ambitious CIDP.


3.2 Status of Implementation of the Previous CIDP


3.2.1 County Revenue Streams


3.2.1.1 Equitable Share

Through the CARA Act as passed annually by the Parliament, Lmu County is allocated the

least amount of money compared to all the other 47 counties. This has been the case even

after the revision of the formular by the Commission for Revenue Allocation. Below is a

breakdown of the annual financial allocation to the county.


Table 31: Equitable Share Allocation by the CARA

FY 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18

Equitable

Share
138,852,590 1,438,769,749 1,790,321,875 2,051,883,746 2,214,008,743 2,476,400,000

Increment - 1,299,917,159 351,552,126 261,561,871 162,124,997 262,391,257

% Increase 0 936% 24% 15% 8% 12%


3.2.1.2 Own Source Revenue

The revenue collected by the Lsmu County government over the past 5 years has been

generally on the increase. The peak revenue collection was in 2016/17 in which 69 million

shillings was collected. The five year breakdown is depicted in the Table 33.


Table 32: Own Source Revenue

Local

Revenue
2012/2013 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18

Budgeted 0 86,124,909 86,124,909 107,000,000 84,000,000 90,000,000

Actual 12,834,971 23,749,560 56,185,990 53,143,417 68,984,579 12,498,350

Deviation 12,834,971 (62,375,349) (29,938,919) (53,856,583) (15,015,421) (77,501,650)

% Deviation 0 -72% -35% -50% -18% -86%

% Increase 0 85% 137% -5% 30% -82%


58

3.3 County Expenditure Analysis

Over the 5 year period that devolution has been in place, Lamu county Government has had a cumulative total budget of Ksh. 12,850,393,056.

The budget was expensed through 11 departments as indicated in the following table.


Table 33: County Expenditure Analysis

Expenditure Analysis
2013/2014 2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018

Recurrent
Developmen

t
Recurrent Development Recurrent Development Recurrent Development Recurrent Development

County Executive 236,534,850 81,500,000 306,692,348 202,964,240 311,552,304 98,000,000 399,597,825 94,818,108 329,800,941 241,299,274

County Assembly 185,742,780 33,300,000 225,000,000 169,610,000 379,784,663 40,000,000 333,200,000 82,000,000 324,600,000 145,000,000

Public Service Board - 0 40,047,285 0 46,661,773 0 45,649,522


47,800,000

Finance & Economic Planning 101,702,235 40,497,000 99,130,273 9,670,596 55,933,987 34,000,000 179,861,377 25,000,000 140,337,114 7,100,000

Trade and Industry Tourism

Development and Culture

10,372,436 19,150,000 12,399,088 48,750,000 18,198,893 36,500,000 36,389,978 40,003,581 24,379,189 24,100,000

Health Service, public sanitation

and environment

323,367,412 102,600,000 381,706,875 185,548,720 519,918,992 174,200,000 607,555,165 422,913,408 774,741,200 174,539,864

Youth, Gender & Sports

Children Education

72,428,148 36,500,000 87,165,685 114,150,000 44,412,300 159,200,000 144,288,912 113,706,408 134,755,881 83,780,441

Land Planning Transport &

Infrastructure & Housing Water

& Natural Resources Energy

71,215,120 111,800,000 54,716,337 269,578,984 47,575,654 225,965,747 63,928,600 288,100,095 66,841,164 206,169,673

Agriculture and irrigation 58,706,792 27,132,800 54,990,254 47,343,100 57,428,774 50,400,000 68,248,541 44,731,411 65,626,735 58,556,015

Livestock , Fisheries and

cooperative

75,867,231 40,900,000 66,325,450 71,940,688 67,504,462 57,800,000 78,830,694 81,380,965 66,491,878 60,200,238

Information, Communication &

Public Participation

12,192,624 7,000,000 47,121,188 14,867,174 30,313,540 6,500,000 33,985,937 27,065,758 29,242,196 13,696,166

Total 1,148,129,628 500,379,800 1,375,294,783 1,134,423,502 1,579,285,343 882,565,747 1,991,536,551 1,219,719,734 2,004,616,297 1,014,441,671

% Expenditure Analysis 70% 30% 55% 45% 64% 36% 62% 38% 66% 34%

Total 1,648,509,428 2,509,718,285 2,461,851,090 3,211,256,285 3,019,057,968

GRAND TOTAL 12,850,393,056


59


3.3 Summary of Key Achievements

The County has implemented various programmes/projects as per the 8 MTEF sectors. These

sectors comprise of:

1. Public Administration & International (or inter-government) Relations;
2. General Economic and Commercial Affairs;
3. Energy, Infrastructure and ICT;
4. Education;
5. Health;
6. Environmental Protection, Water and Natural Resources;
7. Social Protection, Culture and Recreation; and
8. Agriculture, Rural and Urban Development (ARUD)


The sectors mentioned above are further divided into Departmental units. These units have

focused on implementation of their respective devolved functions. As devolution was still novel

in the period 2013-2017, it has been a transitory period from the previous municipality to the

County Government system. The County faced major hurdles in developing capacity to deliver

services and track implementation during this change. Therefore, the 2018-2022 CIDP is aimed

at aligning the stakeholders’ needs to the available resources in the most efficient way.


Stakeholders are key in the implementation process as they play a pivotal role in the success of

any project. This chapter will outline the stakeholders by sector to ensure their functions are well

adopted. The stakeholders assist in prioritizing the county programmes and projects. which in

turn builds on sustainability, ownership and funding. The county has had an achievement rating

of 44 percent as far as implementation of the program and projects of the first generation CIDP is

concerned. The following table contains the implementation average for each delivery unit under

the county government.


Table 34: Achievement Rating Per County Department

No. Departmental Delivery Unit (Sub-Sector’s Name) Average

Implementation

Score

1. Agriculture and Irrigation 77.27%

2. Public Service and Administration 57.47%

3. Education, Gender, Youth Affairs And Sports 31.55%

4. Finance, Strategy and Economic Planning 18.75%

5. Fisheries, Livestock and Cooperative Development 54.68%

6. Health, Sanitation and Environment 41.67%

7. ICT, E-Government and Public Participation 24.00%

8. Lands, Physical Planning, Infrastructure and Urban Development 31.08%

9. Count Public Service Board 66.67%

10. Trade, Tourism And Culture 39.29%

Average Projects Completion Score 44.24%


60


The department of Agriculture had the highest (77.27%) level of projects implementation while

the department of finance had the least (18.75%). A comprehensive list of major 2013/2017

CIDP projects implemented by each department is given as follows.


Table 35: Key Achievements by County Department

Sector Department Key Achievements

Public

Administration


County Public

Service Board

• 437 recruited employees (224 male and 213 female)

• Job evaluation and Staff rationalization done in
collaboration with the Salaries Remunerations

Commission

Public

Administration
• Establishment of an enforcement command center

• Ward headquarters established in the 10 wards

• Garage and fuel depot constructed

• 7 policy documents published

• County Headquarters constructed

• Ten (10) motor cycles purchased for ward administration

• County Drought & Disaster Contingency fund
established

County Assembly • Construct modern Assembly chambers and offices.

• Refurbishment of Speaker’s residence.

Agriculture and

Irrigation

Agriculture • Promotion of Mechanized Agriculture – 15 tractors, 3
trailers and 15 ploughs acquired

• Provision of agricultural extension service - 40,000
farmers were covered

• Provision of certified seeds - 150 tons maize and 10 tons
rice issued to farmers

• Provision of subsidized fertilizer – 500,000kgs issued

• Promotion of crop diversification - 250,000 cuttings of
cassava and sweet potatoes, pineapple, water melon,

passion fruit, bananas were issued

• Promotion of Coconut production – 50,000 seedlings
distributed

• Promotion of Cotton production – 360 tons of cotton seed
issued to farmers

• Purchase of extension services Motor vehicle and 10
motorbikes

Irrigation • 10 Irrigation projects implemented

• Excavation of 4 water pans with a capacity of 10,000M3

Fisheries • Setting up of 3 cold storage facilities

• Provision of modern fishing equipment worth 11million

• Purchase of fishing crafts and engines worth 57million

• Rehabilitation of landing sites in Shella and Kiunga


61


Sector Department Key Achievements

wards

• Construction of two modern fishing markets in Faza and
Kiunga

• Establishment of fingerlings hatchery in Mpeketoni

• Construction and rehabilitation of Fisheries boatyard

• Operationalization of 2 surveillance boats

• Capacity built BMUs, fisher cooperatives and fish
farmers clusters

Livestock

&Veterinary

Services

• Improvement of livestock infrastructure (dips, markets
and ranches) at 111million

• Construction and rehabilitation of Veterinary/Livestock
offices

• Construction and rehabilitation of slaughter houses in
Lamu and Kiunga

• Livestock health improvement programme

• Livestock breed improvement programme in Pate, Faza,
Mpeketoni, Hindi, Amu and Witu

• Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign
programme

• Vector Control Campaign

• Livestock produce Marketing targeting livestock markets,
auction ring and livestock products

• Construction of honey processing center at Hindi

• Fodder production in Witu and Vumbe

Lands & Physical

Planning
• County spatial plan

• Regularization of Swahili Villages and settle schemes

• Planning of Mokowe (Lamu Metropolis Structure Plan)

• Preparation of a valuation roll

• Survey of trading centres within settlement schemes

Education Education • 63 ECDE classes constructed

• Provision of teaching/learning materials worth 12million

• Training of 160 School Examiners by KNEC

• Equipping of Vocational Training Institutes (Witu,
Mpeketoni, Amu and Kizingitini polytechnic)

• Issuance of scholarships and bursaries worth over
200million

• Provision of Sanitary Towels in Schools (all KCPE
candidates)

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation


Gender
• Establishing of 6 GBV Working Groups

• Investment Clinics for special groups – 100 women
trained cost of 8 million

• AGPO training for special group – 313 trained


62


Sector Department Key Achievements

• Establishment of low cost Centres for PWDs for 2.5
million

Youth • Skills upgrading (Driving training) for Witu, Mkunumbi
and Mkomani

• Construction of rehabilitation center partnering with red
cross (5 million) Capacity Building of 300 Community

Based Groups

Sports • Development and Rehabilitation of Sports stadia at
12.7million

• Purchase of sports equipment in all 10 wards

• Construction of integrated recreational social halls at
17.4million

• Talent search through conduction of annual tournaments

General

Economic, and

Commercial

Affairs

Finance Strategy

and Economic

Planning

• Engaging public in formulation of plans, strategy papers
and budgets as per CGA 2012.

• Revenue automation

Trade • 6 Markets developed

• 3 Juakali sheds constructed and equipped

• Tourism policy and strategic plan developed

• Establishment of public libraries in Lamu west

• One Investors conference organized

• 4million Trade Development loans issued through Lamu
Joint Loan Board

Tourism • Lamu destination branding (Festivals and promotions)

• Signage of sites and monuments

• Construction of tourism information center


Cooperative

Development

• Revival and strengthening of Co-operative society in
Witu, Kibokoni, Amu and Kizingitini for Ksh.7,100,000

• Formation and operationalization of 6 boda boda, 6 boat
operators, 6 youths, 6 mangrove and 6 Women Sacco’s

• Revitalization of Fishermen Cooperative in Faza

• Establishment of Bee Keepers cooperative

Health Health • Increase the number of medical personnel by 30% as at
2018

• Equipping of all health facilities in the County with
236million worth of equipment

• Provision of 157million worth of Pharmaceuticals and
Non-pharmaceuticals to all public facilities

• Training of 13 medical personnel

• Elevate Lamu hospital to Level 5 Referral status


63


Sector Department Key Achievements

• Construction of maternity unit at Faza District Hospital

• Renovation and fencing of 16 Health facilities

• Improvement of laboratory and imaging services in
Lamu, Faza, Mpeketoni, Kizingitini and Witu.

• Upgrading Witu health center to Sub-county Hospital

• Renovation and Expansion of Faza Hospital

• Purchased 3 road ambulance and 3 boat ambulance

• Automation of services in Lamu and Mpeketoni
Hospitals

• Renovation and upgrading of Mokowe Health Centre

• Construction of 10 new primary healthcare facilities

• Upgrading Mpeketoni hospital

Public Health • Designation and improvement of waste disposal sites in
Mkomani and Shella

• Repair of drainage system in Amu town

Energy,

Infrastructure

and ICT

ICT, E-

Government

&Public

Participation

• Setting of a redundant internet access in all county
offices

• Setting up of unified communication solutions for the
county – staff email and printed literature

• Setting of county data storage & recovery centres

• Set-up of ICT resource centers across the county

• Set-up of Wi-Fi hotspots

• Provision of data and system security

Infrastructure • Repair of 2 Footbridges in Siyu and Myambogi

• Repair of 2 jetties in Manda and Shella

• Repair of 2 breakwaters

• Construction of 1.5km length of seawall

• Construction of a bus stage shades in Pate, Siyu,
Tchundwa, Mbajumwali and Nyambogi

• Construction bus stage shades at Muhamarani and
Mkunumbi

• Construction of bodaboda shade in Witu ward

• Construction of paved walkways in Faza, Ndau,
Mkomani, Bahari, Shella and Kizingitini

• Road grading in the county at a cost of 93million

• Opening of new roads in Ngoi, Uziwa and Manda

• Solar-powered lighting project at a cost of 108million

Environmental

protection,

Water and

Natural

Resources

Water • Feasibility study in Lake Moa

• Connection of water from Mokowe to Baragoni

• Establishment of the Vumbe, Manda water project

• Pipeline extension from Faza to Tchundwa,
Mbwajumwali and Myabogi villages


64


Sector Department Key Achievements

• Desalination plants in Kiunga and Siyu

• Acquisition of 2 water bowsers

Natural

Resources
• Tree planting in water catchment areas


3.4 Challenges Experienced

The implementation of the CIDP was constrained by a myriad of challenges. These ranged from

financial in nature to institution capacity. The following are the most cited challenges across the

departments.

• Lack of local ownership for most of the CIDP projects undertaken by the county. This is
likely stemming from the lack of stakeholder/citizen participation in the projects life

cycle.

• The county has no effective framework for the mornitoring and evaluation of Projects

• Resource constrains in terms of Insufficient Budgetary allocation and delays in
remittances from the National Government

• Change in priorities by implementers and consumers that occurs between the time of
project identification and project implementation

• Insecurity situation in some parts of the county e.g. Basuba, Ishakani, Witu has affected
implementation of various CIDP programs in those areas.

• Absence of necessary policy framework and regulation to anchor projects envisaged
outlined in the CIDP

• Limited instituional capacity and technical knowhow both within the County public
service and contractors/service providers implementing the Projects

• Lack of appropriate regulatory approval prior to project implementation which affects the
legal standings of the projects. This also has the adverse effects of locking out potential

funding for such projects.


65


CHAPTER 4: COUNTY DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES AND STRATEGIES


4.1 Introduction

The chapter focuses on the county development strategies giving the current overview in

relations to developmental thematic areas as well as the proposed policy strategy to address the

thematic areas. The natural resources have been documented under their respective sectors to

capture the county natural endowment, giving an overview of the dependent sectors and the

status of resource utilization and opportunity for optimal resource utilization.

The chapter also, highlights development priorities by sector giving sector vision, mission, sector

values and objectives. Sector development needs and areas of prioritization and strategies have

also been highlighted. It details the future programmes and projects to be implemented in the

second generation CIDP 2018-2022.

Lastly, the chapter makes an overview of the key flagship/transformative projects whose

implementation will have high impact in terms of creation of employment, increment of county

competitiveness, revenue generation and cross-county engagements and will go in realizing the

dream of ‘Making lamu a prosperous county offering a high quality of life for its people”.


4.2 Development Priorities and Strategies

This section gives a summary of the development priorities identified in the sectors from the

spatial plan, sectoral plans and during stakeholder’s consultative forums. The development

priorities, programmes and projects are clearly linked to the Kenya Vision 2030, MTP, County

Transformative Agenda, as well as strategies identified in the spatial development framework.

Emphasis is given to programmes and Projects aimed at fulfilling Article 56 of COK, achieving

the aspirations of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and African Union Agenda 2063

among others.

4.2.1 Agriculture, Rural and Urban Development

Introduction


The Agriculture Rural and Urban Development Sector is one of the 9 sectors being included in

the CIDP for the period 2018/2022. The sector is composed of crops, livestock production,

fisheries, lands and physical planning subsectors that target to achieve food security and

improved nutrition. The sector therefore intends to focus on three broad areas, namely;

enhancing large-scale production; boosting smallholder productivity; and reducing the cost of

food among others.


Vision

A food secure, wealthy and prosperous county with efficient, sustainable and manageable land

use.


Mission


66


To promote and facilitate the development and management of land resources; crop, livestock

and fisheries husbandry; crop and livestock pest and disease control; and agro-based industries


Goal

To achieve proper landuse, food security, wealth and employment creation, and poverty

reduction in Lamu County.


Sector/subsector needs, priorities and strategies

• Improving market access and trade of produce from livestock fisheries and crops

• Improving range resource management and conservation

• Improving productivity and output in the agricultural sector

• Strengthening institutional capacity

• Creating enabling environment for agricultural development

• Efficient and sustainable land use

• Developing and managing blue economy

• Mainstreaming climate change and other cross cutting issues in agriculture and rural

development.

4.2.1.1 Agriculture Sub-sector

The crop agriculture sub sector during the next phase of CIDP intends to implement four

programmes: administrative planning and support services; extension advisory services; crop

production and productivity improvement; and value addition and marketing. The development

priorities and strategies will be on human resource development and management; administration

support services; provision of farmer advisory services; improvement of the agricultural training

centre; farm mechanization; on-farm irrigation; farm inputs access; pest and disease control;

climate change adaptation in agriculture; agriculture sector development support; processing of

crop produce; and agricultural marketing and information dissemination. The prioritized areas

during the next five years will be funded by the county government, national government and

other stakeholders to achieve food security, employment creation and poverty alleviation in the

county.


4.2.1.2 Fisheries Sub-sector

The fishery sub-sector contributes over 70% incomes to households in Lamu especially in Lamu

East sub-county. The sub-sector is therefore a major economic driver generating incomes, wealth

and employment to the residents of Lamu. It is estimated to have an annual turnover of over 1.5

billion to the county’s economy as direct in flows or from other fisheries related activities

including local trading in fish and fisheries products, manufacturing, processing and export. The

sub-sector’s transformative agenda for 5 years period will entail allocation of resources to

projects identified across the 10 wards, under fisheries development service as the main

programme. The key areas of delivery at sub-programme level are:-

1. Fisheries production and productivity


67


2. Fisheries infrastructural development,

3. Product development and marketing

4. Fisheries extension and training


Efficient use of resources allocated towards achieving the objectives of the department will help

transform form the sub-sector from artisanal/subsistence based fishing economy to semi

industrial fisheries with the county reaping maximum benefits from its marine and other fisheries

resources. The mandate of the department is management, development and conservation of all

fisheries resources.


4.2.1.3 Livestock Sub-sector

The Livestock production sub sector will implement one programme with four sub-programmes.

The programme is livestock production and productivity and the sub-programme are livestock

extension, livestock production improvement, livestock marketing, trade and value addition and

range resource management and development to address three value chains mainly indigenous

chicken, beef and dairy value chains. The programmes are geared toward achieving fod security,

income generation and employment. The livestock production prioritized areas will be funded by

the county government, national government and other stakeholders to achieve food security,

employment creation and poverty alleviation in the county.


4.2.1.4 Veterinary Sub-sector

Veterinary department is a sub-sector in the livestock larger Agriculture, rural and urban

development (ARUD) sector. The livestock subsector contributes 40% in the income of the

people of Lamu County. 30% of the human populations in Lamu are directly or indirectly

employed in the sub sector. The livestock population is distributed in the two sub-counties i.e.

Lamu East and Lamu West sub counties with the larger population being in Lamu West.

Livestock species include Cattle, Sheep, Goats, donkeys and poultry. Other emerging livestock

include bees and ostrich which are wild but are currently being domesticated. The sub-sector’s

transformative agenda for 5 years period will entail allocation of resources to projects identified

across the 10 wards, under five Veterinary development services as the main programme. The

key areas of delivery at sub-programme level are :-

1. Livestock health improvement

2. Veterinary public health

3. Artificial Insemination

4. Promotional of Livestock Export Zone

5. Animal welfare and hides,skins and leather development


68

Table 36: Sector Programmes: Agriculture Sub Sector

Programme Name: Administrative Planning and Support Services

Objective: To equip the department with adequate equipment and competent staff

Outcome: Efficient delivering of advisory services to farmers

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance indicators Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

(KShs)

Human Resource

Development and

Management

Efficiency and

staff productivity

improved

3 • % of skilled/ competent

staff able to deliver

services to farmers

• % Reduction of Public

Complaints

• Improved staff: farmer

ratio

• % of staff satisfied with

working environment

8 8 8 8 8 277,000,000

Administration

Support Services

Improved service

delivery in a

conducive

environment

5 offices

at Wards

level

• % increase in office space

at Wards level

• % increase of equipped

office with assorted

items

10 10 10 10 10 25,000,000

Wider area

coverage by staff

15 bikes

2

Vehicle

• % increase in staff

mobility

• % increase in staff area

coverage

2/15 2/20 2/25 2/25 2/25 7,500,000


69


Programme Name: Extension Advisory Services

Objective: Increase adoption of farming technologies

Outcome: Increased crop production and income at farm level

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

(KShs)

Provision of

Extension services

Improved crop

production and

income at farm

level

40,000 • % Increase in adoption of

new farming technologies

• % in increase in crop

yield for the major crops

• % increase in income

returns at farm level

• % increase in youth,

women and men

participation in

agricultural development

10,000 10,200 10,400 10,600 10,800 100,000,000

Improvement of the

agricultural training

centre

Improved crop

production and

income at farm

level

7,000,000 • % increase in adoption

level of new farming

technologies

• % increased in bed

occupancy at the ATC

• % increase in revenue

generation for the county

7,100,000 7,200,000 7,300,000 7,400,000 7,500,000 68,000,000


70


Programme Name: Crop production and Productivity

Objective: To improve access to agricultural support services and revenue generation for the county

Outcome: Increased production and incomes at farm level

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

(KShs)

Farm mechanization Timely

delivery of

tractor services

in the county

Tractors- 15,

trailers-5,

harrows-2,

disc ploughs-

15

• % increase in number

of acres put under crop

production

• % increase in number

of farmers accessing

mechanized

agricultural services

Tractors-

15,

trailers-5,

harrows-

2, disc
ploughs-

15

ploughs,

3 new

trailers

Tractors-

25, trailers-

8, harrows-,

disc

ploughs-25,
Planter-3,

Sheller-3

Tractors- 25,

trailers-8,

harrows-,

disc ploughs-

25,
Planter-3,

Sheller-3

Tractors- 25,

trailers-8,

harrows-,

disc ploughs-

25,
Planter-3,

Sheller-3

Tractors- 25,

trailers-8,

harrows-,

disc ploughs-

25,
Planter-3,

Sheller-3

100,000,0

00

Improved

generation for

the county

Ksh

11,954.085

• % increase in the

amount of revenue

generated by the

tractors and other

equipments

20,000,00

0

20,000,000 20,000,000 20,000,000 20,000,000 -

On-farm irrigation Increased

production of

prime crops

75 acres


200

• % Increase in land

acreage under

irrigation

• % Increase in number

of farmers practicing

irrigated farming

20 acres


40

20 acres


40


20 acres


40


20 acres


40


20 acres


40


50,000,00

0

Farm inputs access Increased crop

yield

- • % increase in number

of farms receiving

results on soil fertility

level

50
samples

- - - - 1,500,000


71


Programme Name: Crop production and Productivity

Objective: To improve access to agricultural support services and revenue generation for the county

Outcome: Increased production and incomes at farm level

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

(KShs)

Increased crop

yield

124 tons • % increase in quantity

and types of certified

inputs accessed by

farmers (maize seeds,

NERICA seeds, cow

peas and green grams)

58 tons 60 ton 61 tons 62 63 80,

000,000

Improved crop

production

5,600 bags • % Increase in quantity

and type of subsidized

fertilizer accessed by

farmers

• % Increase in farmers

accessing subsidized

fertilizer

6,000

bags

7,000

bags

8,000 9,000 10,000 80,000,00

0

Improved

production of

quality seed

cotton

362 ton • % Increase in land

acreage under cotton

production

• % Increase in

production of AR

grade of seed cotton

80 tons 80 tons 80 tons 80 tons 80 tons 40,

000,000

Improved

production of

quality coconut

products

50,000 • % Increase in acreage

under young coconut

crop



20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 50,000,00

0

Pest and disease

control

Improved crop

yield and

households

5 • % Reduction of post-

harvest losses

1 1 1 1 1 25,000,00

0


72


Programme Name: Crop production and Productivity

Objective: To improve access to agricultural support services and revenue generation for the county

Outcome: Increased production and incomes at farm level

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

(KShs)

income • % Increase in

achieving quality farm

produce



Improved crop

yield and

households

income

11 • % Reduction in

infestation of crops

• % Improvement in

control of notifiable

pests

16

240

litres

12

ULV

sprayer

s


16

240

litres

12 ULV

sprayers

16

240 litres

12 ULV

sprayers

16

240 litres

12 ULV

sprayers

16

240 litres

12 ULV

sprayers

5,000,000

Climate change

adaptation in

agriculture

Improved

resilience and

adaptability to

climate change

30% • % Reduction of food

in security

• % Increase of farmers

accessing potable

water

• % Increase in crop

yields at farm level

• % Acreage reduction

of soil degradation at

farm level

30 30% 35% 35% 40% 600

million

Agriculture sector

development support

Programme

Improved

cashew nut

production and

income

30kg/tree


• % increment of

kilograms produced

per tree


35kg/tr

ee


5 kg

38kg/tre

e


5 kg

40kg/tree


5 kg raw:

43kg/tree


45kg/tree


82,000,00

0


73


Programme Name: Crop production and Productivity

Objective: To improve access to agricultural support services and revenue generation for the county

Outcome: Increased production and incomes at farm level

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

(KShs)


6 kg raw: 1

kg processed

nuts


8,000 tons


3,000


• % increase in quality

of nuts


• % Increase in quantity

of product sold

• Increase in number of

farmers deriving their

livelihood from

cashew nut

raw: 1

kg

process

ed nuts


8,200

tons

3,200


raw: 1

kg

processe

d nuts


8,400

tons

3,250

1 kg

processe

d nuts


8,600

tons

3,300

5 kg raw:

1 kg

processe

d nuts


8,800

tons

3,400

5 kg raw:

1 kg

processe

d nuts

9,000

tons

3,450


Programme Name: Value addition and Market

Objective: To improve shelf-life of crop produce

Outcome: Increased returns from crop produce

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target
Year

1

Year 2 Year

3

Year

4

Year

5
Total Budget

(KShs)

Processing of crop

produce

Increased

income from

processed

- • % increase of fruits

processed

• % reduction of post-

1 - - - - 100M


74


Programme Name: Value addition and Market

Objective: To improve shelf-life of crop produce

Outcome: Increased returns from crop produce

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target
Year

1

Year 2 Year

3

Year

4

Year

5
Total Budget

(KShs)

fruits harvest losses

• % increase in income

generation for farmers

• % of farmer groups

contracted to supply

raw materials to

investors

Increased

shelf life of

farm produce

5 • % increase of farmers

adopting agro-

processing technologies

• % of number of

CIGs/VMGs supported

to establish cottage

industries (coconut,

cashew nut, simsim)

5


1

5


1

5


1

5


1

5


1

22.5M

Agricultural

marketing and

information

dissemination

Enhanced

marketing of

food in deficit

areas

-


-


4

• % increase of farmers

using marketing

platforms (SMS based,

Website based, Radio)

• % increase in adoption

of marketing

regulations (Prices,

1


1


1

1


1


1

1


1


1

1


1


1

1


1


1

5M


5M


75


Programme Name: Value addition and Market

Objective: To improve shelf-life of crop produce

Outcome: Increased returns from crop produce

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators

Planned Target
Year

1

Year 2 Year

3

Year

4

Year

5
Total Budget

(KShs)

handling, weight &

measures)

• % increase in using

farm produce collection
centres

10M


76


Fisheries Sub-Sector

Programme Name: General Administration, planning and support services

Objective: Improved service delivery

Outcome: Efficient and effective Fisheries, Livestock and cooperatives service delivery

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators
Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget
(KShs)

Human resource capacity

building and

development

Skilled and

knowledgeable

work force

offering high

quality services

No of staff with

skills and

knowledge

offering high

quality services

54 59 65 70 80 86 87.6M

Construction and

refurbishment of offices

Conducive

working

environment for

all categories of

staff

No of offices

constructed or

refurbished,

fully equipped

and operational

7 7 8 10 12 14 42M

Transport enhancement Timely and

Efficient service

delivery


% increase in

field outreach

activities and

client contact

time

50% 50% 65% 80% 85% 90% 72.2M

Project planning and

implementation

Timely planning

and

implementation

of projects

No of annual

development

plans developed

and

operationalized

1 2 3 4 5 5M

Effective M&E

systems

internalized in all

programmes and

projects

No of Quality

M&E

frameworks

developed and

operationalized

0 1 2 3 4 5


77


Programme Name: General Administration, planning and support services

Objective: Improved service delivery

Outcome: Efficient and effective Fisheries, Livestock and cooperatives service delivery

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators
Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget
(KShs)

information Communication

Technology
High quality ICT

office

equipments and

other accessories

% of offices

well equipped

with ICT tools

and other office

facilities.

40%


50 70 80 90 100


3.45M

Effective

communication

of departmental

activities and

milestones

No of

communication

materials

developed and

shared

0 1 3 5 7 10

TOTALS 210,250,000


78


Programme Name: Fisheries Development services

Objective: To provide for effective Fisheries management, conservation, development and utilization of fisheries resources in the County

Outcome: sustainable production and increased incomes and revenues to fisher folk and county government

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators
Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget
(KShs)

Fisheries production and

productivity

Increased

landing of highly

valued fish

Increase

tonnage of fish

harvested and

landed

annually

2,500 tones 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,7000 5,600 254,000,000

Increased use of

modern

technologies in

fishing

% increase in

uptake and use

of technology

in fishing

10% 15 18 25 30 35

Fisheries infrastructural

development

Improved fish

preservation,

handling

sanitation and

hygiene

% increase in

fish

preservation

and handling

facilities

40% 50 60 80 85 90 125,000,000

Product development and

marketing

Improved quality

of fish and fish

products

Tonnage of

value added

fish products

20 tones 25 40 55 60 70 48,000,000

Improved market

access for fish

and fish products

% of fish and

fish products

accessing

highly

competitive

fish markets

5% 10 20 25 30 35


79


Programme Name: Fisheries Development services

Objective: To provide for effective Fisheries management, conservation, development and utilization of fisheries resources in the County

Outcome: sustainable production and increased incomes and revenues to fisher folk and county government

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators
Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget
(KShs)

Fisheries extension and

training

Enhanced skills

and knowledge

of fisher folks

% of fishers

whose skills

and knowledge

have been

enhanced

5% 20 35 50 60 80 57,000,000

Improve uptake

and use of

technologies in

fisheries

% of fisher

folk using

improved

technologies in

fishing and

fisheries

related

activities


5% 10 20 25 30 40

Totals 484,000,000


80


Veterinary Services

Programme: Veterinary Services

Objective: Improve livestock productivity and facilitate access to market of livestock and livestock products

Outcome: Increased rural household income and county government revenue from trade in livestock and livestock products

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators
Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget
(KShs)

imesLivestock Health

Improvement

Decreased

incidences of

diseases,

vectors,

morbidity and

mortality in

livestock

Percentage

of healthy

livestock

55% 62% 67% 7 78% 80% 289,570,000

Veterinary Public

health

Quality and

safe livestock

and livestock

products

Percentage

quality of

safe

livestock &

livestock

products

produced


60% 65% 70% 75% 80% 85% 118,300,000

Artificial Insemination Breed

improvement

for milk and

meat

production

Percentage

increase in

milk and

meat

production

30% 45% 55% 60% 74% 85% 63,200,000

Development of a

livestock export zone

Improved

livestock

Percentage

progress of

0 0 10% 20% 30% 40% 20,000,000


81


Programme: Veterinary Services

Objective: Improve livestock productivity and facilitate access to market of livestock and livestock products

Outcome: Increased rural household income and county government revenue from trade in livestock and livestock products

Sub Programme1 Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators
Planned Target

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget
(KShs)

(LEZ) market access LEZ

Animal Welfare Increased

community

consciousness

on animal

welfare

Percentage

of residents

conscious

OR aware

of animal

welfare

35% 20% 25% 40% 60% 70% 2,920,000

Hides, skins and leather

development

Increased

income from

trade in hides

and skins

Tonnage of

quality

hides and

skins

produced

increased

5 8 10 12 14 15 12,600,000

Totals 506,590,000


82


Livestock Production And Productivity Improvement

Programme: Livestock Production And Productivity Improvement

Objective: To Improve Livestock Production And Productivity

Outcome:

SUB –

PROGRAMM

E

OUTCOME KEY PERFORMANCE

INDICATOR

Baseline PLANNED TARGET

YEAR

1

YEAR

2

YEAR

3

YEAR

4

YEAR

5

Total Budget

Livestock

Extension service

delivery

Improved adoption of

Modern Livestock

Production

technologies and

innovations

Increase in Proportion of Farmers

depending on Livestock Production as a

livelihood

40% 50 60 70 80 90 15,000,000

% increase in quantity of Livestock and

Livestock Products
30% 30 40 50 60 70 10,000,000

% increase in quality of Livestock and

Livestock products
30% 30 40 50 60 70 10,000,000

Livestock

Production

Improvement

Improved livestock

production and

productivity

Increase in number of livestock and

livestock products
395,328 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 800,000 193,300,000

Livestock

Marketing, Trade

And Value

Addition

Improved trade and

household income

from livestock

% increase in volume of livestock and

Livestock products traded in Lamu county

by June, 2022

30% 40 50 60 70 80 205,000,000

% Increase in household income from sale

of Livestock and Livestock Products
40% 40 50 60 70 80 200,000,000

Range Resource

Management and

Development

Improve Pastoralists

resilience and

minimize resource

use conflict

% Increase in rangeland carrying capacity

and livestock nutrition due to improved

range conditions

20% 30 40 50 60 70 525,000,000

Total 1,158,300,000


83


4.2.2 Lands, Physical Planning and Urban Development Sub-sector


Mandate: To formulate and implement County land policy, undertake physical planning,

undertake land surveys and mapping and provision of housing and office space for the

County.


Vision: A sustainable use of land for improved local livelihoods


Mission: To facilitate improvement of livelihood of county residents through efficient

administration, equitable access, secure tenure and sustainable management of land

resources.

Core function:

Preparation of urban and rural plans

1. Development control

2. Survey and mapping

3. Policy formulation and research.

4. Management of Government housing estates.

5. Facilitate access to affordable housing through training local communities on the use

of appropriate building technology and materials.

6. Provide essential infrastructural services to improve sustainable housing in unplanned

settlements

7. Acquisition of titles for Government properties and plots.


84

Table 37: Sub - Sector Programmes (Land, Physical Planning, Housing & Urban Development)

Programme Name: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION, PLANNING & SUPPORT SERVICES

Objective: To support & offer conducive environment for optimal planning & land administration.

Outcome: Improved service delivery & increased staff motivation

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

1.1Human

resource

development

Well trained

officers

responding to the

public needs &

issues

Coordination

No structure Clear
organizational
structure

Fully

established

& approved

Departmental

structure

- - - - 50M

Effective &

efficient delivery

services to the

public

0 No. of vacancies

filled

5 3 2 2 - 15M

Increased

knowledge &

skills

10% No. of staff

attended refresher

courses

20% 20% 20% 20% 10% 5M

1.2 Transport Effective &

efficient transport

for staff

0 No. of vehicles &

boat purchased

1 vehicle 1 boat - - - 12M

1.3

Communication

& ICT

Improved

communication &

relationship

between

employees and

departments

Existing GIS

Lab

Modernization of GIS

lab & connection to

server

20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 4M

Seamless

communication &

information

Internet

connectivity

Fast & Reliable

internet connectivity at

50% 50% - - - 3M


85


Programme Name: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION, PLANNING & SUPPORT SERVICES

Objective: To support & offer conducive environment for optimal planning & land administration.

Outcome: Improved service delivery & increased staff motivation

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

sharing Ardhi House

1.4 County

specific Policy

& regulations

County laws

responsive to

needs &

challenges of the

community

2 No. of County specific

policies & regulations

prepared

2 2 2 2 2 10M


2.0 Programme Name: PHYSICAL PLANNING

Objective: To plan sustainable, functional and vibrant towns, markets and villages.

Outcome: Improved living standards and service provision in our towns, markets and villages

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

2.1Spatial
Planning

Properly planned
Development

10% % of area well planned 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 100M

2.2 Settlements Proper

arrangement of the

villages & markets

30% % of market centres

and villages planned

10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 200M

2.3Developmen

t Control

Sustainable and

well coordinated

development

10% % of compliance to

development control

regulations

10% 20% 20% 20% 20% 50M


86


2.0 Programme Name: PHYSICAL PLANNING

Objective: To plan sustainable, functional and vibrant towns, markets and villages.

Outcome: Improved living standards and service provision in our towns, markets and villages

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

Increased revenue

collection and

healthy, clean

environment

10% Sensitization &

awareness creation on

the development

application process and

laws applicable

20% 20% 30% 10% 10% 50M

Increased revenue

generation

Compliance with

the built

environment laws

0 E-Development

application program

adopted

0 50% 50% 0 0 8M


Programme Name: HOUSING

Objective: To improve access to adequate and affordable housing for the Lamu residents

Outcome: Improved living standards and service provision in our towns, markets and villages

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

3.1 Informal

settlement

upgrading

Improved housing

in informal

settlements

10% % increase of

households with

improved housing

20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 100M

Empowerment of

the urban

10% % of population 15% 20% 30% 40% 50% 200M


87


Programme Name: HOUSING

Objective: To improve access to adequate and affordable housing for the Lamu residents

Outcome: Improved living standards and service provision in our towns, markets and villages

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

population employed

3.2 County

Government

Housing

Improved

livelihoods

100

county

houses

Number of staff

accomodated in decent

housing

20 new units 20 new

units

20 new

units

20 new

units

20 new

units

625M

Efficient and

effective service

delivery

1 existing

governor's

office

County office space

available for

occupation

1 annex for

technical

staff


2 sub-

county

annex for

technical

staff

_ _ _ 150M


Secured public

assets devoid of

encroachment

20% Documentation of

County Government

housing and assets

30% 30% 20% - - 100M


Programme Name: URBAN DEVELOPMENT

Objective: To effectively administer and manage urban areas

Outcome: Designated urban areas

Well planned and serviced urban areas

4.1 Urban

Management &

Strengthened

urban institutions

0 1 Municipal Board and

5 Town Committees

1 2 2 - - 100M


88


Programme Name: URBAN DEVELOPMENT

Objective: To effectively administer and manage urban areas

Outcome: Designated urban areas

Well planned and serviced urban areas

Governance with improved

infrastructure and

services

formed

Knowledge

sharing

empowerment and

active

participation on

urban governance

issues

0% Executive, Assembly,

local community &

other key stakeholders

sensitized on formation

of the board & town

committees

50% 50% - - - 20M

4.2 Planning &

Development

Sustainable,

inclusive, healthy

and resilient Port

City

30% A detailed approved

Master Plan for Lamu

Port City

A detailed approved

Integrated transport

Master Plan

20% 30% 20% - - 500M


89


5.0 Programme Name: LAND ADMINISTRATION

Objective: To secure rights in land and natural resources

Outcome: Accessible spatial information to users

Data reliability and uniformity with the National & International standards

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

5.1: Surveying

& Mapping

Accessible spatial

information to

users

Data reliability

and uniformity

with the National

& International

standards

10% No. of maps & plans

digitized & geo-

referenced

20% 20% 20% 20% 10% 10M

Data

standardization

with National

system

10 controls No. of controls &

distribution

10 10 10 10 10 50M

Seamless and

prompt access to

land information

0 A functional digital

land information

system

0 30% 30% 30% 30% 60M

Secured public

utilities

20% No. of public utilities

planned and

surveyed

10% 20% 20% 30% - 50,M


90


5.0 Programme Name: LAND ADMINISTRATION

Objective: To secure rights in land and natural resources

Outcome: Accessible spatial information to users

Data reliability and uniformity with the National & International standards

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

5.2: Land

banking in

selected urban

areas

Additional land

set

aside/purchased

for development

20% Acreage of land

designated/purchased

for development of

public utilities

5% 5% 10% 20% - 10M

5.3 Settlements

&

Regularization

Guaranteed land

tenure security.

Enabled business

environment.

knowledgeable

population on

land matters

especially

related to land

leasing

5 No. of conventional

settlements planned

& surveyed

3 4 4 4 4 100M

Security of

tenure

Enhanced local

livelihoods

30 No. of regularization

settlements planned

& surveyed

10 10 10 10 10 200M


91


5.0 Programme Name: LAND ADMINISTRATION

Objective: To secure rights in land and natural resources

Outcome: Accessible spatial information to users

Data reliability and uniformity with the National & International standards

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

Security of

tenure

Enhanced local

livelihoods

7,000 No. title deeds issued 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000


92


4.4.2 Cross-Sectoral Implementation Considerations

This section should provide the cross-sectoral impacts of each sectoral programme and

appropriate actions to harness cross-sector synergies or mitigate adverse cross-sector impacts.

• Harnessing cross-sector synergies: Indicate what considerations will be made in
respect to harnessing cross-sector synergies arising from possible programme impacts.


• Mitigating adverse cross-sector impacts: State the mitigation measures that may be
adopted to avoid or manage potential adverse cross-sector impacts.


Table 38: Cross-sectoral impacts

Programme

Name

Sector Cross-sector Impact
Measures to Harness or

Mitigate the Impact Synergies Adverse

impact

PHYSICAL

PLANNING

All

sectors

Overall

planning

framework to

facilitate

efficient &

optimal use of

land & other

resources

Restricted

land use that

may lead to

eviction/reloc

ation or

interference

with local

livelihoods

-Laws, policies, strategies

and regulations on use of

land and other resources

-Compensation in case of

eviction

- Resettlement Action plan

-Regularization of Swahili

Villages

HOUSING -

Environ

ment

-

Infrastrac

ture

-Lands&

Physical

planning

-Approval of

building plans

by NEMA

-Prepare Plans

and BQS for

new

construction

work

-Prepare PDP &

Surveying

-Time

overruns due

to approval

process by

NEMA

-inaccuracies

in BQS due to

lack of

expertise

-

- Coordination in

implementation of

programmes

-Employ a qualified QS to

prepare BQs

URBAN

DEVELOP

MENT

-

Environ

ment

-Health

-

-EIAs for better

environmental

planning

-Provide

sanitation and

-EIA may

hinder

development

in urban areas

-Location of

-Streamline requirement for

EIA

- Coordination in

implementation of

programmes


93


Programme

Name

Sector Cross-sector Impact
Measures to Harness or

Mitigate the Impact Synergies Adverse

impact

infrastruc

ture

sewerage

systems

-Ensure

accessibility of

urban areas

infrastructure

may lead to

displacement,

eviction or

relocation

-Compensation in case of

displacement or eviction.

LAND

ADMINIST

RATION

All

sectors

Tools,

procedures and

actions for

enforcement of

plans and laws

-Stringent

national

legislations

that are not in

tandem with

the local

needs &

challenges

- Preparation of county laws

and policies to address the

specific local needs and

challenges

-Awareness creation of the

public on the National and

County laws and policies

GENERAL

ADMINIST

RATION,

PLANNING

&

SUPPORT

SERVICES


All

sectors

-Shared County

vision &

development

objectives

-Coordination

and sharing of

knowledge,

expertise &

equipments

among the

various sectors

-Some sectors

are give more

attention

compared to

others in

regard to

resource

allocation.

This may lead

to

underperform

ance of the

neglected

sectors

-Need for establishment of

County Planning Units to

coordinate the various

sectors to ensure strategic

and optimal utilization of

resources.

-Adequate consultations of

various stakeholders during

the preparation of County

-Alignment of the

programmes & projects in

the CIDP with the County

Spatial Plan


4.5 Flagship /County Transformative Projects

These are projects with high impact in terms of employment creation, increasing county

competitiveness, revenue generation etc. They may be derived from the Kenya Vision 2030

(to be implemented in collaboration with the National Government) or from the County

Transformative Agenda. Projects cutting across county borders (cross-county and country

projects) should be clearly indicated in this section.


94


Table 13: Flagship /County Transformative Projects

Project

Name

Location Objecti

ve

Output

/Outcom

e

Performa

nce

indicators

Timefra

me

(Start-

End)

Implem

enting

Agencie

s

Cost

(Ksh.)

1.Land

mapping

,Regularizat

ion, &

tittling

Countyw

ide

To

enhance

tenure

security

Enabled

business

environm

ent

25,000

title deeds

issued

FY

2018/20

19-FY

2021/20

22

CGL

Ministry

of Land

500M

2.Developm

ent of

Integrated

Strategic

Urban

Developme

nt Plan

Mokowe,

Amu,

Hindi,

Mpeketo

ni, Witu,

Faza,

Kiunga,

Kizingiti

ni

To

Create

sustaina

ble

settleme

nts

Enhanced

service

provision

8 planned

urban

areas

FY

2018/20

19

CGL

Ministry

of

Transpor

t

240M

3.Integrated

County

housing

scheme

Countyw

ide

To

facilitate

producti

on of

decent

and

affordab

le

housing

to

County

Increased

revenue

collection

1000Units FY

2018/20

19-FY

2021/20

22

CGL

Ministry

of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperat

ion

LAPFU

ND

625M


95

4.2.3 Infrastructure, Energy & ICT

Vision: To be a global leader in transport & communication, infrastructure and energy

provision.

Mission: To develop, operate and sustain world class transport communication, infrastructure

and energy.

Sector/ Subsector composition: Infrastructure, Energy, ICT

Subsector mandates:

Energy:

The sub sector is mandated to undertake: National Energy Policy and Management;

Hydropower Development; Geothermal Exploration and Development; Thermal Power

Development; Rural Electrification Programme; Renewable Energy Promotion and

Development and; Energy Regulation, Security and Conservation.

Infrastructure:

• Maintenance of existing road network county wide.

• Upgrading of existing roads to bitumen or gravel standards to make them all weather

• To ensure all public works are correctly designed and with all necessary approvals.

• The department will act as a link between the county government and the community

• Ensure adheareness to construction codes and specification

• Ensure establishment of a county roads board.

• Ensure establishment of a county roads Fund.

• Provide consultative services to other departments within the county government.


ICT

• To facilitate the development of ICT infrastructure that supports and enables the
provision of a multiplicity of applications and services to meet the needs of the county

and its people.

• To use information technology to enhance efficiency and accountability in public
service delivery.

• To establish mechanisms to facilitate public communication and access to information
in the form of media with widest public outreach in the County.

• To facilitate the establishment of structures for citizen participation


96


Table 11: Sector Programmes

Programme Name: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT SERVICES.

Objective: To coordinate the sectoral functions such as personnel, operations and capacity building.

Outcome: Effective and efficient service delivery to the residents of lamu.

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Administration and

Planning

Improved public service

delivery and customer

care

0 Percentage of staff with

Increased knowledge of

staff on customer care.

40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 20M

Improved service

accessibility

0 Percentage increase of

residents accessing

services

40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10M

Quality project delivery,

co-ordination &

implementation

0 No of projects cordially

implemented

40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 20M

Human Resource

development.

Improved productivity

and efficiency of staff

1 Architect

1 Engineer

4 Artisans

% increase of staff

productivity and

efficiency

50% 30% 20% 20% 10% 70M

Operations & Services


Proper project co-

ordination and improved

project delivery

50% % increase of well

coordinated completed

projects

40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 5M


97


Programme Name : : ROADS INFRASTRUCTURE

Objective: To improve & upgrade roads to all weather roads

Outcome: Improved road network

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Planning and Design Safe standard and

well planned

designs

10% % increase in completed well

planned developments

40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15M

Roads infrastructure

Development

To provide

connectivity
40% Length of Roads and

walkways


50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 100M

Routine Roads

Infrastructure

Maintenance

To improve

motorability.

30% % increase of Roads and

walkways maintained


40% 40% 40% 40% 30% 50M

Drainage Infrastructure

Development &

Maintenance

To improve

motorability,

improve drainage

and make it all

weather road

40% % Increase of. of roads in

good and working conditions

30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 160M

Storm water

infrastructure

development

To improve access,

motorability,

improve drainage

and make them all

weather roads

20% % increase percentage

increase of paved roads.


15% 15% 15% 10% 10% 30M

25% Percentage increases the No.

of all weather roads.

10% 10% 10% 0 0 20M

40% Percentage increase in size

of storm water drainage

coverage

30% 30% 20% 20% 0 15M

Bridges Construction &

maintenance

Improve

connectivity and

0% No. of footbridges

constructed

1 1 0 0 0 30M


98


reduced traffic

congestion

0% No. of foot bridges

maintained

1 1 0 0 0 15M


Programme Name: TRANSPORT

Objective:

Outcome: To ensure safe and reliable road transport system

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Road Safety Ease of access,

connectivity and

road safety

0% % Reduction of road

accidents

10 10 10 10 0 50, 000,000

Construction & Maintenance

of Public Transport Facilities

Improved public

transport system

0% % Increase in working

Standard public transport

facilities


1 1 0 0 0 25,000,000

Traffic Management &

Control

Improved ease of

movement

0% % Increase of efficiency

in traffic management


30% 1 1 1 0 20,000,000

County Transport Services Efficient

County transport

services.


30%

% Increase in transport

efficiency


50% 30% 10% 10% 10% 40,000,000

County Public Sea Transport Improved

connectivity

between the

mainland and the

islands

0% % Increase in safe reliable

efficient public sea transport

30% 40% 50% 30% 30% 200,000,000


99


Programme Name: PUBLIC WORKS

Objective: Design, supervise and maintenance of institutional & private buildings

Outcome: Maintained & repaired government institutional Buildings.

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance Indicators Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Building Services Improved

building

standards

20% % Increase of safe, sound &

standard building constructed.

60 45 40 30 0 20,000,000

Structural Services Improved safety

and sound

structures

50% % Increase of safe, sound structure

constructed.


30% 20% 20% 20% 10% 120,000,000

Electrical works:

Public & Street

Lighting)

Improved

visibility,

security& safety


30% % Decrease of crime incidents


30% 25% 20% 20% 0% 85,000,000

Public & Street

Lighting

Maintenance

30% 30% 25% 20% 20% 0% 25,000,000

Total 250,000,000


100


Programme Name: ENERGY

Objective: Reduce risk of fire outbreaks

Outcome: Ensure all bulk petroleum storage facilities meet minimum standards
Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Electricity, gas

Reticulation and

energy regulation

Regulated

Energy

infrastructure

0% % Increase in safe

reliable regulated

energy sources


40%


40%


40%


40%


10%


50,000,000

Access to

electrification

Improve living

standards

20% % Increase in markets

& homesteads with

access to electricity

40% 30% 30%


30%


30%


50,000,000

Electrical works(

Public & Street

Lighting)

Improved

visibility&

Security in the

region/county

50% % Decrease in

criminal No. of

lighting points

installed


40% 30% 30%


30%


30%


75,000,000

Public & Street

Lighting

Maintenance

Improved

security in the

region/county

200 40% 30% 30%


30%


30%


25,000,000

Total 200,000,000


101


Pogramme

Name
Sector Cross-sector Impact Measures to Harness or Mitigate the Impact

Synergies Adverse impact

Roads Infrastructure Environmental degradation

i.e. Cutting down of trees

leading to climate change.

Change of land use.

Loss of bio-diversity. Ensure that development projects complied to environmental impact assessment

regulation. Planting of trees.

General

administration &

support service

Infrastructure Environmental degradation
i.e. Cutting down of trees

leading to climate change.

Change of land use.

Loss of bio-diversity.

Climate change
Ensure that development projects complied to environmental impact assessment

regulation. Planting of trees.

Transport


Infrastructure Air and water pollution. Marine pollution
which leads to loss

bio- diversity,

respiratory diseases.

To embrass modern transport system that will produce less pollution. To regulate oil

mashrooming.

Public Works Infrastructure Environmental degradation
i.e. Cutting down of trees

leading to climate change.

Change of land use.

Loss of bio-diversity.

Climate change
Ensure that development projects complied to environmental impact assessment

regulation. Planting of trees.


102

4.2.4 General Economic and Commercial Affairs


This is a very key sector in the county as it significantly contributes towards generation of

income and employment through tourism and trade development thus promoting self-

employment as well as ensuring optimal collection, distribution and utilization of the scarce

resources.


Sector Composition

The general economic and commercial affairs sector consists of the following sub-sectors

namely:


• Finance;

• Budget and Economic Planning;

• Trade, Investment and Industry;

• Tourism.

• Cooperative development


Vision

A globally competitive economy with sustainable and equitable socio-economic development


Mission

To promote, co-ordinate and implement integrated socio-economic policies and programs for a

rapidly industrializing economy


Strategic Objectives

a. To provide leadership and coordination in county development planning, policy
formulation and management;

b. To design effective, efficient and secure systems of collecting revenue;
c. Ensuring compliance with policies, standards, procedures and applicable financial and

procurement laws and regulations;

d. To provide accurate market information to SMEs through the establishment Business
Information Centre (BIC);

e. To position Lamu as an investment hub and highlighting key opportunities;
f. To promote consumer protection and fair trade practices;
g. To develop County Industrial Parks;
h. To establish market infrastructure; and
i. To coordinate and facilitate the management and control of county trade and tourism

related activities and programs

j. To develop, brand and promote county specific trade and tourism programs and
projects

k. To develop and promote county tourism Infrastructure.
l. Promote cooperative movement in the county


103


Sub Sector: County Treasury


Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Total

Budget

Staff

development

Improved

work

performance

and

employee

satisfaction

% in

attaining set

targets per

year

0 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Employee

satisfaction

index

0 0 40% 50% 60% 70%

% of the

trained and

sensitized

staff

40% 60% 70% 80% 90%


Programme 1: General Administration, Planning and Support Services

Objective (s): To enhance efficiency in service delivery

Outcome (s): Improved performance and employee satisfaction


104


Programme 2: Public Finance Management

Objective (s): To enhance efficiency and effectiveness in utilization of public resources

Outcome (s): Enhanced efficiency and effectiveness in utilization of public resources

Sub-

Programme

Key Outcome Key Performance

Indicators

Baseline Planned Targets Total Budget
(Kshs.)

Miillion 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 2022/23

Budget

Coordination and

Management

Improved compliance to

budget requirements

improved compliance to

budget requirements

Improved compliance to

budget requirements

% Of Adherence to budget

cycle

70 100 100 100 100


% Absorption of the

annually approved budget

70% 80% 85% 90% 95% 100%

Accounting,

reporting

services and

auditing

Improved level of

efficiency, transparency

and accountability

Percentage of incidences of

corruption reported ruption

Index


% Of pending bills in

relation to the budget


% Adherence to financial

reporting cycle

70 100 100 100 100

Supply chain

management

Improved compliance to

procurement regulations
% Level of compliance

with Public Procurement

Regulations

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%


% Of women, youths and

PWD accessing

Government tenders

30% 30% 30% 30% 30%


Public

Participation and

Sensitization

Increased public

participation in Planning,

budgeting and decision

making

% Of wards and villages

engaged in planning,

budgeting and Project

Implementation

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%


105


Programme 3: County Economic Planning, Policy Formulation, Monitoring & Evaluation

Objective (s): To enhance evidence based policy development

Outcome (s): Evidence based policies and plans

Sub-programme Key Outcome Key Performance Indicators Baseline
Planned Targets Total

Budget

Ksh. (M)
2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 2022/23

County policies and

economic

documentation

Informed

priorities and

resources

allocation

No. of economic surveys 0 - - - - 1 100M

No of statistical Abstracts 1 - 1 - 1 -

No of CIDPs 1 1 - - - 1

No of ADPs 4 1 1 1 1 1

No of Sectoral Plans 0 - - 9 - -

Community

Information

Disclosure


Increased

access to

information and

by Lamu

community

% Population accessing

information on county planning

and budgeting

- 10% 20% 40% 80% 100%

Number of popular version of

key documents published and

distributed

0 8 8 8 8 8

Number of persons accessing

the Lamu county website
1000 5000 6000 10000 10000 10000

M&E policy developd and

opertaionalized
0 1 - - - -

Monitoring,

Evaluation and

Reporting


Improved

implementation

of projects

No of County Annual M&E

Progress Reports
1 1 1

1


1 1

CIDP Review Reports 1 - - 1 - -

No. of County Public

Expenditure Reviews
- 1 1 1 1

No of CIDP indicators

handbook
0 - - - -1 -

No of projects uploaded in

M&E system
0 20 50


106


Programme 4: Revenue Management

Objective (s): To realize optimum revenue collection and monitoring

Outcome (s) Increased revenue

Sub-

programme

Key Outcome Key Performance

Indicators

Baseline Planned Targets Total
Budget Ksh.

(M) 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 2022/23

Revenue

Management

Increased OSR

streams

Mapping of revenue

streams

0 1 2 2 2 2 130,000,000

% of revenue collected

through automated

system

80% 85% 90% 95% 100% 100%

% of county budget

financed from OSR

2% 3% 4% 5% 8% 10%


107


Cross-Sectoral Implementation Considerations

Programme / sub

Programme

Sector Cross-sector impact Measures to harness or mitigate the impact

Synergies Adverse Impact

Revenue

Management

Services

All sectors • Adequate and sufficient funding
for projects and programs

• Incomplete implementation of
projects/programs

• Underfunding of projects

• Enforce revenue collection and
increase revenue points.

• Prudent management of resources

• Revenue resource mapping

• ER system

Supply Chain

Management

All sectors • Automation of procurement
procedures

• Timely procurement of services
and projects

• Non completion of projects
within the stipulated timelines

• Litigations

• Increase in project costs

• Missing out on grants

• Adherence to procurement laws and
policies

• Full implementation of IFMIS modules

• Timely requisition of projects and
services by departments

Accounting

Service

All sectors • Timely payments for goods and
services Satisfied

clients

• Inaccurate financial reports

• Low funds absorption rates

• Delays in project/ programs
implementation

• Adverse audit opinions

• Training and capacity building

• Adherence to financial regulations and
procedures as provided for in PFM Act

Monitoring,

Evaluation and

Reporting

All sectors • Improved tracking and
assessment of project

implementation

• Efficient utilisation of resources

• Poor implementation of
projects

• Inaccurate status reporting

• Poor quality of works

• Loss of funds

• Project/program objective will
not be achieved

• Establish M&E unit

• Acquisition and installation of
electronic M&E system

Economic

Planning &

Budgeting

All sectors • Enough resource for
development (resource

mobilization)

• Streamlined allocation of
resources

• Unsustainable decision making
Inadequate resources

• Capacity building of technical staff


108


Programme / sub

Programme

Sector Cross-sector impact Measures to harness or mitigate the impact

Synergies Adverse Impact

• Integrated economic plans

• Improved funds Absorption

• Improved service delivery

• Quality and accountable
governance

• Seamless implementation of
plans

Internal Audit All sectors • Prudent utilization of public
resources

• Misappropriation public
resources

• Inaccurate and misleading audit
reports

• Production of qualify reliable and
timely audit reports


109


Mainstreaming of Cross Cutting Issues

Programme Issue Impacts Adaptation Measure Mitigation Measure

Finance and Economic

planning

Gender &

Vulnerable groups
• low access to

government

procurement

opportunities

• low participation in
budget making and

implementation

processes

• 30% Access to
Government Procurement

Opportunities reservation

to vulnerable groups

• Exemption from 2% bid
bond requirements

• Holding separate budget
forums for special interest

groups

• Exempting people living
with disability from

paying business permit

• Avail information to the concerned
groups

• Capacity building of the vulnerable
groups

• Establishment of affirmative action
(revolving) fund

• Implementation of gender
responsive budgeting

HIV & AIDS Increased incidences of

HIV/AIDS infections

lowers productivity at

service delivery points

• Encourage and support use
of Anti-retroviral drugs

• Investing in the HIV
prevention interventions.

• Improving the quality of
life of both the infected

and affected.

• Mainstreaming HIV and
AIDS in all county

departmental activities.

• Initiate counseling and testing
programs,

• Promote condom use for
prevention

• Establish HIV/AIDS Coordinating
Units

• Up scaling awareness creation and
behaviour change campaigns

through the local FM radio stations

and social media.

Environment • • Encourage compliance
with EMCA 1999 and

related regulations




110


Trade Sub-Sector


Programme: Trade development

Objective: create conducive business environment

Outcome: growth in business fraternity and generation of more revenue for the county

Sub-

Programme

Key

outcome

indicator

Key Performance Indicators Baseline Planned targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

(Kshs.)

Trade

infrastructural

development

Increased

growth of

business

operation

Percentage increase In

business ventures

35% 60% 60% 70% 80% 80% 25,000,000

Capacity

building

Increased

capacity

building of

entrepreneur

s

Percentage increase of

Entrepreneurs trained

percentage increase in

Identification, mobilization

and facilitation of MSMEs to

participate in Trade Fairs,

shows and exhibition

30% 50% 70% 80% 85% 90% 40,000,000

Trade credit Increase in

business

sustainability

through

access to

credit

Percentage increase of

enterprises access in credit


Percentage increase in

enterprises growth

12.3% 40% 70% 70% 80% 80% 18,000,000

Total 63,000,000


111


Programme: Industrialization and investment

Objective: promote competitive trade and investment in the county

Outcome: productive and sustainable trade and investment developed in the county

Sub-Programme Key outcome

indicator

Key

Performance

Indicators

Baseline Planned targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

(Kshs.)

Industrialization

and Investment

promotion

Increased

investors in the

county

Percentage

increased of locals

entrepreneurs,

engagement in

industries and

enterprises


Percentage

increased in

industries set-up


Percentage

increased in new

investors

0 30% 40% 60% 60% 80% 25,500,000

Total 58,000,000


112


Programme: Trade regulation

Objective: public protection from exploitation

Outcome: standardized packaging of goods

Sub-Programme Key outcome

indicator

Key Performance

Indicators

Baseline Planned targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

(Kshs.)

Weight and

measures services

Improved

standardization

of the packages

Percentage of

ventures complained

with the weights and

measures services

0 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8,000,000

Trade legal

framework

Developed

County

Trade

Investment

policy and

Revise trade

Acts

Number of county

Investment

Policy developed

1 3,000,000

Total 11,000,000


Flagship /County Transformative Projects
These are projects with high impact in terms of employment creation, increasing county competitiveness, revenue generation etc. They may be derived from

the Kenya Vision 2030 (to be implemented in collaboration with the National Government) or from the County Transformative Agenda. Projects cutting

across county borders (cross-county and country projects) should be clearly indicated in this section.

Project

Name

Location Objective Output

/Outcome

Performance indicators Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Industrial

park

Hindi

ward

Promote competitive

trade and investment

in the county

Increased

investors in the

county

Percentage increased in industries set-

up

Percentage increased in new investors

2019-2022 County

Government

of Lamu

1 billion


113


Tourism Sub-Sector

Programme: Expanding, improving and developing tourism support services and infrastructure

Objective: Promoting Lamu as an attractive and competitive destination

Outcome: Increased visitors to Lamu

Sub-

Programme

Key

outcome

indicator

Key Performance Indicators Baseline Planned targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget

(Kshs.)

Tourism

Infrastructural

Development

Increased

usage of

tourism

infrastructure

by the

tourists

Number of tourism information

centres done

1 1 1 1 4,500,000

Number of rehabilitated tourist

areas done

1 1 1 1 1 20,000,000

Number of signage of attraction

sites done

0 1 1 1 1 6,000,000

Number of access roads to

attraction sites

0 1 1 1 1 10,000,000

Percentage improvement of

surrounding environment to

attraction sites

0 30% 40% 60% 75% 10,000,000

Destination

management

Improvement

in

management

of a

destination

Percentage improvement in

coordinated management of

destination elements

0 1 1 1 0 30,000,000

Total 85,500,000


114


Programme: Tourism Development and Regulation

Objective: To have regulations in place for the tourism industry

Outcome: Tourism industry in Lamu effectively regulated

Sub-Programme Outcome Key Performance Indicators Baseline Planned targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

(Kshs.)

Tourism facilities

quality assurance

Improvement in

quality of service in

the tourism industry

Proportion of service providers with

improved service

0 4 4 4 6,000,000

Existence of legal frameworks 0 1 1 1 6,000,000

Capacity building Improved capacity of

service providers

Proportion of improvement in

competency in service delivery

2 2 2 2 2 8,000,000

Number of tourism ground handlers

empowered including Youth, women and

PWDs

300 350 400 400 450 25,000,000

Number of bench marking activities for

tourism players done

0 1 2 2 1 10,000,000

Tourism

Information

development

Improving availability

and accessibility of

tourism information

Percentage increase in access to

information

20% 40% 60% 80% 90% 10,000,000

Policy, Research

and Statistics

Number of legal

documents available

Number of policies developed 0 1 3,000,000

Existence of database 0 1 1 1 1 5,000,000

Existence of research reports 0 1 1 1 1 10,000,000

Total 83,000,000


115


Programme: Tourism products development and marketing

Objective: To increase variety of the tourism products

Outcome: Increased number of competitive tourism products

Sub-

Programme
Key outcome indicator Key Performance Indicators Baseline

Planned targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total Budget

(Kshs.)

Tourism

products

development

Improving and

diversifying tourism

products

Number of new tourism products improved 2 2 2 2 2 25,000,000

Number of new tourism products developed 6 1 1 1 1 80,000,000

Tourism

marketing and

promotion

Increased awareness of

Lamu as a unique tourist

destination

Percentage increase in visitors 25% 35% 50% 60% 70% 25,000,000

Number of events participated in 3 5 5 6 6 25,000,000

Number of documentaries developed 0 12 6 5 5 14,000,000

Number of documentaries posted and promoted on

social media platforms

You tube


0


12


6


5


5


5,000,000

Face book 0 12 6 5 5 2,800,000

Instagram 0 12 6 5 5 2,800,000

Tweeter 0 12 6 5 5 2,800,000

Trip advisor 0 12 6 5 5 1,000,000

Number of tourism promotional materials branded 4 4 3 3 3 15,000,000

Consultative

stakeholder

forums

% increase in stakeholder

involvement

Number of consultative stakeholder forums held 1 2 2 2 1 4,000,000


116


Total 202,400,000


Programme: Administration Planning and Support services

Objective: To have a well developed service quality management

Outcome: Improved Service Delivery

Sub-Programme Key outcome

indicator

Key Performance Indicators Baseline Planned targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year

4

Year

5

Total Budget

(Kshs.)

Improved working

Environment

Efficiency in

service delivery

Number of offices acquired 10,000,000

Furniture set up 2,000,000

Number of office Computers bought 2,000,000

Staff development % change in

productivity of

staff

Number of staff hired 4 2 1 1 1 9,000,000

Number of staff trained 2 4 4 4 4 5,000,000

Total 28,000,000


117


Cross-Sectoral Implementation Considerations

Table 39: Cross-sectoral impacts

Trade, Tourism and Industrialization

P1: Expanding,

Improving And

Developing

Tourism

Products

Land, Water, Roads,

Environment &

Finance

Improved access to

touristic attraction sites,

amenities,

accommodation and

secure attractions.

Poor access to attraction

sites, insecurity, poorly

maintained amenities.

Conservation of touristic sites;

development of county tourism legal

frameworks and partnership with KFS,

KWS and relevant county sectors in

tourism promotion.

P2: Tourism

Development

and Regulation

Education, Finance,

Legal affairs & ICT

Tourism industry

expansion in acquisition

of proper skills and

knowledge required in the

industry for efficient

service delivery

Poor service delivery in the

industry due to lack of

capacity of the players

Adoption of appropriate modern tourism

concepts and technology through capacity

building programs

P3: Tourism

product

development

and Marketing

Energy, Infrastructure,

ICT, Social protection,

Culture and

Recreation

Improves the

County Economy

Through the Tourism

multiplier effect

Poor marketing strategies

And un tapped tourism

products

Ensuring proper marketing of the

destination through developing tourism

documentaries and publicizing on various

social media platforms.

Branding of the destination

P4: General

Administration,

Planning and

Support

Services

All sectors Communication and

coordination of county

operations; conducive

working environment

Ineffective communication

and administration systems

Setting up clear and effective

communication channels; appropriate

physical infrastructure


118


Sub Sector: Co-Operative

Programme Name: Co-operative Development services

Objective: To develop and strengthen the cooperative movement in order to play leading role in poverty eradication employment creation

and socio-economic transformation of the county

Outcome: viable and sustainable Cooperative Enterprise

Sub Programme Key Outcome Key

performance

Indicators

Baseline Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Revive Fishermen,

Livestock and

Agricultural based

Cooperatives

Improved members

income and market

access

No of well

managed and

vibrant

marketing

Cooperatives

2 2 4 7 8 9 38,200,000

Promotion of new

strategic cooperative

for youth and women

Established women

and youth

cooperatives

No of youth

and women

saccos

5 8 11 14 17 20 31,000,000

Enforce compliance

with Co-operatives

Act and other

legislation

Improved

governance in the

cooperative

movement

No of

compliant

cooperative

societies

10 15 20 35 40 45 41,550,000

Totals 110,750,000


119

4.2.5 Health Sector

Introduction

Under the Legal Notice Number 137 of 9th August 2013 and in line with the County

Government Act 2012, Lamu County Government is responsible for the following health

service functions including:

1. Promotion of primary health care;
2. County health facilities and pharmacies;
3. Ambulance services: including emergency response and patient referral system;
4. Licensing and control of undertakings that sell food to the public;
5. Enforcement of waste management policies, standards and regulations;


For delivery of these services the county health sector in line with the Vision 2030 and Kenya

Health policy framework (2012-2030) developed its vision and mission for the county, the

objectives are adopted from the Kenya health policy framework, policy objectives


Vision Statement

A competitive and responsive healthcare delivery system for all


Mission Statement

To provide leadership and quality health and sanitation services that are sustainable,

affordable, acceptable and accessible to the community

Objectives


1. Eliminate communicable conditions
1 Halt and reverse rising burden of non-communicable conditions
2 Reduce the burden of violence and injuries
3 Provide essential health services
4 Minimize exposure to health risk factors
5 Strengthen collaboration with health related sectors


The sector agenda envisages to improve access to and quality of health care, utilization of

health services and address financial protection of the population as well as client/patient

satisfaction, Two mega projects have been identified as the sectors Flagship projects:


1, Registration of 20,000 households to NHIF

2. Digitization of all health facilities to support quality of care.


120


Programme Name: Administration, Planning and Monitoring & Evaluation

Objective To ensure effective and efficient health service delivery in the county

Outcome: Efficiency in Health service delivery

Sub Programme Key Outcome Key Performance Indicator Baseline Planned Target

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

TOTAL

BUDGET

1.1:HRManagement&

Development

Motivated health staff

delivering quality health

services

% of clients satisfied with health

services

No data 70 80 85 90 90 3,584,000,000

No of nurses per 100,000 population 134 150 170 190 210 228

SP. 1.2 Planning, Monitoring

& Evaluation

Programs well monitored

and evaluated.

Proportion of health units with annual

work plans

31 90 95 100 100 100 65,000,000

SP.1.3 Leadership and

Governance

Effective leadership and

management of the health

sector

No of county health stakeholders

forum meetings held

3 4 4 4 4 4 27,500,000

No of county health sector policies and

legislations passed by County

Assembly

0 2 1 1 1 1

S.P 1.4 Health Products &

Technologies

Improved access to high

quality, affordable health

products

Proportion of health facilities reporting

stock outs of tracer commodities for

more than 2 weeks

No data 25 20 15 10 10 1,025,000,000

S.P 1.5: Health Financing Reduced out-of-pocket

health expenditure

Proportion of residents covered by the

National Health Insurance Fund

13 50 60 70 80 95 625,000,000

% of the county government budget

allocated to the health sector

29 32 33 34 35 36

S.P1.6:Health

Infrastructure(buildings and

equipment

Increased access to health

services

% of population living within 5km of a

health facility

80 85 85 87 89 90 650,000,000

Proportion of health facilities equipped

as per the norms and standards

No data 60 70 90 95 100


121


Programme Name: Preventive and Promotive Health services

Objective

Outcome:

Sub Programme Key Outcome KPI Baseline Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total

Budget

S.P 2.1 Reproductive,

Maternal, Child &

Adolescent health

(RAMCHA)

Better health for

women ,children and

adolescents

Proportion of pregnant women making at least 4

ANC visits

82 85 87 89 90 93 86,000,000

Proportion of women of child bearing age

receiving family planning commodities

59 63 77 80 82 87

% of deliveries conducted by Skilled birth

attendants

65 68 70 73 77


85

% of children <1year fully immunized 76 78 82 85 87 90

S.P 2.2 Non-

Communicable Diseases

Prévention & Control

Reduction in number

of new cases of NCDs

and improve quality of

life of those diagnosed.

No. of new cases of diabetes 1930 1950 1980 2000 2030 2050 55,000,000

No of new cases of hypertension 5207 5270 5320 5400 5600 5700

Proportion of women of child bearing age

screened for cervical cancer

9.7 12 15 18 23 30

S.P 2.3 Communicable

Diseases Control

Reduced incidence of

communicable diseases

of public health

importance

TB case notification per 100,000 population 324 356 392 432 475 523 70,000,000

% of infants born to HIV+ mothers who are

infected

8.9 7 6 5 5 4

Proportion of children below one year issued with

LLINs

98 100 100 100 100 100

S.P.2.4 Health Promotion

and Nutrition

Residents adopt health

promoting practices

Children under five attending CWC clinic who

are stunted

20.3 20 19.8 19.5 19 17 52,000,000

Proportion of newborns with low birth weight 3.8 3.5 3.2 3.0 2.8 2.5


122


(<2500gms)


123


Programme Name: Curative and Rehabilitative Services

Objective

Outcome:

Sub Programme Key Outcome KPI Baseline Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total

Budget

SP 3.1 Rehabilitation

services

No. of health facilities upgraded with

disability friendly infrastructure

2 5 7 10 15 20 60,000,000

S.P 3.2 County referral

services

Effective continuity of

care across service

delivery levels

No. of functional ambulances as per the

ideal number specified in the county

referral strategy

4 9


9 9 9 9 123,000,000

Proportion of viral load, EID and gene

expert samples with valid results sent to

the requesting facility

25 50 55 60 70 80

S.P 3.3 Hospital Services Equitable access to high

quality specialized services

Institutional maternal mortality ratio 361 350 310 290 270 250 301,000,000

Hospital average length of stay 4 3.5 3 3 2.5 2.5

SP.3.4 Primary Health

services

Equitable access to high

quality primary health care

Per capita outpatient utilization rate 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.2 70,000,000

% of primary health facilities offering

BEmONC services

75 79 80 92 95 100

S.P 3.5 Health

Management Information

Timely and reliable

information

% of health facilities submitting timely

reports

85 90 90 95 95 98 220,000,000


124


System
No of facilities with an electronic medical

records system

0 2 4 7 9 10


125

Cross-Sectoral Implementation Considerations

This section should provide the cross-sectoral impacts of each sectoral programme and

appropriate actions to harness cross-sector synergies or mitigate adverse cross-sector impacts.

• Harnessing cross-sector synergies: Indicate what considerations will be made in
respect to harnessing cross-sector synergies arising from possible programme impacts.


• Mitigating adverse cross-sector impacts: State the mitigation measures that may be
adopted to avoid or manage potential adverse cross-sector impacts.


Table 40: Cross-sectoral impacts

Programme Name Sector
Cross-sector Impact

Measures to Harness or

Mitigate the Impact

Synergies
Adverse

impact


Curative & Rehabilitative

services

Health Improve labor

productivity

Bio medical

waste has

negative impact

on environment

Modern medical waste

management system.

Preventive & Promotive

Health Services


Health Increasing

household

purchasing

power

Un intended

consequences

of medical

interventions

can result in

adverse effects.

Strengthen quality assurance

measures.

General Administration,

Planning & Support

Services


Health Enhance

efficiency and

effectiveness

Duplication of

activities

resulting in

wastage of

resources.

Multi sectoral and inter

sectoral approaches


126

4.2.6 Education

Sector Composition: Education, vocational training and ECDE


Vision: To have improved literacy and technical skills


Mission: To provide quality early childhood education and vocational training that will

enable Lamu people to participate in the development.


Sector/ subsector Goal

1. To provide quality and effective education systems for ECD and vocational training
2. To facilitate quality teaching and learning resources in the institutions

3. To provide literacy, skills, attitude, norms and knowledge for future generation

4. To enhance employability of the trainees

5. Increase access to education.

Sector/subsector Development Needs

1. Quality Educational infrastructure

2. Quality learning & teaching resources

3. Personnel resourcing

4. Improved education enrolment, retention and transition


Priorities and Strategies

1. Infrastructure development through construction, equipping and rehabilitation of ECD

and TVETs.

2. Education improvement through provision of learning and teaching resources, hiring

of qualified personnel and in service training.

3. Community sensitization and mobilization


127


Programme Name: General Administration, Planning and Support Services

Objective: To facilitate general administrative functions of the Education sector

Outcome: Improved service delivery

Sub Programme Key

Outcome

Baseline Key

performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Planning and operations

Improved

efficiency

in service

delivery

50% 1. Percentage

increase in

efficiency in

operations.

60% 70% 80% 90% 100%


169.65M
80% 2.Increased

coordination

among the staff

90% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Human Capital Improved

staff

productivity

and

efficiency

80% 1.Percentage

increase in

competency

90% 100% 100% 100% 100%

169.65M
60% 2. Percentage

increase in

efficiency,

effectiveness and

satisfaction.

70% 70% 90% 90% 100%


128


ECDE

Programme Name: ECDE

Objective: To provide quality and effective ECDE education in Lamu County

Outcome: Improved literacy level

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Infrastructure Improved

availability and

accessibility of

ECD education

86% 1.Percentageincrease

in enrolment to

ECDE

88% 90% 92% 94% 96%

152M

60% 2.Percentage

improvement in the

quality of education

70% 80% 90% 100% 100%

Education

Improvement

Improved

quality and

effective ECDE

education.

86% 1. Increased rate of

enrolment to ECDE

86% 90% 95% 100% 100%

55M

98% 2. Increased rate of

retention in ECDE

98% 100% 100% 100% 100%

98% 3.Increased rate of
transition from

ECDE to primary

100% 100% 100% 100% 100%


40% 4.Increased level of

competency.

45% 50% 55% 60% 70%

60% 5.Improve the rate

of teacher-pupils

ratio

65% 70% 75% 80% 85%


129


Vocational Training

Programme Name: Vocational Training

Objective: To equip Lamu people with relevant technical skills

Outcome: Employability and self-reliance among the people of Lamu County enhanced

Sub

Programme

Key

Outcome

Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets Total

Budget Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Infrastructure

Improved

accessibility

of TVET

education

25% 1.Increase in the rate of

enrolment to vocational

training centres

30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 558.2M

40% 2.Percentage improvement in

the quality of education

45% 50% 55% 60% 70%

Education

Improvement

Employability

and self-

reliance

among the

people of

Lamu County

enhanced

60% Enhanced rate of

employability for graduates

65% 70% 75% 85% 90% 65M


130


Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Education

Programme Name: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary institutions

Objective: To facilitate the provision of quality and effective education in Lamu County

Outcome: Improved performance

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline
Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Total

Budget

Infrastructure
Improved accessibility

of education

70% Increased rate of enrolment

in schools

75% 80% 85% 90% 90% 20M

40% Improved quality of

education

45% 50% 55% 65% 70%

Education

Improvement
Improved performance

60% Increased rate of enrolment

in primary, secondary and

tertiary institutions

60% 65% 70% 75% 80% 615M

30% Increased rate of transition

from secondary to tertiary

institutions

30% 35% 40% 45% 50%

40% Increased level of

competency

45% 50% 60% 70% 70%


131


Table 12: Cross-sectoral impacts

Programme

Name
Sector Cross- Sector Impact

Measures to Harness or Mitigate the

Impact


Synergies Adverse Impact

ECDE Education 1. Construction of ECDE
centres will create

employment opportunities

as well as improve

accessibility and enrolment
rate.

2. Education improvement
through school feeding

programme will ensure high

retention rate.

3. Monitoring and evaluation
will help to keep track on

the project implementation

as per the set goals.

1. Construction of ECDE
centres will likely

impact negatively on

environment. It may

also create land
ownership conflicts.

2. The school feeding
programme may not be

sustainable.

3. Monitoring and
evaluation can be

misconstrued as witch

hunt.

1. Equipping ECDE centres with
furniture, teaching and learning

resources as well as employing

staff. Full compliance with

NEMA regulation, acquisition of
proper legal documents and

development of proper conflicts

resolution mechanismscan help

resolve land conflicts.

2. Create partnerships with other
stakeholders to ensure

sustainability of the school

feeding programme.

3. Keep an updated project status.
Develop participatory monitoring
and evaluation.

Vocational

Training

Education. 1. Construction and
rehabilitation of workshops

will create employment for

Lamu people and improving
the rate of enrolment as

well as employability skills.

2. Diversification of courses
will increase chances of

employments among
graduates. Policy will help

in the implementation of the

TVETs’ goals and

objectives.

3. Monitoring and evaluation
will help to keep track on

the project implementation

as per the set goals.

4. Construction and
rehabilitation of

workshops will likely

impact negatively on
environment. It may

also create land

ownership conflicts.

5. Diversification of
courses may lead to
under utilization of

resources. Policy

implementation can

create conflicts with
policies of other

departments.

1. Monitoring and
evaluation can be

misconstrued as witch
hunt.

1. Equipping vocational training
centres with furniture, ICT

facilities and employing staff.

Diversification of courses offered
at TVETs. Full compliance with

NEMA regulation, acquisition of

proper legal documents and

development of proper conflicts

resolution mechanisms.

2. Capitation to subsidize the TVET
fees will help in higher enrolment

and retention of students.

Interdepartmental sharing of
policies will counter

departmental conflicts.

3. Keep an updated project status.
Develop participatory monitoring

and evaluation.

Primary,

Secondary

and tertiary

Education. 1. Supporting construction and
renovation of school

infrastructure will increase

the rate of enrolment and
improve the general outlook

of the school.

2. Education improvement
through provision of

bursaries and scholarships
will enhance school

retention rate. Supporting

achievers’ academy and

facilitating common exams

will encourage students’
competition which will in

turn improve performance.

Training of examiners will

equip the teachers with

necessary skills on setting
and marking exams hence

improve students’

performance.

3. Monitoring and evaluation
will help to keep track on

1. Construction and
renovation of school

infrastructure may have

negative impact on
environment. Double

funding which may lead

to corruption. It will

also create land

ownership conflicts.

2. Education improvement
through provision of

bursaries may lead to

dependency syndrome.

Achievers’ academy,
facilitation of common

exams and training of

examiners may lead to

double funding because

they are National
Government functions.

3. Monitoring and
evaluation can be

misconstrued as witch

hunt. It is prone to abuse

1. Due diligent and facts finding
before supporting construction of

any school infrastructure. Full

compliance with NEMA
regulation, acquisition of proper

legal documents and

development of proper conflicts

resolution mechanisms.

2. Provision of full scholarship to
needy and very bright students.

Partnering with national schools

where common exams can be

requested for and achievers’

academy undertaken.

3. Keep an updated project status.
Develop participatory monitoring

and evaluation. Due diligence

and facts finding to avoid double

funding.


132


the project implementation

as per the set goals.

due to double funding.


4.2.6 Public Administration and Internal Relations Sector

This sector consists of the Presidency and Cabinet Affairs office, County executive, National

Assembly, County assembly, Foreign Affairs, Public Service, The National Treasury, County

Treasury, Ministry of Devolution and Planning, Kenya National Audit office.


Vision A leading sector in public policy formulation, implementation, coordination,

supervision and prudent resource management.


Mission The mission is to provide overall leadership and policy direction in resource

mobilization, management and accountability for quality public service delivery.


Response to the Sector Vision and Mission

The sector will spearhead development planning and ensure efficient and effective use of

resources to maximize the value of all the funds availed in the county. This will be through

coordination of planning and sharing of activities undertaken by different partners in the

county. All sectors will plan together and where possible establish joint implementation in

large projects that provide value to the local community.


133

Development Priorities and strategies


Sector programmes

PROGRAMME NAME: ADMNISTRATION AND COORDINATION

Objective: To oversee the running of the various departments and other county entities

Outcome: Efficient delivery of quality Services

Sub

Programme

Key

outcome/Output

Baseline Key performance indicators Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total

Budget (Ksh.)

Administrative

Support

Service

Efficient delivery

and better

coordination of

county Services
0

Number of Citizen grievance redress

mechanism established 0 1 0 0 0 500,000

0 Number of village units established 0 26 26 0 0 25,000,000

0

Number of County printing press

established 0 0 1 0 0 20,000,000

12 Number of motor vehicles purchased 1 1 5 5 0 60,000,000

0

Number of Subcounty HeadQuarter offices

constructed 0 2 0 0 0 700,000,000

0

Number of Governor's residential houses

constructed 0 1 0 0 0 106,000,000

Public

Participation

And Civic

Education

Informed citizens

on devolution

matters and civic

rights

3000 % improvement level of informed citizens 30% 50% 70% 90% 98% 11,830,000

20 Number of public forums conducted 40 40 40 40 40 2,000,000

County

policing

Enhanced

coordination on

peace and

0 Lamu county Policing Oversight

Authority established

0 1 0 0 0 10,000,000


134


PROGRAMME NAME: ADMNISTRATION AND COORDINATION

Objective: To oversee the running of the various departments and other county entities

Outcome: Efficient delivery of quality Services

Sub

Programme

Key

outcome/Output

Baseline Key performance indicators Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total

Budget (Ksh.)

security matters

in the county
0 % reduction in crime level in the county 30% 50% 60% 65% 70%

5,000,000

Fomulation of

county laws

and polies

Improved

County

legislation
3 Number of policies and bills formulated 1 6 6 6 6 15,000,000

0 Number of staff trained on policy

formulation and legislation procedures

25 50 70 80 90 12,000,000

Enforcement

Of County

Laws

Improved

compliance of

County Laws

25% % execution level of county laws 35% 50% 65% 75% 90% 82,000,000

County legal

service

Improved legal

Compliance

45% % bills drafted as per departmental

requests

60% 100

%

100

%

100

%

100

%

1,850,000

N/A Number of legal compliance audits 1 2 2 2 2 2,000,000

N/A % litigations attended to and resolved 10% 30% 60% 70% 80% 20,000,000


135

Programme Name: Public Safety And Social Order

Objective: To mitigate the negative effect of drug abuse and contribute to the well being of the society

Outcome: Minimized drug/alcohol consumption, drug trafficking and pornography practices in the county

Sub

Programme

Key outcome Baseline Key performance indicators Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total Budget

(Ksh.)
Drugs, Alcohol

and

Pornography

Control

Minimized drug

and alcohol

consumption,

drug trafficking

and pornography

practices in the

county

3000
% Reduction in drug consumption
among men and women

30% 50% 65% 75% 85% 7,000,000

1800
% Reduction in alcohol
consumption among men and

women

10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 4,500,000

1600
% Reduction in ponorgraphy

practices among women
10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 3,800,000

Marine safety Reduced

incidences of

marine related

accidents

0 Marine safety policy formulation 0 1 0 0 0
5,000,000

0
No. of County marine rescue

units established
0 2 1 1 0

20,000,000

200
No.of people sensitized on marine

safety
1 1500 2500 3000 3500

12,000,000

Drought

Management

Ending Drought

Emergencies 0
County Drought management bill

passed
0 1 0 0 0

2,000,000

0

No. Functional Disaster

Management Committees at ward

levels established

0 5 2 3 0

20,000,000

0
No. of county programmes

implementing DRR
3 5 5 5

4,000,000

0
No.of food security Assessment

done
1 4 4 4 4

4,000,000


136


Programme Name: Public Safety And Social Order

Objective: To mitigate the negative effect of drug abuse and contribute to the well being of the society

Outcome: Minimized drug/alcohol consumption, drug trafficking and pornography practices in the county

Sub

Programme

Key outcome Baseline Key performance indicators Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total Budget

(Ksh.)

Fire Safety Enhanced and

efficient

reponse to fire

disasters in the

county

0

County fire safety and

prevention policy formulated
0 1 0 0 0

2,000,000

0

No.of fire stations constructed

and equiped
1 1 1 1 0

15,000,000

0
No.of fire drills and trainings

conducted
0 5 5 5 5

4,000,000

0
No.of fire safety public

awareness fora conducted
0 20 20 20


20
15,000,000

Floods

Management

Enhanced and

efficient

reponse to

floods disasters

in the county

0

No. Floods risk assessments

conducted
0 4 4 4


4
4,000,000

0 No.of floods vulnerability

sensitization compaigns

conducted.

0 4 4 4

4

4,000,000


137


Programme Name: County Leadership And Governance

Objective: To provide guidance in the execution of county functions

Outcome: Improved county policy formulation, directions and decision making for efficient and effective service delivery

Sub Programme Key outcome Baseline

Key performance

indicators

Planned Targets

Total Budget (Ksh.) Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Management of

executive Affairs

Improved

implementation of

county executive

decisions

20%

% Implentation of

county executive

decisions

100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

5,000,000

35%

% Approval of all

policies, reports and

bills

80% 85% 90% 95% 100%

5,000,000

Public Relations

and

communications

Improved

communication

and coordination

of executive

affairs

20% % Of people

sensitized on county

programmes and

activities

60% 70% 80% 90% 95% 8,000,000

Intergovernmental

and relations

Improved

relationship

between county

government,

national

government and

other entities

50%

% Attendace of

intergovenmental

fora

80% 80% 80% 80% 80%

5,000,000

2

No.of MOU and

agreements signed

and implemented

5 5 5 5 5

10,000,000

Strategic

leadership and

efficiency

monitoring

Efficient

implementation of

county

programmes

30% % Level of

effciency in the

implementation of

county programmes

70% 80% 85% 90% 95% 15,000,000

686262


138


Programme Name:Human Resource Management

Objective: : To Transform Quality and Efficiency of Public Service Delivery

Outcome::Efficient Public Service delivery by competent employees and streamlined Management System

Sub Programme Key outcome Baseline Key performance

indicators Planned Targets
Total Budget (Ksh.)

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Recruitment and

placement

Optimal staffing

levels in the

County

0 Approved staff

establishment

1 1 1 1 1 7,000,000

0 % of skills and jobs

matching 60% 70% 80% 80% 90% 15,000,000

Employee welfare Improved

employee

motivation

0 % Increase in staff

satisfaction

50% 70% 80% 90% 100% 20,000,000

30% % rate of employee

attrition

30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 3,000,000

Staff

Development

Improved staff

technical

competency

0 % Increase in

employee

competency

60% 70% 80% 80% 90% 26,000,000

0 % Increase in

employee

productivity 60% 70% 80% 80% 90% 21,500,000

0 % Increase in

employee efficiency

60% 70% 80% 80% 90% 26,000,000

Disciplinary

management

Improved

employee behavior

0 % Reduction in

disciplinary cases

20% 20% 20% 20% 10% 3,500,000

0 % Compliance to

disciplinary

guidelines

60% 70% 80% 80% 90% 2,500,000

Staff Performance

Management

Improved

accountability and

staff performance

50% % Employee under

performance

contracts

100

%

100% 100

%

100% 100% 5,000,000


139


50% % performance staff

appraisals undertaken

100

%

100% 100

%

100% 100% 5,000,000


140

4.2.7 Social Protection, Culture and Recreation


Sector Composition: Gender & Social Services, Youth Affairs, Sports and Culture.


Vision: Socio-economically empowered residents of Lamu County.


Mission: To provide social support, skills and talents development and promote culture and

heritage.


Sector/ subsector Goals

1. Gender mainstreaming.
2. Socio-economic empowerment of women, youth, PWDs, marginalized and vulnerable

groups.

3. Elimination of discrimination and Gender Based Violence and awareness creation
among the local community to change perception against a girl child education

4. Nurturing and development of talents.
5. Promotion and conservation of culture and heritage.
6. Promotion of social cohesion and integration among the residents of Lamu County.


Sector/subsector Development needs

1. Social cohesion and integration of Lamu people.
2. Uplifting of the standard of living.
3. Leisure and recreation.
4. Preservation of culture and conservation of heritage.
5. Staff development.


Priorities and Strategies

1. Promotion of social cohesion and integration and infrastructure development through
construction of standard stadia, social halls and talent centres.

2. Socio-economic empowerment for Lamu people through training, issuance of grants
etc.

3. Conservation and promotion of culture and heritage through improvement of heritage
sites, setting up of cultural and arts centres and observation of all international,

national and local cultural events.

4. Staff development through hiring of qualified personnel and in service training and
promotions


141


Sector: Social Protection, Culture and Recreation

Programme Name: General Administration, Planning and Supporting Services

Objective: To facilitate general administrative functions of the sector

Outcome: Improved service delivery

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year 5 Total Budget

Planning

and

operations

Improved efficiency in

service delivery

50% 4. Percentage
increase in

efficiency in

operations.


60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 69.7M

80% 2.Increased

coordination among

the staff

90% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Human

Capital

Improved staff

productivity and

efficiency

80% 1.Percentage increase

in competency

90% 100% 100% 100% 100% 69.7M

60% 2. Percentage increase

in efficiency,

effectiveness and

satisfaction.

70% 70% 90% 90% 100%


142


Sub-Sector 1: Gender & Social Services

Programme Name 1: Gender Development

Objective: To empower both gender (men and women) in Lamu County

Outcome: Socio-economic development of men, women, PWD’s and VMG’s in Lamu County enhanced

Men and women

of Lamu County

socially

empowered

30% 1.Increased rate of social inclusion of men and

women in Lamu County


35% 40% 45% 60% 75% 8M

60% 2.Decrease in the rate of discrimination and Gender

based Violence in Lamu County

55% 45% 35% 20% 10%

Programme Name 2: Social Services

Objective: To empower men, women, PWD’s and VMG’s in Lamu County

Outcome: Socio-economic development of men, women, PWD’s and VMG’s in Lamu County enhanced

Social

Infrastructure

and

Amenities

Enhanced

Social capital

10% 1.Proportion of residents benefiting from social

infrastructure and amenities.


15% 20% 30% 40% 50% 80M

30% 2.Percentage of cohesion and integration in Lamu

County

40% 50% 60% 70% 70%

Social

services

empowerment

programmes

Lamu County

residents

socially

empowered

30% 1.Rate of cohesion and integration among the

residents of Lamu County.

40% 50% 60% 70% 70% 124M

0% 2.Rate of women and persons with disabilities

economically empowered through grants and other

social support

5% 10% 20% 25% 30%


143


Sub-sector 2: Youth Affairs

Programme Name: Youth Affairs

Objective: To empower youth in Lamu County

Outcome: Socio-economic development among the youth in Lamu County enhanced

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance Indicators Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year

3

Year 4 Year

5

Total

Budget

Social

infrastructure and

amenities

Social capital of

the youth of Lamu

community

enhanced

0% Percentage of youth benefiting

from social infrastructure and

amenities.

3% 6% 9% 12% 15% 60.5M

100 Number of youth rehabilitated and

integrated back to the society

100 200 300 400 500

Socio-economic

empowerment

(Countywide)

Youth are socially

and economically

empowered

1,000 No of youth socially and

economically empowered

1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 3,500 111M

Sub-Sector 3: Sports

Programme Name: Sports development

Objective: To identify, nurture and promote sports talents in Lamu County

Outcome: Improved economic status of youth in Lamu County

Sports

Infrastructure

Sports

infrastructure of

Lamu community

enhanced

20,000 No of residents using the sports

infrastructure

30,000 40,000 48,000 60,000 60,000 495M

40% Increased rate of people taking

up sports for recreation and

leisure

50% 60% 65% 75% 80%

Talent

development and

Sports talents

developed and

10,000 Number of people whose talents

are developed and promoted.

11,000 13,000 16,000 20,000 20,000 108M


144


promotion promoted 30% Percentage of people utilizing

sports talents

40% 50% 60% 70% 80%


Sub-Sector 4: Culture

Programme Name: Culture and Heritage Development

Objective: To identify and promote culture, arts and talents for economic empowerment

Outcome: Lamu people economically empowered through arts and culture.

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year

1

Year

2

Year

3

Year

4

Year

5

Total

Budget

Infrastructural

development

Improved protection and

conservation of heritage and

preservation of culture of Lamu

County

40% 1.Percentage of

culture preserved and

heritage conserved

50% 55% 60% 65% 70% 140M


Culture and arts

promotion

Improved branding and promotion

of culture

30% Percentage of cultural

practices branded and

promoted

40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 85M

30% Percentage of people

whose cultural talents

have been enhanced

and utilized.

40% 50% 60% 70% 80%


145


Table 12: Cross-sectoral impacts

Programme

Name

Sector Cross- Sector Impact Measures to Harness or Mitigate the

Impact

Synergies Adverse Impact

Gender &

Social

Services

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation

• Construction of social halls will create

employment for women and youth as

well as enhancing social cohesion.

• Socio-economic empowerment through

issuance of grants will improve income

levels among women, PWDs and VMGs.

• Construction f social halls will

likely impact negatively on

environment. It may also create

land ownership conflicts.

• Socio-economic empowerment

through issuance of grants may

lead to dependency syndrome.

• Equipping social halls with furniture

and ICT facilities and employing

staff. Full compliance with NEMA

regulation, acquisition of proper legal

documents and development of

proper conflicts resolution

mechanisms.

• Training the community on

entrepreneurship skills. This will

enable them develop a saving culture.

Youth

Affairs

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

• Construction of youth resource and

rehabilitation centres will create

employment for youth as well as

enhancing social cohesion. The

rehabilitation centre will help in fight

against drug and substance abuse.

• Socio-economic empowerment through

issuance of grants will improve income

levels among youth in Lamu County.

• Construction of youth resource

and rehabilitation centres will

likely impact negatively on

environment. It may also create

land ownership conflicts.

• Socio-economic empowerment

through issuance of grants may

lead to dependency syndrome.

• Equipping youth resource and

rehabilitation centres with furniture

and ICT facilities and employing

staff. Full compliance with NEMA

regulation, acquisition of proper legal

documents and development of

proper conflicts resolution

mechanisms.

• Equipping youth with

entrepreneurship skills. This will

enable them develop a saving culture.


146


Programme

Name

Sector Cross- Sector Impact Measures to Harness or Mitigate the

Impact

Synergies Adverse Impact

Sports

development

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

• Construction of International Standard

Stadia will help in proper skills

development, employment creation,

providing entertainment to the

community and enhancement of social

cohesion.

• Identifying, nurturing and promoting

sports talents will be a source of income

to the youth, keep them off drugs and

other vices as well as develop them into

national and international athletes.

Introduction of new sports will diversify

the number of sports disciplines

available.

• Construction of International

Standard Stadia will likely impact

negatively on environment. It will

also create land ownership

conflicts.

• Some of the sports disciplines can

be culturally unacceptable.

• Full compliance with NEMA

regulation, acquisition of proper legal

documents and development of

proper conflicts resolution

mechanisms.

• Support many tournaments and

leagues in different sporting

disciplines. Ensure dress codes and

ethics are properly observed.

Culture and

heritage

development

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

• The Cultural and Arts Promotion centre

will promote diverse culture and talent

development. Identification and signage

of cultural, heritage sites and monuments

will attract tourists thus creating

employment opportunities.

• Talents identification and promotion as

well as cultural conservation will help in

promoting tourism, creating employment

and developing talents among Lamu

communities.

• Construction of Cultural and Arts

Promotion Centres will have a

negative on environment while

signage and securing of

monuments may create conflicts

on land ownership.

• Diversification of culture may

create conflict with the local

culture.

• Full compliance with NEMA

regulation, acquisition of proper legal

documents and development of

proper conflicts resolution

mechanisms.

• Support many talent shows in

different arts. Ensure dress codes and

ethics are properly observed.


147

4.2.8 Sanitation, Environmental Protection, Water And Natural Resources

Sector Composition:

The sector comprises of the following subsectors;

• Water

• Sanitation

• Environment management and protection

• Natural Resources.


Vision

A county with a clean, safe and healthy environment for all


Mission

To effectively manage the environment, natural resources, water, solid and liquid waste for

sustainable development in order to ensure a healthy and safe environment for all in Lamu

County.


Sector Goal

The overall goal of the Sector is to ensure sustainable development in a clean healthy and

safe environment.


Sector Needs, Priorities and Strategies

The massive proposed development projects in the County exerts pressure on the County

resources and threatens their sustainability if deliberate effort are not put to preserve. Ore

land is required for increased human settlements, industries and agriculture. If these

developments are not checked, deforestation and degradation of the land will be experienced.

Increased needs for water supply to match the population and industrial growth needs proper

planning and investment. The growth of towns poses a challenge in waste management and

disposal.

For efficient service delivery and sustainable utilization of the natural resources the County

prioritizes to ensure the following;


• Enough supply of water across the County

• Efficient collection and disposal of waste in Lamu townships

• Sustainable utilization of the resources through regulations
and monitoring

• Protection and conservation of the natural environment


To ensure the above priorities the County Government will strengthen the County structures

and capacity and work in partnership with other stakeholders of the sector. The section below

outlines the sector and subsector programmes and targets for the next five years.


148

Sub-Sector: Water

Programme Name 1: General Administration & Support Services

Objective: To enhance and improve service delivery

Outcome: Improved service delivery.

Sub

Program

me

Key Outcome Baseli

ne


Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost KSH

General

Administ

ration &

Support

Services

Increased work

efficiency

0 % of work

performance

improved

0 0 20% 4m 20% 4m 20% 4m 0 0 12,000,000

0 % of work

performance

improved

0 0 2 0.6m 2 0.6

m

0 0 0 0 1,200,000

0 % of work

performance

improved

0 0 1 5m 0 0 0 0 0 0 5,000,000

2 No.

of

staffs

% of work

performance

improved

3 2m 3 2m 0 0 0 0 0 0 4,000,000

Enhance staff

capacity

0 No. of staff trained 2 2m 3 3m 3 3m 0 0 0 0 8,000,000

Improved

efficiency

0 No. of Computers

procured

2 0.2m 1 0.1m 1 0.1

m

0 0 0 0 400,000

Improved

efficiency

0 No. of Laptops

procured

2 0.3m 1 0.1m 1 0.1

m

0 0 0 0 500,000

Improved

efficiency

0 No. of printers

procured

2 0.2m 1 0.1m 2 0.2

m

0 0 0 0 500,000

Conducive

working

environment

0 No. of offices

furnished.

2 0.5m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 500,000

Sub-Total 32,100,000


149


Programme Name 2: Water sources protection, Conservation and Management

Objective: To protect water Aquifers

Outcome: Increase water quantity in Aquifers

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key

performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost

Increased

water quantity

in Aquifers

6,000 m3 Water availability

sustained

0 0 15% 15M 25% 25M 30% 30M 30% 30M 100,000,000

Water

availability is

assured

25% Water availability

sustained

0% 0 2% 1M 4% 2M 3% 1.5M 1% 0.5M 5,000,000

Sub-Total 105,000,000


150


Programme Name 3: Water Supply

Objective: To improve Water Distribution

Outcome: Increased access to water & reduced incidences of water borne Diseases

Sub

Programme

Key

Outcome

Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost


Distribution

line


Increased

access to

potable

water

120

Km

Pipelines

% of people

accessing potable

water.

0 4% 16M 4% 16M 4% 16M 3% 12.M 60,900,000

Fetching

water

Availability

of water

increased

30 No.

Boreholes

No of people

accessing potable

water.

2000 10M 1000 5M 800 4M 200 2M 0 0 20,000,000

Availability

of water

increased

30 No.

Boreholes

No of people

accessing potable

water

0 0 800 2.4M 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,400,000


151


Programme Name 3: Water Supply

Objective: To improve Water Distribution

Outcome: Increased access to water & reduced incidences of water borne Diseases

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost

Increased

access to

potable

water.

1000No.

shallow

wells.

No. of people

served with

potable

water.(Commun

ity)

0 0 1200 3M 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,000,000


Increased

access to

potable

water

1000 No. of

shallow

wells

No. of people

served with

potable

water.(Commun

ity)

0 0 1200 3.6M 1000 3M 1000 3M 0 0 9,600,000

Increased

access to

potable

water.

1000

No. of

shallow

wells

No. of people

accessing

potable water.

(Commercial)

0 0 1000 20M 600 9M 400 6M 0 0 35,000,00

0

Water

desalinatio

n

Availability

of potable

water

5No.

desalination

plants

No. of water

Desalination

Plants installed.

0 0 1440 60M 1440 60M 720 30M 720 30M 180,000,0

00


152


Programme Name 3: Water Supply

Objective: To improve Water Distribution

Outcome: Increased access to water & reduced incidences of water borne Diseases

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost

Rain water

harvesting

Enhanced

storage

capacity

10Nowater

pans

No. of livestock

served

0 0 2500 6m 2500 6M 0 0 0 0 12,000,00

0

Enhanced

storage

capacity

10 No. of

water pans

No. of livestock

served

0 0 2500 2M 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,000,000

Enhanced

storage

capacity

400 No.

Djabias

No. of people

served

0 0 8000 16M 4000 8M 4000 8M 0 0 32,000,00

0

Enhanced

storage

capacity

400 No. of people

served

0 0 8000 4M 4000 2M 4000 2M 0 0 8,000,000

Enhanced

storage

capacity

150 No.

plastic tanks

No. of people

served

0 0 800 1.6M 400 0.8M 400 0.8M 0 0 3,200,000

Water

Kiosk

Reduced

distances to

water points

50 water

kiosk (5m3)

No. of people

served

0 0 300 1.8M 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,800,000


153


Programme Name 3: Water Supply

Objective: To improve Water Distribution

Outcome: Increased access to water & reduced incidences of water borne Diseases

Sub

Programme

Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Budget
Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost Target Cost

Enhanced

storage

capacity

13 of steel

elevated

tank

No. of

Construction of

elevated tank &

underground

tank.

0 0 1000 7M 0 0 0 0 0 0 7,000,000

Reticulatio

n system

Increased

access to

potable

water

0 3500 No. of

metered water

connections

3500 100M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100,000,000

Water

source

Increased

water

production

0 More water source
surveyed

80% 8m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8,000,000


Sub-total 484,900,000

GRAND TOTAL 622,000,000


154


Environment, sanitation and Natural Resources

Programme Name: General Administration

Objective: Improve efficiency and quality of services

Outcome: Improved Customer satisfaction

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key

performance

Indicators

Planned Targets
Total Budget

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Human

Resources

Management and

Development

Efficient and

competent workforce

% of staff

performances

(SPAs)

80 85 90 95 100 64,800,000

Operations Increased services

coverage

20 % of Service

coverage

30 40 50 60 70 65,200,000

Planning,

monitoring and

Evaluation

Efficient and quality

services

% of the

departmental

performance (PC)

80 85 90 95 100 16,000,000

Leadership and

Governance

Improved service

delivery

% of satisfied

customers

50 55 60 65 70 10,000,000


155


Sub-Sector: Sanitation

The programmes aligned to the sub-sector include waste-water and sewerage management, solid waste management, hygiene and sanitation and

vector and vermin control.


Programme Name: Waste Management and Sanitation

Objective: Ensure clean and safe environment

Outcome: Reduced Incidences of Communicable Diseases
Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Waste Water and

Sewerage

Management

Reduced Incidences of

Communicable

Diseases

14560 % reduction of

diarrheal cases 5 5 5 5 5

2,001,000,000

57 % of households

with improved

sanitation

60 65 70 75 80

Solid waste

management

Reduced Incidences of

Communicable

Diseases

14560 % reduction of

diarrheal cases 5 5 5 5 5

186,000,000

2614 % reduction of eye

infections 5 5 5 5 5

Increased coverage for

solid waste

management

0 % of towns with

appropriate waste

disposal system 10

10 10 10 10

Hygiene and

Sanitation

Reduced Incidences of

Communicable

Diseases

57 % of households

with improved

sanitation

60 65 70 75 80 17,000,000


30

% increase of

households with

hand washing

facilities 5 5 5 5 5

14560 % reduction of

diarrheal cases 5 5 5 5 5

4460 % reduction of

intestinal worms

cases reported 5 5 5 5 5


156


Programme Name: Waste Management and Sanitation

Objective: Ensure clean and safe environment

Outcome: Reduced Incidences of Communicable Diseases
Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Vector and vermin

control

Reduced incidences of

vector borne diseases

1431 % reduction of

malaria cases 5 5 5 5 5

25,500,000

1170 % reduction of

Bilharzia cases 5 5 5 5 5

Reduced prevalence of

vector and vermin

infestation

% reduction of

population infested

with jiggers 5 5 5 5 5


% reduction of

households infested
with bedbugs 5 5 5 5 5


157


Sub-Sector: Environment

The programmes aligned to the sub-sector include Noise & Air pollution control and Sea water and Ground water and other surface water

pollution control.


Programme Name: Pollution Control and Regulation

Objective: Ensure clean, quiet and safe environment

Outcome: Reduced incidences of air and water pollution related diseases/conditions

Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Noise and Air

pollution control

and regulation

Reduced incidences of

upper respiratory

diseases

46083 % reduction of cases

of upper respiratory

diseases reported

5 5 5 5 5 11,250,000

3135 % reduction of cases

of ear diseases

reported

5 5 5 5 5

Improved

performance of the

pollution monitoring

and control unit

% of the industries

complying to

pollution standards

50 55 60 65 70

Sea water and

Ground water and

other surface water

pollution control

Reduced incidence of

waterborne diseases

14560 % reduction of

diarrheal cases

5 5 5 5 5 1,500,000

Improved

performance of the

pollution monitoring

and control unit

30 Proportion of water

bodies with good

ambient water

quality (%)

40 45 50 55 60


158


Sub-Sector: Natural Resources

The sub-sector covers management of natural resources, including sand and stone resources, forest and wild life.


Programme Name: Natural resources conservation and management

Objective: Ensure sustainable management of natural resources

Outcome: Sustained Natural Resources
Sub Programme Key Outcome Baseline Key performance

Indicators

Planned Targets

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total Budget

Management of

sand and stone

resources

Sustainable management of

sand and stone resources

0 % of acreage of sand

and stone quarries

rehabilitated

5 5 5 5 5 27,500,000

Forest Management Sustainable management of

forest resources
33.9 % of forest cover 34.5 35 35 35.5 36 38,500,000

Wildlife

management

Sustainable management of

wildlife resources
% reduction of

injuries to human by

wild animals

10 10 10 10 10 23,500,000


159


Cross Sectoral implementation Considerations


Table 12 Cross –sectoral impacts


Programme Name Sector Cross-sector Impact Measures to Harness or Mitigate the Impact

Synergies Adverse impact

Water sources

protection,

Conservation

&Management

Environmental

protection, water

and natural

resources

Disease prevention and

promotion of good health

Land degradation.

Interference with socio

economic of the local

communities

Advisory on sustainable use of natural

resources/Public awareness/provision of water

supply


Water supply Environmental

protection, water

and natural

resources

Increase water access to

communities. Disease

prevention and promotion

of good health

Land degradation.

Interference with socio

economic of the local

communities


Advisory on sustainable use of natural

resources/Public awareness/provision of water

supply


Waste management

and sanitation

Environmental

protection, water

and natural

resources

Disease prevention and

promotion of good health

Land degradation

Exposes domestic

animal/human to

diseases and injuries

Fencing of the dump sites and license the

disposal sites by NEMA


Pollution control Environmental

protection, water

and natural

resources

Disease prevention and

promotion of good health

It limits business and

employment

opportunities

Provide advisory on safe limits

Negotiated compliance


Natural resource

conservation/manage

ment

Environmental

protection, water

and natural

resources

Improved

fisheries

agriculture/livestock

production and eco –

tourism

Interfere with socio

economic of the local

community

Advisory on sustainable use of natural

resources/Public awareness


160


4.3 Flagship /County Transformative Projects

These are projects with high impact in terms of employment creation, increasing county competitiveness, revenue generation etc. They may be

derived from the Kenya Vision 2030 (to be implemented in collaboration with the National Government) or from the County Transformative

Agenda. Projects cutting across county borders (cross-county and country projects) should be clearly indicated in this section.

4.3.1 Agriculture Sector


Project

Name

Location Objective Output

/Outcome

Performance indicators Timeframe Implementing

Agencies

Cost (Ksh.)

Fruit

processing

factory plant

Hongwe/

Mpeketoni

To add value to

farm produce and

reduce post-harvest

losses

Prolong

produce shelf-

life and farm

incomes

Number of operational

processing plant


Number of farmers

supplying fruits to the

processing plant

2018 –

2020

Department of

Agriculture

100,000,000

Establishment

of cotton

ginnery

Mpeketoni To add value to seed

cotton produced

from the county

Increased

production of

lint and cotton

seeds

Number of operational

ginnery plant


Number of farmers

supplying seed cotton to

the ginnery

2018 –

2020

Department of

Agriculture

100,000,000

Mega

Irrigation

Project

Witu Enhance large-scale

production of crops

Steady supply

of crop produce

Number of acres put

under irrigation


Number of farmers

involved in irrigation

projects

2018 –

2022

Department of

Agriculture

100,000,000


161


4.3.2 Livestock production Sub-sector

Project

Name

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

County

Livestock

Feed

Strategic

Reserve -

Witu

Livestock

Farm

To build County

livestock feed

reserves for

drought

emergency

interventions.

Establish

1 county

livestock

feed

researve

Construction of 3 Haybans at

Mkunumbi, Chalaluma and

Didewaride.

Purchase of 1 tractor, trailer, hay

baler, Pelletizers, Mixer and Millers,

Grass cutter. Establish 300 ha of

pasture and fodder, Harvesting and

conservation of hay bales

140M LCG,

RPLRP,N

DMA,FAO

, KCSAP,

2018 - 2022 Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


4.3.3 Veterinary Sub-sector

Project

Name


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Promotion

and

establishme

nt of

livestock

export

zone*

Establishment of

disease free

compartment for

processing

livestock export

1 Conduct feasibility studies and

reconnaissance survey and prepare a

business plan to actualize this

aspiration.

20M PPP 1 – 5 years Department of

Veterinary

*Land has already been identified at Bargoni Budhei area


162


4.3.4 Land sub-sector

Project Name Location Objective Output /Outcome Performance

indicators

Timefram Implementing

Agencies

Cost (Ksh.)

1.Land mapping

,Regularization,

& tittling

Countywide To enhance

tenure security

Enabled business

environment

25,000 title deeds

issued

2018/2019-

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Land

500,000,000

2.Development

of Integrated

Strategic Urban

Development

Plan

Mokowe,

Amu, Hindi,

Mpeketoni,

Witu, Faza,

Kiunga,

Kizingitini

To Create

sustainable

settlements

Enhanced service

provision

8 planned urban

areas

FY

2018/2019

CGL

Ministry of

Transport

240,000,000

3.Integrated

County housing

scheme

Countywide To facilitate

production of

decent and

affordable

housing to

County

Increased revenue

collection

1000Units FY

2018/2019-

FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND

625,000,000


163


4.3.5 Fisheries sub-sector

Project Name


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implemen

ting

Agency

Establishment

of fish

processing

plant/factory

Increase the value

of fish and fish

product

1 The works will involve

construction and completion of a

building to the standards provided

for in the Natioanl standards on

Fish processing establishment. It

will accommodate several

production lines as per the

identified species of interest.

200,000,000 PPP 1- 5 years Departmen

t of

Fisheries


4.3.6 Infrastructure

Project Name Location Objective Output /Outcome Performan

ce

indicators

Timefram

e

(Start-

End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

1.Public sea

transport

Lamu, Mokowe,

Mtangawanda,

Ndau,Mkokoni

Open public sea

transport

Safe and reliable passage of

goods and passengers

Operational

modern boats

& ferries

2018-2022 CGL

KMA


200M


2.Shella -

kipungani ring

road via langoni,

mkomani wiyoni

and matondoni

3.Rehabilitation

of storm water

drainage system

Lamu Island


Lamu Old Town

Ease access and

connectivity in the

island


Enhance the life

span of drainage

system and

pavements

Enhanced connectivity and

Improved trade


Clean and safe storm system

30km of

paved road


2018-2022

2018-2022 CGL

KUSP

200M


164


and pavements

4.3.7 Trade

Project Name Location Objective Output /Outcome Performance

indicators

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Industrial park Hindi ward promote competitive
trade and investment

in the county

Increased investors in the

county
Percentage increased

in industries set-up


Percentage increased

in new investors

2019-2022 County
Government of

Lamu

1 billion


4.3.8 Tourism

Project

Name

Location Objective Output /Outcome Performance

indicators

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Tourism

festivals and

events

County wide Increasing

awareness of the

tourism products

Increasing number of

tourist arrivals

-Percentage increase

in visitor arrivals

- Number of

festivals and events

organized

2018-2022 County

Government

of Lamu

130M

Destination

Branding

County Wide To increase the

number of tourist

arrivals resulting

in thriving

tourism industry

in Lamu

Increased Knowledge

about the Lamu

Niche products

Percentage increase

in visitor arrivals

2018-2022 County

Government

of Lamu

50M

Halal

Tourism

promotion

Lamu

Archipelago

Promote and

explore the

untapped

potential

Increasing

competitiveness of

the destination as

well as Tourist

Number of visitor

arrivals from the

middle east market

2018-2022 County

Government

of Lamu

100M


165


numbers


166


4.3.9 Health

Project

Name

Location Objective Output

/Outcome

Performance indicators Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementi

ng Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Upgrading

Witu H/C to

Level 4

Hospital

Witu ward To increase

provision of

health services

Access to

quality health

services

Reduction of cases referred

to other hospitals

Accredited Diagnostic

services (Lab & Radiology)

2018-19 CGL 30M

Transforming

Lamu County

Hospital as a

teaching and

referral

Hospital

Mkomani To offer

comprehensive

quality services

Acces to

quality health

services

Reduction in number of

patients refferd outside the

county .

Recruited specialists in all

faculities

Accredited Diagnostic

services(Lab & Radiology)

2018-22 CGL

MOH

Development

partners

200M

Construction

of staff

quarters to all

primary

health

facilities

All wards To ensure health

workers

providing

emergency

services live

closer to health

facilities

clients access

emergency

services24hrs

Availability of staff houses

in all primary health facilities

2018-22 CGL

National govt

Development

partners


100M

Upgrading of

Hindi

Magogoni

,Kizingitini

and

Muhamarani

Dispensaries

Hindi ,Faza &

Mkunumbi

wards

To increase

access to

comprehensive

quality primary

health services

Acces to

comprehensi

ve quality

primary

health

services

Infrastructure , equipment

and staffing meet KEPH

norms for level 3 facilities

2018-20 CGL 150M


167


Project

Name

Location Objective Output

/Outcome

Performance indicators Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementi

ng Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

to Level 3

facilities

Digitalization

of level 3 and

4 facilities

Mkomani,Bahari

,Faza &

Witu,Hindi,Kiun

ga ,Mkunumbi

To improve

quality of health

information for

planning and

clinical decision

making

Improved

clinical

outcomes

and effective

planning

Availability of both

hardwares and software

2018-20 CGL 200M

80% of Lamu

residents

enrolled in

NHIF

All wards To increase

sustainable

health financing

Reduce out

of pocket

expenditure

on health

Increased

funding for

the health

sector

>80% of Lamu residents

enrolled into NHIF data base

2018-22 National

Govt

CGL

Devpt

partners

NHIF


168


4.3.10 Sanitation, Environmental Protection, Water and Natural Resources


Project

name

Location Objective Output/

Outcome

Performance

indicators

Time frame

(Start-

End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh)

Constructi

on of

sewerage

system

Amu and

Mokowe

To provide access to

improved sanitation

services

Improved sanitation

services

No. of sewerage

system established

2021 &

2023

CGL 2Billion

Lamu –

Garseni

water

supply

Garseni/

Lamu

To supply potable

water to Lamu County

including LAPSSET

area.

Potable water

supplied

Feasibility study,

damming, Treatment

work, storage,

distribution and

reticulation system

done.

2-5 CGL, NG, CWSB
& other

development

partner.

22

Billion

Feasibility

Studies

Garseni

and

Mangai

To survey and Confirm

the potential of

aquifer/source.

Feasibility studies

carried out

Two number of

feasibility studies

carried out.

1-2 CGL 8M

Desalinati

on Plant

for Lamu

port

Hindi


Supply potable water Potable water

supplied

Desalination plant

installed

1-3 CWSB 650M

Reticulati

on system

Faza Increase access to

water

Potable water

distributed

Reticulation system

connected

1-2 CGL 100M


169


4.3.11 Education

Project

Name

Location Objective Output/Outcome Performance

Indicators

Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Lamu

County

Education

al

Resource

Centre

Countywi

de

To establish a center of

academic excellence

that will equip Lamu

people with technical

skills and human

capital needed to tap

opportunities in the

upcoming mega

projects

Lamu County

Resource Centre

established and

skilled human

resource developed.

1. Established Lamu

County Resource

Centre.

2. Number of people

enrolled, retained

and graduating from

the Resource Centre.

2018-2022 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

497M


4.3.12 Gender, Youth Affairs and Social Services

Project

Name

Location Objective Output/Outcome Performance

Indicators

Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Lamu

County

Social

Developm

ent Fund

Countywi

de

To spur socio-

economic development

of women, youth and

persons with

disabilities in Lamu

County

Women, youth and

persons with

disabilities getting

funds and

becoming socio-

economically

empowered

Number of women,

youth and persons

with disabilities

getting funds and

becoming socio-

economically

empowered

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

150M

One

person one

skill

Countywi

de

To facilitate trainings

that aim at empowering

Lamu people inside and

People of Lamu

County get trained

on various skills

Number of people

trained on various

skills

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

78M


170


outside our county based on their needs. 2. Donors


4.3.13 Sports

Project

Name

Location Objective Output/Outcome Performance

Indicators

Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Lamu

County

Sports

Complex


Countywi

de

1.To construct a Lamu

County Sports

Complex hosting

different Sports

Disciplines

Lamu County

Sports Stadium

constructed.

Lamu County Sports

Stadium in place.

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

3.GoK

490M


4.5.14 Culture

Project

Name

Location Objective Output/Outcome Performance

Indicators

Timeframe

(Start-End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Lamu

Cultural

and Arts

Promotion

Centre

Lamu

East and

Lamu

West

To construct one

cultural promotion

centre per sub county

that aim to showcase

the culture of Lamu,

identify cultural and

arts’ talents, promote

them and market them.

Arts and cultural

promotion centres

constructed,

equipped and

cultural and arts’

talents identified,

promoted and

marketed.

Number of arts and

cultural promotion

centres constructed

and equipped

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

3.GoK

109M


188


CHAPTER 5: IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK


5.1 Introduction


This chapter outlines the institutional framework and organizational structure that will be

followed in implementing the CIDP II. It outlines the stakeholders, and the roles of the

various institutions in the County. The organizational structure for the county that spells out

responsibilities as well as various levels of authority in the two arms of county government is

provided in Figure 1 below


5.2 Ward Development Projects Initiative


The County Government of Lamu will allocate KShs. 30 Million per year each of the 10

wards during the CIDP II implementation period (2018 - 2022). This amount is an integral

part of allocations to the various County departments. The specific projects are to be

determined through participatory budgeting process every year.

5.3 Institutional Framework

The structure of the County Government of Lamu is institutionalized into four broad areas:

a) The County Government Executive
b) The County Assembly
c) The County Public Service Board
d) The County Treasury.


The Executive arm of the County Governmentis headed by the Governor (including his

Deputy), the County Executive Committee and the County Secretary. These constitute the top

leadership of the county that provides the overall vision and strategic direction for the

government. The development goals for the county are also set at this level. The specific

roles of officers holding positions at the Executive in implementation of this plan are as

follows;


Office of the Governor:

• Providing leadership in the management of the affairs of the county;

• Providing policy direction in the County Government and ensuring proper governance
structures are in place;

• Ensuring implementation of county and other national legislation, as may be required;

• Overseeing the decentralization of services to the extent possible;

• Promoting democratic and accountable exercise of[power;

• Ensuring participation of the people in decision-making; and

• Mainstreaming the interests and rights of the people.

• Ensuring this plan is implemented.
The Deputy Governor shall deputize the Governor and represent him when and wherever

necessary.


County Executive Committee Members:

Article 179 (3) (b), of the Constitution, provides for the number of Executive Committee

members in the County Government of Lamu to be six. The technical functions of the county

have been organized into these six Departments. Each of the Department has specific

mandates to deliver services to the people of Lamu. A County Executive Committee Member


189


is the head of each department and provides policy direction. A Chief Officer in the

department serves as the accounting officer.


The specific duties for the Executive Committee Members include:

• Implementing county legislation;

• Implementing within the county, national legislation to the extent that the legislation
so requires;

• Managing and coordinating the functions of the county administration and its
departments; and

• Performing any other functions conferred to it by the Constitution or national
legislation;

• Preparing legislation for consideration by the County Assembly;

• Providing regular reports to the County Assembly for deliberation and decision
making;

• and Preparing County budgets and plans.


The County Assembly

Together with the Executive, the County Assembly are at the apex of the organizational

hierarchy of the county government. As provided for in the Constitution, the County

Assembly holds legislative authority and comprises of members elected by registered voters

at the wards; special seat members; members of marginalized groups including persons with

disabilities and the youth. The membership also includes the Speaker who is an ex-officio

member elected by the County Assembly itself.


The functions of the County Assembly include:


• Enacting county laws

• Supervises over all the affairs of the county including receiving and approving the
development plans and policies of the county.

• It also oversees the development and management of the county infrastructure and
institutions; and

• Is responsible for approval of the county budgets and expenditures.


Another important structure in the county‘s organizational hierarchy is the County Public

Service Board, which is established under an Act of Parliament as provided for under Article

235(1) of the Constitution of Kenya, 2010. The Article provides for a County Public Service

Board in each county with control over the County Public Service. The board ensures that the

county has adequate and competent personnel to propagate the development addenda for the

county. One of mandates of the board is to establish and if necessary abolish offices in the

County Public service. The board appoints and confirms persons to hold or act in offices; it

exercises disciplinary control over persons holding or acting in those offices. The board shall

promote the county’s core values, integrity and inclusiveness-approach to service delivery

through the recruitment of best people and the conduct of continuous capacity building in the

county public service.

Section 105 of the PFM Act, Establishments a County Treasury for each county government.

It spells the composition of the County Treasury to comprise of: the County Executive

Committee member for finance; the Chief Officer; and the department or departments of the

County Treasury responsible for financial and fiscal matters. The Act stipulates that The

County Executive Committee member for finance shall be the head of the County Treasury.

The County Treasury is responsible of monitoring, evaluating and oversight of the


190


management of public finances and economic affairs of the county government. It is basically

the arm through which the county mobilizes resources for funding the budgetary

requirements of the county government and putting in place mechanisms to raise revenue and

resources for the successful implementation of this CIDP.


A summary of the County Government Organizational Chart is depicted below:


190


101


5.4 Stakeholders in the County

The place for stakeholders in the implementation of this CIDP is very central in the county’s

development agenda. Lamu County Government intends to adopt a participatory approach of

governance for the next five (5) years. To this effect, a Social economic council bringing

together the Lamu elite and business community as key stakeholders in the development

process of the county has been established. The County has also constituted development

committees at ward, subcounty and county levels to provide a working framework to involve

the local communities and other stakeholders in the identification, prioritization and social

audit of the programmes and projects in this CIDP.


Table 55 below illustrates the role of the various stakeholders ranging form; Citizens,

National Government, the Civil Society, Development Partners, PBOs, FBOs etc.


Table 41: Role of Stakeholders in CIDP Development & Implementation

Stakeholder Role

Citizens o Community participation on policy formulation

County Assembly o Approval of CIDP

o Oversight of CIDP implementation of programmes

and projects

o Passing of relevant bills

o Political goodwill

o Budgetary allocation

National Government


o Provides policy direction, financial resources and

technical support in the various sectors

o Funding

o Capacity building

o Legislation of laws that safeguard the interest of

the County

o Policy direction

o Secondment of qualified personnel

Judiciary o Enforcement of the law

Other County governments o Collaboration on political and social economic

development across counties

NGOs and Civil Society o Support government development efforts and assist

in provision of resources

o Advocacy

Private Sector and Financial

Institutions (e.g. Commercial

Banks, SACCOs MFIs)

o Partner with government to invest and provide

capital to drive development in the sector

o Corporate Social Responsibility


102


Stakeholder Role

Development partners (e.g.

USAID, UKaid, World Vision,

UNDP, UNICEF, GIZ….)

o Liaison in formulation of sector policies

o Support sector development programmes and

projects

o Capacity building

o Create linkages with international donors

Education, Governance and

Research Institutions

o Capacity building

o Conducting research

Government Agencies/ State

Acto

o Mapping of investment opportunities

o Capacity building

o Product development

o Regulation and licensing

o Provision of trade and industrial development

credit


5.5 Resource Requirements by Sector


5.5.1 Financial Resource Requirements

The proposed sectoral budgets that show the financial requirements derived from

transformative projects and specific sector projects are depicted below:


Sector Sub-Sector Program Budget

Estimate Per

Program

Budget Estimate

Per Sector

ARUD Agriculture Sub-Sector P1 309,500,000 6,459,640,000


P2 168,000,000

P3 993,500,000

P4 142,500,000

Fisheries Sub-Sector P1 210,250,000

P2 484,000,000

Livestock P1 506,590,000

P2 1,158,300,000

Lands P1 99,000,000

P2 208,000,000

P3 1,175,000,000

P4 620,000,000

P5 385,000,000

INFRASTRUCTU

RE, ENERGY &

ICT

Infrastructure P1 125,000,000 1,345,000,000


P2 435,000,000

P3 335,000,000

P4 250,000,000


103


Sector Sub-Sector Program Budget

Estimate Per

Program

Budget Estimate

Per Sector

Energy P1 200,000,000

GENERAL

ECONOMIC AND

COMMERCIAL

AFFAIRS

County Treasury P1 100,000,000 854,150,000


P2

P3

P4 130,000,000

Trade Sub-Sector P1 83,000,000

P2 25,500,000

P3 11,000,000

Tourism P1 80,500,000

P2 83,000,000

P3 202,400,000

P4 28,000,000

Co-Operative P1 110,750,000

HEALTH

SECTOR

Health P1 5,976,500,000 7,013,500,000


P2 263,000,000

P3 774,000,000

EDUCATION Education P1 339,300,000 1,804,500,000


P2 207,000,000

P3 623,200,000

P4 635,000,000

PUBLIC

ADMINISTRATI

ON

Public Administration P1 1,058,180,000 1,345,480,000


P2 126,300,000

P3 48,000,000

P4 113,000,000

SOCIAL

PROTECTION,

CULTURE AND

RECREATION

Social Protection, Culture

And Recreation

P1 139,400,000 1,350,900,000


Gender & Social Services P1 212,000,000

P2 171,500,000

P3 603,000,000

P4 225,000,000

SANITATION,

ENVIRONMENT

AL

PROTECTION,

WATER AND

NATURAL

RESOURCES

Water P1 32,100,000 3,109,750,000


P2 105,000,000

P3 484,900,000

Environment, Sanitation And

Natural Resources

P1 156,000,000

P2 2,229,500,000

P3 12,750,000

P4 89,500,000

GRAND TOTAL 23,282,920,000


104


5.4. The Resource Mobilization Framework

The revenue base of the county government consists of internal as well as external sources.

Internal sources of revenue will include-

o Property taxes and rates
o Entertainment taxes
o Licences and permits
o User fees and charges
o Penalties

External sources currently include-

o Transfers from national government in accordance with Article 203 (2)
o Any conditional or unconditional grant from national government
o Grants from development partnersas well as the Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs)

arrangement.


In the quest to meet developmental challenges, the county government of Lamu intends to

mobilize the required financial resources to cope with the rising demand for development

projects and provision of services. Rapid population growth is expected to exert pressure on

the existing infrastructure and other services. At the same time, population growth is an

opportunity for revenue growth and abundance of human resource to power the economy.

The former has led to the need for the county government to develop clear strategies to raise

more revenue. The amount of anticipated revenues is indicated in Table 14.


The Resource Mobilization Framework


Revenue Source 2018/19 2019/20 2020/2021 2021/22 2022/23

Own Source

Revenue (OSR)

70,000,000 73,500,000. 77,175,000 81,033,750 85,085,437

CRA Equalization

Share

3,514,275,145 3,689,988,902 3,874,488,347 4,068,212,764 4,271,623,402

Other sources of

revenue (specify)

292,096,059 306,700,861 322,035,905 338,137,700 355,044,585

Total 4,253,389,424 4,466,058,895 4,689,361,839 4,923,829,93 5,170,021,428


5.4.1 Revenue Raising

The county government intends to mobilize the required financial resources to cope with the

rising demand for development programmes that define the specific projects and the county

transformative projects so as to improve the livelihoods of the people of Lamu. To achieve

the revenue projections, the following internal and external revenue raising strategies will be

pursued.


5.4.1.1 Internal Revenue

The county government will embark on an elaborate financial strategy aimed at creating

sustainable resourcing for implementing the integrated development plan. The county

government will pursue the following revenue raising strategies.

o Enactment & Enforcement of County laws, passing County Finance Bill
o Preparation of county valuation roll


105


o Review of fees and charges. The county will make a comprehensive review of the
existing rates with view to adjusting it to a reasonable but sustainable level. The

county government in consultation with stakeholders will carry out a comprehensive

review of existing rates.

o Improvement of revenue collection centres such as open air markets. Ensure optimal
staffing in the centres, supervisions and enforcement.

o Ensure transparency and accountability mechanism through maintaining registers and
records. This will also involve preparation of monthly defaulters list; repair and

maintenance of rental houses.

o Sensitization of stakeholderson revenue generation.
o Automation of Revenue Collection- mainly, the revenue collection systems are semi-

automated and manual; thus difficult to determine in certainty the amount being

collected. To address this, the county intend to establish fully automated revenue

collection system and eliminate the manual system. The receipt issued to the Cess

payers will be generated from a hand held gadgets. At the end of collection period,

the data from hand held gadget will be downloaded into a computerized system and

itemized collection list is generated. This is then reconciled to the actual collection.

o Staff training on revenue management. This will provide staff with appropriate tools
and equipment for efficient revenue collection for optimal revenue. In addition to

providing training in used of automated revenue system, the county will create a

condusive working environment by providing vehicle, office space and tools of

trade.

o Revenue Targets- staff involved in revenue collection will have targets upon which
their performance will be measured against.


5.4.1.2External Revenue Raising Strategies

The county government will pursue the following in order to raise external revenue:-

o Commission for Revenue Allocation Equalization Share. The national government
funding is capped at population (45%), poverty index (20%), land area (8%) basic

equal share (25%) and fiscal responsibility (2%) of the national revenue released by

the auditor general. The allocation is expected to gradually increase as more

functions are bundled and transferred to counties from the central Government. The

national Government funds are projected to grow by at least 20% per annum for the

next five years. However this will depend on the criteria that will be adopted by the

CRA over the period and the amount that will be allocated to the county

governments.

o Public Borrowing/Debt. The county will be able borrow to finance transformative
projects and key development projects from investment partners. To attract

investments (from local and international investors) the county has to aggressively

improve its key infrastructure and its ease of doing business environment to ease

movement of goods and services, communication and access to markets outside the

county. The investments in infrastructure are expected to increase economic activity

in the county, boost trading activities, and exploit the county’s enormous agricultural

and mineral potential. Cumulatively, these activities will grow the county’s revenue

base to support the borrowing.

o The county borrowing will be maintained at a sustainable level and will regularly be
reviewed through the annual County Fiscal Strategy Paper (CFSP) and County Debt

Management Strategy (CDMS). These strategies will be submitted to the County

Assembly for approval every budget cycle. Furthermore, the county government


106


borrowing will be guaranteed by the National Government. This will provide an

independent review to assure the debt is maintained at a sustainable level.

o Development Partners and Public Private Partnership (PPP). The county will
continually embark on building strong relations with existing and potential

development partners, non-state actors and other government agencies. The county

will seek PPP in key strategic sectors. Other sectors are also expected to benefit from

the development partners and PPPs include health, environment, natural resources,

road & transport, ICT, trade, cooperatives and industrialization.

o Protection Funds are the other sources of funds for the county. This will be mostly
implemented by the National Government but there is need for liaison and

coordination by the relevant departments to avoid duplication.

o Initiating joint funding frameworks and mechanisms with national government for
capital projects or sectoral programmes.

o Streamlining financial management systems to enhance credit worthiness.
o County economic blocks. This is an initiative that has potential to mobilize resources

from aligned counties for specific cross-county projects. Ideally, counties with

similar means of livelihoods need to act strategically instead of engaging in wasteful

competition and duplication of efforts. The Block can form formidable unit that can

engage development partners and investors with marked degree of magnitude and

impact to the residents. The county will seek alliance with common interest counties.


5.4.2 Asset Management

The county will enhance an efficient and effective asset management system that seeks to

reduce operating costs, raise cash and improve the service delivery and increase the useful

life of available resources. County assets include land and buildings, motor vehicles, plant

and machineries and equipment. The county government will institute prudent asset

management systems and processes, which will include-

o Developing an Assets Performance Measurement Framework to provide a framework
for performance management

o Development of county asset register
o Valuation of all county assets
o Uniform and consistent reporting formats for financial sustainability performance

measures

o Adoption of asset management accounting principles such as depreciation
o Disposal of obsolete assets as prescribed under the Public Procurement and Disposal

Act, 2005 or its amendment

o Timely and efficient repair and maintenance of assets to reduce wastage and
breakages

o Purchasing and operating high quality assets that generate value for money to the
county

o Allocation and application of assets’ system based on need and value addition to the
realization of integrated development plan

o Sharing of assets among various county government departments to reduce on
wastage

o Safeguarding and protection of assets to ensure maximum security and reduce cases
of theft

o Development and adoption of county asset management policy and law.


5.4.3 Financial Management Strategies


107


The success of this plan will largely depend on the financial management systems and

process adopted by the county government. The county government will therefore pursue

the following strategies-

o Full implementation of Integrated Financial Management Information System
(IFMIS) in all county departments

o Enhancing budget and expenditure control mechanisms
o Adopting prudent debt management policy
o Adopting accountability systems through continuous monitoring, reporting and

provision of timely financial information in accordance to accounting standards

o Adopting modern public accounting systems
o Ensuring compliance with public procurement policies systems
o Adopting efficient cash management system
o Strengthen local internal controls for efficiency and integrity
o Ensuring that there is adequate and qualified personnel in accounts and finance

department

o Enacting necessary county financial management laws
o Collecting, processing, maintaining, transmitting, and reporting data
o Supporting financial planning/budgeting activities.


5.4.4 Debt Management Strategies

The County Government’s borrowing plans remain anchored in the medium term Debt

Management Strategy which aims at ensuring public debt sustainability. The strategy

envisages possible borrowing from domestic and external sources. While external financing

will largely be on concessional terms the county treasury shall continue to diversify financing

sources. The County Government will ensure that the level of domestic borrowing does not

crowd out the private sector.

In the context of the 2018 MTDMS, the County Government is seeking diversification of

financing sources through establishing a platform for exploiting the domestic debt market as

well as international financial market. Therefore, through DMS the County Government will

be able to borrow through concessional agreements and engage in other Public-Private-

Partnerships (PPP) where debt is a consideration in order to finance development projects.


However, it is important to note that non-concessional external borrowing will be undertaken

in a cautious manner and limited to development projects. The National Government will

continue playing a key role in domestic debt market reforms to ensure the market remains

vibrant and continues to deepen as it provides an opportunity for the private sector

participation in accelerating the economic activities of the country.


5.6.5 Capital Financing

The county government will set aside at least 30% of all its resources to development to steer

holistic growth. PPPs and other partnerships will also be used to finance the projects.

Additionally, the county will undertake capital financing strategies to include the following:

o Asset liquidation and leasing
o Asset-based lending
o Equity negotiations
o Bank financing
o Government loans
o Identifying long term capital financing instruments
o Prioritizing infrastructure to be financed to minimize stalled projects


108


o Establishing and initiating public private partnership infrastructure funding
instruments and mechanisms

o Accessing affordable loans sourced locally or internationally.


5.6.6 Accountability

Accountability is anchored on effective public expenditure management during the CIDP

implementation that will be guided by three goals, namely:

o Aggregate Fiscal Discipline – the county should not spend more than it can afford.
o Allocative Efficiency – Budget deliberations can focus on policy changes and become

a powerful instrument for promoting the strategic priorities of the county thus

prioritize and spend on the right programmes and projects.

o Operational Efficiency - MTEF provides “predictability” of department/sector
budgets over the medium term and long term; thus departments are enabled to make

and implement plans for the restructuring and improvement of their service delivery

systems overcoming a precarious day-to-day perspective

The county government will pursue the following operational financing and accountability

strategies-

o Utilization of internal revenue to finance operational costs
o Maintenance of costs sharing in financing operational costs
o Efficient cash flow management to support operational costs and ensuring short term

borrowing for cash balance management is applied only when necessary

o Minimizing operational costs in service delivery
o Compliance with standards of financial reporting and control, and prudent

management of risk

o Sound processes and information infrastructure
o Continuous monitoring of public expenditures vis-à-vis the intended benefits.


5.7 Estimated Resource Gap and Measures of Addressing It

From the revenue projections against the budget estimates by sector, the resource gap and

measures on how to address the gap are detailed below.


Table 66: Resource Gap

5-Yr Revenue

Projections (Ksh.)

Million

5-Yr Budget Estimates

(Ksh.)

Million

Resource Gap

(Ksh.)

Million

CIDP 2018-2022 Budget

54.8 14.8 40.0


Measures of Addressing Resource Gap:

The resource gap represents the total deficit that is expected for all dockets for the CIDP

2018-2022. It is attributed to the increased number of projects that will be lauched for capital

intensive projects under youth & women empowerment, water, agriculture and education. A

substantial amout of the Kshs------------- shortfall will be addressed through:

o Increased revenue collection enhanced by automated collection system
o Funding Proposals based on transformative projects and specific sector projects that

clearly depict expected outcomes submitted to development partners and PPP

o Loans and grants applications


109


o Inter-county development programmes
o Use of innovative financing instruments such as Development Bond


110


CHAPTER 6: MONITORING AND EVALUATION FRAMEWORK


6.1 Introduction

This chapter presents the monitoring and evaluation framework that will be used to track

progress on implementation of programmes and projects at the county level. This will be

conducted through Lamu County Integrated Monitoring and Evaluation System (CIMES)

whose main aim is to improve the effectiveness in tracking the implementation of various

development policies, strategies and programmes. To ensure that there is a clear way of

measuring performance; Lamu County will develop a Performance Management Plan that

will see that all commitments made in the CIDP are translated into performance contracts

with Public Officers in the county


6.2 Data collection, Analysis and Reporting

Monitoring and Evaluation framework will be managed at the departmental level and

coordinated by the Economic Planning and the Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation units.

The CIMES guidelines and structures will be followed in M&E at the County level. The

public and implementing agencies will be engaged through these structures in monitoring

and evaluating the implementation of the CIDP.


Evaluation will be conducted with project improvement and policy enlightenment hence

acting as “decision-oriented” evaluation. This will provide valuable insights into how the

project is operating, the extent to which it is serving the intended beneficiaries, its strengths

and weaknesses, its cost – effectiveness and potentially productive directions for the future.

This evaluation will also provide the information for decision – thus helping to set priorities,

guides the allocation – of resources, facilititates the modification and refinement of project

structures and activities; and signal the need for additional personnel and resources. Finally,

it is also intended to determine a change of course for a project. Actual results of

development projects shall be measured in relation to the planned outcomes. All projects

will have a component on monitoring and evaluation right from the initial stages. Project

planning accountability will entail an effort to meet the diverse information interests and

expectations of all those who have a stake in a project e.g. beneficiaries, managers, staff,

donors and the public at large.


The county will undertake two types of evaluations for various projects namely mid-term

and end of project evaluations: Mid-term will be undertaken to review progress and propose

alterations to project design during the remaining period of implementation while end of

project evaluation will be conducted at the completion of the project period. The specific

types and timing of evaluations for various projects will be determined at the design and

planning stage of each project. The matrix for implementation, monitoring and evaluation is

detailed in each of the sector sub programmes in chapter 6. The matrix details the names of

sub programmes, costs, timeframes, monitoring indicators, monitoring tools, implementing

agencies, source of funds and implementation status for the various sectors. For

effectiveness, participatory methods and tools will be used throughout the project stages

from design to evaluation. Monitoring will entail continuous collection of data, collation and

analysis of data for decision and for use in subsequent evaluation events.


111


6.3 Monitoring and Evaluation Report Mechanism

Type of Report Purpose Frequency Responsibility Report to

Who

Annual Reports Detail annual achievements of the

county vis-à-vis the implementation

plan, outlining the targets met,

challenges and recommendations for

the subsequent programs/plan cycle

Annual CEC Governor

Semiannual reports Provides mid-year evaluation of the

county’s activities

Twice a

year

Chief Officers CEC/

County

Secretary

Quarterly Reports Details county’s status with regard

to achievement of the activities

outlined in the CIDP providing

opportunity for amendment and

recommendations based on

evaluation.

Quarterly Directors Chief

Officer

Monthly Activity

Reports

These will provide information with

regard to various county’s

programme/project activities

undertaken in the month as per the

work plan and public participations,

e.g. tracking reports, workshop

reports, policy status reports and

investor enquiry reports. It should

highlight the timelines met,

challenges and possible

recommendations

Monthly Directors Chief

Officer

Institutional

information

Information to staff on the status of

the County, achievements and

expectations including Human

Resource Management

Monthly CECs Governor

Public/Customer

Satisfaction Report

Conduct a public/Customer

satisfaction survey to gauge the level

of service delivery and satisfaction

Annually County

Secretary

Governor

Performance

Contract annual

evaluation report


The annual performance contract

report provides the status of

achievements attained by the county/

departments annually. This details

actual performance against target

contained in the performance

contract

Annually

and

Quarterly

CECs Governor


112


6.4 Summary of M&E Outcome indicators Agriculture, Rural and Urban Development

6.4.1 Agriculture Sub-sector


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target (2022)

Administrati

ve Planning

and Support

Services

Human

Resource

Development

and

Management

Efficiency and

staff productivity

improved

48 Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 48 50 52 staff

Administratio

n Support

Services

Improved service

delivery in a

conducive

environment

5 offices

at Wards

level

Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 5 7 10

Extension

Advisory

Services

Provision of

farmer

advisory

services

Improved crop

production and

income at farm

level

40,000

farmers

Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 10,200 22,000 52,000 farmers

Improvement

of the

agricultural

training

centre

Improved crop

production and

income at farm

level

7,000,000 Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 362,000 14,300 36,500

Crop

Production

and

Productivity

Improvemen

t

Farm

mechanizatio

n

Timely delivery of

tractor services in

the county

Tractors-

15,

trailers-5,

harrows-2,

disc

ploughs-

15

Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer Tractors- 15,

trailers-5,

harrows-2,

disc ploughs-

15

Tractors- 25,

trailers-8,

harrows-, disc

ploughs-25,

Planter-3,

Sheller-3

Tractors- 25,

trailers-8,

harrows-, disc

ploughs-25,

Planter-3,

Sheller-3

On-farm Increased 75 acres Department Chief Officer - 40 acres 80 acres


113


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target (2022)

irrigation production of

prime crops

of

Agriculture

Farm inputs

access

Increased crop

yield

- Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 50 soil

samples

50 soil samples

Increased crop

yield

124 tons

of seeds

Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 44.4 tons of

seeds

118 tons of

seeds

304 tons of

seeds

Improved crop

production

5,600 bags Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 3,300 bags of

fertilizer

13,000 bags

of fertilizer

40,000 bags of

fertilizer

Improved

production of

quality seed cotton

362 ton Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 80 tons 180 tons of

cotton seeds

400 tons of

cotton seeds

Improved

production of

quality coconut

products

50,000 Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 50,000

seedling of

coconut

100,000

seedling of

coconut

Pest and

disease

control

Improved crop

yield and

households

income

5 grain

storage

facilities

Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 1 grain

storage

facilities

2 grain

storage

facilities

5 grain storage

facilities

Improved crop

yield and

households
income

50 litres Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 480 litres

12 ULV

sprayers


1200 litres

12 ULV

sprayers


Climate

change

adaptation in

agriculture

Improved

resilience and

adaptability to

climate change

30% Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 30% 35% 40 %

Agriculture Improved cashew 30kg/tree Department Chief Officer 30kg/tree 40kg/tree 45kg/tree


114


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target (2022)

sector

development

support

Programme

nut production and

income

of

Agriculture


6 kg raw:

1 kg

processed

nuts


Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 6 kg raw: 1

kg processed

nuts

6 kg raw: 1

kg processed

nuts

6 kg raw: 1 kg

processed nuts

3,000

Entrepren

eurs of

cashew

nuts

Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer 3,000

Entrepreneurs

of cashew

nuts

3,250

Entrepreneurs

of cashew

nuts

3,450

Entrepreneurs of

cashew nuts

Value

addition and

Marketing

Processing of

crop produce

Increased income

from processed

fruits

- Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - - 1 factory

processing fruits

Cottage

industries

Increased shelf life

of farm produce

- Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 3

CIGs/VMGs

supported to

establish

cottage

industries

(coconut

5 CIGs/VMGs

supported to

establish cottage

industries

(coconut,

cashew nut,

simsim)

Agricultural

marketing

and

information

dissemination

Enhanced

marketing of food

in deficit areas

- Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 2 farm

produce

collection

centres

5 farm produce

collection

centres

Enhanced
marketing

regulations

(Prices, handling,

weight &

- Department
of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 2 times 5 times


115


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target (2022)

measures)

Enhanced

marketing

platforms (SMS

based, Website

based, Radio)

- Department

of

Agriculture

Chief Officer - 2 3


6.4.2 Livestock production Sub-sector


Progr

amme

Sub-

programm

e

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of Data Reporting

Responsibilit

y

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Livestock

Extension

service

delivery

% increase in

proportion of Farmers

depending on Livestock

Production as a

livelihood by June,

2022

40% Farm visits; Field days;

Farmer trainings; on-farm

demonstrations; Farmer

Barazas; Profiled value

chains; Supervision and

backstopping;

Stakeholders meetings

Reports

Chief officer 40% 65% 90%

% increase in quantity

of Livestock and

Livestock Products by

June 2022

40% Production records,
Chief officer

40% 65% 90%

% increase in quality of

Livestock and 40% Farm sales Records
Chief officer

40% 65% 90%


116


Progr

amme

Sub-

programm

e

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of Data Reporting

Responsibilit

y

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Livestock products by

June 2022

Livestock

Production

Improveme

nt

Increase in number of

livestock Produced by

June 2022

395,328 Breeds and breeding

improvement; Animal

husbandry improvement;

Livestock Feeds and

feeding improvement;

Access to financial and

insurance services reports

Chief officer 395,328 600,000 800,000

% increase of volumes

of Livestock products in

Lamu County by June

2022

40% Livestock products sales

reports; Livestock farm

production records

Chief Officer 40% 50% 60%

Livestock

Marketing,

Trade And

Value

Addition

% increase in volume of

livestock traded in

Lamu County by June,

2022

30% Livestock marketing

infrastructure (Sale yards,

Holding grounds;

Livestock marketing

organizations and

Cooperatives; Livestock

Marketing and agro-

weather information and

dissemination; Value

added Livestock Products

Reports

Chief officer 40% 60% 80%

% increase in household

income from sale of

value added Livestock

30% Value added Livestock

Products sales reports

Chief officer 40% 60% 70%


117


Progr

amme

Sub-

programm

e

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of Data Reporting

Responsibilit

y

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Products by June 2022.

Range

Resource

Manageme

nt And

Developme

nt

% increase in rangeland

carrying capacity and

livestock nutrition due

to improved range

conditions by June 2022

20% Fodder and Pasture

Production and

conservation; Range

water harvesting for

Livestock Production;

Ranch Development;

Pastoralism development;

Range improvement and

rehabilitation Reports

Chief Officer 30% 50% 70%


6.4.3 Veterinary Sub-sector


Programm

e

Sub-

programme

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibili

ty

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Veterinary

Services

Livestock Health

Improvement

Percentage of healthy

livestock increased

55% Monthly

reports

Chief

Officer

55% 70% 75%

Veterinary

Public health

Percentage increase of

quality and safety of

livestock & livestock

products produced

60% Monthly

reports

Chief

Officer

60% 74% 78%

Artificial Percentage increase in milk 30% Monthly Chief 30% 55% 65%


118


Insemination and meat produced reports Officer

Promotion of

livestock export

Zone

Percentage progress of LEZ 0 Monthly

reports

Chief

Officer

0% 20% 40%

Animal Welfare Percentage increase of

residents conscious OR

aware of animal welfare

35% Monthly

reports

Chief

Officer

35% 65% 71%

Hides, skins and

leather

development

Increased tonnage of quality

hides and skins produced

5 Monthly

reports

Chief

Officer

5 8 10


6.4.4 Fisheries Sub-sector


Programm

e

Sub-programme Outcome indicators Baselin

e

Source of Data Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-

term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

General

administrati

on,

planning

and support

services

Human resource

capacity building

and development

No of staff with skills

and knowledge offering

high quality services

54 Staff returns Chief

officer

54 70 86

Construction and

refurbishment of

offices

No of offices

constructed or

refurbished, fully

equipped and

operational

7 Department assets

inventory

Chief

officer

7 14 11,500


119


Programm

e

Sub-programme Outcome indicators Baselin

e

Source of Data Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-

term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Transport

enhancement

% increase in field

outreach activities and

client contact time

50% Social economic

assessment reports

Chief

officer

50 80 100

Project planning

and

implementation

No of annual

development plans

developed and

operationalized

1 Annual reports and

briefs

Chief

officer

1 3 5


No of M&E frameworks

developed and

operationalized

0 Annual reports and

bulletins

Chief

officer

1 3 5

Information

Communication

Technology

% of offices well

equipped with ICT tools

and other office

facilities.

40 Department asset

inventory

Chief

officer

40 80 100

No of communication

materials developed and

shared

0 Annual reports and

bulletins


Chief

officer

0 5 10

Fisheries

Developme

nt services

Fisheries

production and

productivity

Increase tonnage of fish

harvested and landed

annually


2,500

tones

Fisheries statistics

Annual reports and

bulletins

Chief

officer

2,500 4,000 5,600

% increase in uptake

and use of technology in

fishing

10% Economic and

social assessment

reports

Chief

officer

10 25 35

Fisheries

infrastructural

development

% increase in fish

preservation and

handling facilities

40% Department assets

inventory

Chief

officer

40 80 90

Product

development and

Tonnage of value added

fish products

20

tones

Fisheries statistics

bulletin

Chief

officer

20 55 70


120


Programm

e

Sub-programme Outcome indicators Baselin

e

Source of Data Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-

term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

marketing Annual reports

% of fish and fish

products accessing

highly competitive fish

markets

5% Fisheries statistics

bulletin

Annual reports

Chief

officer

5 25 40

Fisheries

extension and

training

% of fishers whose

skills and knowledge

have been enhanced

5% Economic and

social assessment

reports

Chief

officer

5 50 80

% of fisher folk using

improved technologies

in fishing and fisheries

related activities


5% Fisheries statistics

bulletin

Economic and

social assessment

reports

Chief

officer

5 25 40


6.5 Land, Physical Planning, Housing & Urban Development

6.5.1 Land, Physical planning, Housing and Urban Development Sub-sector

Table 42: Summary of M&E Outcome indicators

Programme Key Outcome Outcome

Indicators (KPI)

Baseline Source of Data

(for baseline)

Mid-term Targets

(2020)

End-term

Targets

(2022)

Reporting

Responsibility

P1: Physical planning -Inclusive,

sustainable and

resillient urban

areas

-Improved income

- No. of land use

plans prepared

20 County data 60% 40% County

Director of

Land &

Physical

Planning


121


Programme Key Outcome Outcome

Indicators (KPI)

Baseline Source of Data

(for baseline)

Mid-term Targets

(2020)

End-term

Targets

(2022)

Reporting

Responsibility

generating

activities

P2: Urban

development

Improved & well

managed urban

areas with

infrastructure &

services

- No. of well

managed

Municipality and

Town committees

-No. of urban areas

with improved

infrastructure &

services

0 County data 80% 20% County

Director of

Land &

Physical

Planning

P3: Housing Adequate &

affordable staff

housing & office

space

- Onestop shop for

county services

-Improved

employee

performance

-1 County

Office

building

County data 80% 20% County

Director of

Land &

Physical

Planning

P4: Land

administration

Secured land tenure No. of registered

claims on public &

private land

20


County data 80% 20% Director

Physical

Planning &

Urban

development


122


6.5 Sector 2: ICT, Energy & Infrastructure

Programme Sub Programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

1.General

administration

& support

services

Administration

and Planning

Improved public service

delivery and customer care

40% County

Report

CEC Lands 40% 6 9

Improved service

accessibility

30% 30% 6 8

Quality project delivery, co-

ordination & implementation

40% 40% 6 10

Human Resource

development.

Improved productivity and

efficiency of staff

30%


30%


7 8

Operations &

Services

Proper project co-ordination

and improved project

delivery

50% 50%

2.Road

Inrastructure

Planning and

Design

Safe standard and well

planned designs

10% County

Report

CEC Lands 10% 3 5

Roads

infrastructure

Development

To provide connectivity 40% 40% 30 50

Routine Roads

Infrastructure

Maintenance

To improve motorability. 30% 30% 60km 100km

Drainage

Infrastructure

Development &

Maintenance

To improve motorability,

improve drainage and make

it all weather road

40% 40%

300km


500km

Storm water

infrastructure

development

To improve access,

motorability, improve

drainage and make them all

20% 20%

60m


100m


123


Programme Sub Programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

weather roads

3.Transport Road Safety Ease of access, connectivity

and road safety

0% COUNTY

REPORT

CEC Lands 0% 10 15

Construction &

Maintenance of

Public Transport

Facilities

Improved public transport

system

0% 0% 3 3

Traffic

Management &

Control

Improved ease of movement 0% 0% 4 4

County

Transport

Services

Efficient

County transport services.


30%


30%

4 4

County Public

Sea Transport

Improved connectivity

between the mainland and

the islands

0% 0% 2 2

4.Public

Works

Building

Services

Improved building standards 20% COUNTY

REPORT

CEC Lands 20% 145 175

Structural

Services

Improved safety and sound

structures


50%


50%

115 140

Electrical works:

Public & Street

Lighting)

Improved visibility,

security& safety


30% 30% 3 4

Public & Street

Lighting

Maintenance

30% 30% 50% 100%

5.Energy Electricity ,gas

Reticulation and

energy regulation

Regulated

Energy infrastructure

0% County

Reports

CEC Lands 0%

Access to

electrification

Improve living standards 20% 20% 1 1


124


Programme Sub Programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Electrical works(

Public & Street

Lighting)

Improved visibility&

security in the region/county

50% 50% 8 8

Public & Street

Lighting

Maintenance

Improved security in the

region/county

200 20% 3 5

6.6 SECTOR: General Economic and Commercial Affairs

6.6.1 Finance Strategy and Economic Planning


Programme Subprogra

mme

Key Outcome Outcome Indicators

(KPI)

Baseline Source of Data

(for baseline)

Reporting

Responsib

ility

Mid-term

Targets

(2020)

End-term

Targets

(2022)

P1: Public

Finance

Management

Enhanced

efficiency and

effectiveness in

utilization of

public resources

Absorption Rate of

Development Funds

60% Directorate of

Budget

Directorat

e of

budget

80% 100%

P2: County

Economic

Planning &

Policy

Formulation


Evidence based

policies and

plans


Level of implementation

of projects

- Directorate of

Economic

Planning Data

Directorat

e of

Economic

Planning

60% 100%

P3: Revenue

Management

Increased

revenue

% of lamu budget

financed by local

revenue

2% Lamu

department of

revenue

Lamu

departmen

t of

revenue

5% 10%


125


6.6.2 Sub Sector: Trade


Sub-

programme

Sub

programme

Outcome

Indicators

Baseline Situation in 2018 Source of

data

Reporting

responsibil

ity

Mid-term

target

(2020)

End-term

target

(2022)

Trade

infrastructure

development

Increased

growth of

business

operation

30% 2 markets completed

3 on-going

1 jua kali shed

established

Department

data

Chief

officer

70% 80%

Trade credit increase in

business

sustainability

through access

to credit

12.3% 123 beneficiaries Department

data -

JLB

Chief

officer

80% 90%

Capacity

building

Increased

capacity

building of

entrepreneurs

35% 100 entrepreneurs

trained

Jua kali equipment’s

issued to 13 jua kali

associations.

Department

data

Chief

officer

70% 80%


Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

Indicators

baseline Situation in 2018 Source of

data

Reporting

responsibil

ity

Mid-term

target

(2020)

End-term

target

(2022)

Industrializatio

n and

investment

Industrializa

tion and

investment

promotion

Increased

investors in the

county

0 Department data investor forum

held in 2015

Chief

officer

60% 80%

Trade Weights and Improved 0 Department data No weights Chief 60% 80%


126


Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

Indicators

baseline Situation in 2018 Source of

data

Reporting

responsibil

ity

Mid-term

target

(2020)

End-term

target

(2022)

regulation measures standardization

of the packages

and measures

services/equip

ment in the

county

officer

Trade Legal

frame work

Developed

County

Trade

Investment

policy and

Revise trade

Acts

1

Department data

Trade

investment

policy

developed but

need some

amendments

and update

80% 100%


6.6.3 Sub Sector: Tourism

Programme Sub-Programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsi

bility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Expanding,

improving and

developing

tourism

support

services and

infrastructure

Tourism

Infrastructural

Development

Tourism Information

centre

1 Department

records

Chief

Officer

1 1 3

Tourism

Infrastructural

Development

Rehabilitated Tourist

areas

1 Department

records.

-NMK

Chief

Officer

1 3 5

Destination

Management

Wayside amenities

developed

0 Department

records

Chief

Officer

0 2 3

Tourism

Development

and

Regulation

Capacity Building Proportion of

improvement in

competency in service

delivery

2 Department

records

Chief

Officer

2 6 10


127


Programme Sub-Programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsi

bility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Capacity Building Number of tourism

ground handlers

empowered including

Youth, women and

PWDs

300 Department

records

Chief

Officer

300 1050 1900

Tourism

Information

development

Percentage increase in

access to information

20% Department

records

Chief

Officer

20% 60% 90%

Policy, Research

and Statistics

Existence of research

reports

0 Department

records

Chief

Officer

0 2 4

Tourism

products

development

and marketing

Tourism products

development

Number of new tourism

products improved

2 Department

records

Chief

Officer

2 6 10

Tourism marketing

and promotion

Number of events

participated in

3 Department

records

Chief

Officer

3 13 25

Consultative

stakeholder forums

Stakeholder consultative

meetings

1 Department

records

Chief

Officer

1 5 8

Co-operative

development

services

Revive Fishermen,

Livestock and

Agricultural based

Cooperatives

No of well managed and

vibrant marketing

Cooperatives

2 Annual

Cooperative

Statistics

Cooperati

ve

Departme

nt

2 5 9

Promotion of new

strategic cooperative

for youth and

women

No, of Youth and Women

Saccos

5 Annual

Cooperative

Statistics

Cooperati

ve

Departme

nt

5 10 20

Enforce compliance

with Co-operatives

Act and other

legislation

No.of compliant

Cooperative Societies,

10 Annual

Cooperative

Statistics

Cooperati

ve

Departme

nt

10 23 45


128


6.7 Sector: Health


Programme Sub programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source

of Data

Reporting

Responsibi

lity

Situation

in

2018(Bas

eline)

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

General

administration,

planning,

monitoring and

evaluation


HRManagement

& Development

% of clients satisfied with

health services

No data Annual

performan

ce report

County

Director of

Health

No data 85 90

HRManagement&

Development

No of nurses per 100,000

population

134 IPPD HR officer 134 190 228

Planning,

Monitoring &

Evaluation

Proportion of health units

with annual work plans

developed

31 Annual

work

plans

Chief

Officer

31 100 100

Leadership and

Governance

No of county health

stakeholders forum meetings

held

3 Meeting

minutes

County

Director of

Health

3 4 4

Leadership and

Governance

No of county health sector

policies and legislations

passed by County Assembly

0 Copies of

Acts and

policy

document

s

CECM

responsible

for Health

0 4 6

Health Products &

Technologies

Proportion of health facilities

reporting stock outs of tracer

commodities for more than 2

weeks

No data Support

supervisio

n reports

County

Pharmacist

No data 15 10

Health Financing Proportion of residents

covered by NHIF

13 NHIF

office

annual

Chief

Officer

13 70 95


129


Programme Sub programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source

of Data

Reporting

Responsibi

lity

Situation

in

2018(Bas

eline)

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

report

Health Financing Proportion of the county

government budget allocated

to health

29 Annual

budget

Report

Chief

officer

29 34 36

Health

Infrastructure

Percentage of population

living within 5 Km of a

health facility

80 Survey(K

DHS)

Chief

officer

80 87 90

Health Products Proportion of health facilities

equipped as per the norms

and standards

No data SARAM

report

County

Director of

Health

No data 90 100

Preventive and

Promotive

RMNCAH % of pregnant women

completing 4 ANC visit

68 DHIS-2 County RH

coordinator

68 77 85

Proportion of women of

child bearing age receiving

FP commodities

59 DHIS-2 County RH

coordinator

59 80 87

% of deliveries conducted by

Skilled birth attendants

65 DHIS-2 County RH

Coordinator

65 73 85

% of children <1year fully

immunized
76 DHIS-2 County

Nursing

Officer

76 85 90

No. of new cases of diabetes 1930 DHIS-2 CHRIO 1930 2000 2050

No of new cases of

hypertension

5207 DHIS-2 CHRIO 5207 5400 5700


130


Programme Sub programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source

of Data

Reporting

Responsibi

lity

Situation

in

2018(Bas

eline)

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

Proportion of women of

child bearing age screened

for cervical cancer

9.7 DHIS-2 County RH

Coordinator

9.7 18 30

Communicable

Diseases

prevention and

control

TB case notification per

100,000 population

324 TIBU/DH

IS-2

TB

Coordinator

324 432 523

Proportion of infants born to

HIV+ mothers who are

infected

8.9 EID

Dashboar

d

County

HIV/AIDS

Coordinator

8.9 5 4

Health Promotion

and Nutrition

Children under five

attending CWC clinic who

are stunted

20.3 KDHS/S

MART

Survey

County

Nutrition

Coordinator

20.3 19 17

Proportion of newborns with

low birth weight

(<2500gms)

3.8 DHIS-2 County

Nutrition

Coordinator

3.8 3.0 2.5

Curative &

rehabilitative

services


Rehabilitative

Services

No. of health facilities

upgraded with disability

friendly infrastructure

2 Support

supervisio

n reports

County

Rehabilitati

on

coordinator

2 10 20

County Referral

Services


No. of functional

ambulances as per the ideal

number specified in the

county referral strategy

4 Annual

maintenan

ce report

County

Referrals

Coordinator

4 9 9

Proportion of viral load, EID

and gene expert samples

with valid results sent to the

25 Laborator

y registers

County

Medical

Laboratory

Coordinator

25 60 80


131


Programme Sub programme Outcome indicators Baseline Source

of Data

Reporting

Responsibi

lity

Situation

in

2018(Bas

eline)

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

requesting facility

Hospital Services


Institutional maternal

mortality ratio

361 DHIS-2 County RH

Coordinator

361 290 250

Hospital average length of

stay

4 DHIS-2 CHRIO 4 3 2.5

Primary Health

Services


Per capita outpatient

utilization rate

2.2 DHIS-2 CHRIO 2.2 2.8 3.2

% of primary health facilities

offering BEmONC services

75 Kenya

Master

Facility

List

County RH

Coordinator

75 92 100

Health

Information

Services


% of health facilities

submitting timely reports

85 DHIS-2 CHRIO 85 95 98

No of facilities with an

electronic medical records

system

0 Support

supervisio

n reports

CHRIO 0 7 10


132


6.8 SECTOR: Social Protection, Culture and Recreation


6.8.1 Social Protection, Culture And Recreation Sector


Times


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situati

on in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

General

Administration,

Planning and

Supporting

Services

Planning and

operations

Percentage increase in

efficiency in operations.


50% County

Government

of Lamu

(CGL)

CECM

Education

60% 80% 100%

Increased coordination

among the staff

80% CGL 90% 100% 100%

Human

capital

1.Percentage increase in

competency

60% CGL 70% 100% 100%

2.Percentage increase in

efficiency, effectiveness

and satisfaction.

60% CGL 70% 90% 100%

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

Gender

Development

Gender

Development

Increased rate of social

inclusion of men and

women in Lamu County

30% CGL 35% 45% 75%

Decrease in the rate of

gender based violence in

Lamu county

60% CGL

NGO’s

55% 35% 10%

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

Social Services Social

infrastructure

and amenities

Proportion of residents

benefiting from the social

infrastructure and

amenities

10% CGL 15% 30% 50%

Percentage of cohesion

and integration in Lamu

30% CGL

NCIC

40% 60% 70%


133


Times


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situati

on in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

County

Social

services

empowermen

t programs

Rate of cohesion and

integration among the

residents of Lamu

County.

30% CGL

NCIC

Provincianal

administrati

on

40% 60% 70%

Rate of women and

persons with disabilities

economically empowered

through grants and social

support

0% CGL

FBO/CBO’s

5% 20% 30%

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

Youth Affairs Social

infrastructure

and

amenities.

Percentage of youth

benefiting from the social

infrastructure and

amenities.

0 CGL 3% 9% 15%

No. of youth rehabilitated

and integrated back to the

society

100 CGL

2.Red Cross

3. New leaf

rehabilitatio

n Centre

100 300 500

Socio-

economic

empowermen

t

No. of youth socially and

economically empowered

1,000 CGL 1,500 2,500 3,500

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

Sports

development

Sports

infrastructure

No. of residents using

sports infrastructure

20,000 CGL 30,000 48,000 60,000

Increased rate of people

taking up sports for

recreation and leisure

40% CGL

2.Sports

associations.

50% 65% 80%

Talent

development

No. of people whose

talents are developed and

10,000 CGL

2.Sports

11,000 16,000 20,000


134


Times


Programme Sub-

programme

Outcome indicators Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situati

on in

2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

and

promotion

promoted associations.

Percentage of people

utilizing sports talents

30% CGL

Sports

associations.

40% 60% 80%

Social

Protection,

Culture and

Recreation.

Culture and

heritage

development

Infrastructure

development

Percentage of culture

preserved and heritage

conserved

40% CGL

2.Lamu

Museums

50% 60% 70%

Culture and

arts

promotion

Percentage of cultural

practices branded and

promoted

30% CGL

2.Lamu

Museums

40% 60% 80%

Percentage of people

whose cultural talents

have been enhanced and

utilized

30% 40% 60% 80%


SECTOR: EDUCATION

Program

me

Sub

Program

me

Outcome Indicator Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situati

on in

2018

Mid

Term

(2020)

End Term

Target

(2022)

Education.


General

Administ
ration,

Planning

and

Support

Services

Planning

and
operations

Percentage increase in efficiency

in operations.

50% CGL CECM

Education

60% 80% 100%

Increased coordination among staff 80% CGL 90% 100% 100%

Human

capital

Percentage increase in competency 80% CGL 90% 100% 100%

Percentage increase in efficiency,

effectiveness and satisfaction

60% CGL 70% 90% 100%

ECDE Infrastruct

ure

Percentage increase in enrolment

to ECDE

86% CGL

2.MOE

90% 94% 96%

Percentage increase in the quality 60% CGL 70% 90% 100%


135


Program

me

Sub

Program

me

Outcome Indicator Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsib

ility

Situati

on in

2018

Mid

Term

(2020)

End Term

Target

(2022)

of education 2.MOE

Education

improvem

ent

Increased rate of transition from

ECDE to primary

98% CGL

2.MOE

100% 100% 100%

Increased rate of enrolment to

ECDE

86% 1CGL

2.MOE

86% 95% 100%

Increased rate of retention in

ECDE

98% CGL

2.MOE

98% 100% 100%

Increased level of competency 40% CGL, MOE 45% 55% 70%

Vocation

al

Training

Infrastruct

ure

Increase in rate of enrolment to

vocational training centres

25% CGL


30% 50% 70%

Percentage increase in the quality

of education

40% CGL 45% 55% 70%

Education

improvem

ent

Enhanced rate of employment for

graduates

60% CGL 65% 75% 90%

Educatio

n

Infrastruct

ure

Increased rate of enrolment in

schools

70% CGL

2.MOE

75% 85% 90%

Improved quality of education 40% CGL

2.MOE

45% 55% 70%

Education

improvem

ent

Increased rate of enrolment in

primary, secondary and tertiary

institutions

60% 1 CGL


2.MOE

60% 70% 80%

Increased rate of transition from

secondary to tertiary institutions

30% CGL

2.MOE

30% 40% 50%

Increased level of competency 40% CGL

2.MOE

45% 60% 70%


136


Sector: Environment, Water and Natural Resources

Table 43: Environmental protection, Water and Natural Resources

Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibilit

y

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

P1) Water

source

protection,

conservation

and

management

Water sources

protected

0 Reports Chief officer

for water

0 4No. Water

sources

protected

7No. Water

sources

protected

(P2)Water

supply….

Sufficient clean

water supplied

11 Reports Chief officer 11 Improvement

of 11No.

water

supplies.

11No. water

supplies

completed.

Distribution

line

Sufficient clean

water supplied

120Km Reports Chief officer

for water

120Km 30Km 58Km

Water

desalination

plants

Sufficient clean

water supplied

5 Reports Chief officer

for water

5 4 6

Fetching

water

Sufficient clean

water supplied

30 Reports Chief officer

for water

30 15 20

Sufficient clean

water supplied

30 Reports Chief officer

for water

30 2 4

Sufficient clean

water supplied

1000 Reports Chief officer

for water

1000 11 26

Reticulation

system

Water distributed

to consumers

3500 Reports Chief officer

for water

3500 2000 2000

Enough potable

water stored and

distributed by

15No. Reports Chief officer

for water

15No. 3No. 4No.


137


Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibilit

y

Situation

in 2018

Mid-term

Target

(2020)

End-term

Target

(2022)

gravity

Rain water

harvesting

structures

Rain water

harvested and

stored for

domestic use

400No. Reports Chief officer 400No. 4No. 8No.

Rain water

harvested and

stored for

domestic use

400No. Reports Chief officer

for water

400No. 4No. 8No.

Rain water

harvested and

stored for

domestic use

150No. Reports Chief officer

for water

150No. 7No. 11No.

Harvested rain

water for human,

animals and

irrigation use

10No. Reports Chief officer

for water

10No. 4No. 4No.

Harvest rain

water for human,

animal and

irrigation use

10No. Reports Chief officer

for water

10No. 1No. 1No.

Water Kiosk No. of people

served

50No. Reports Chief officer

for water

50No. 1No. 0

Water

Source

More fresh

surveyed

0 Reports Chief Officer 0 2 0


138


Sanitation, Environmental protection, Water and Natural Resources


Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-

term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

Waste

management

and sanitation

Waste Water

and

Sewerage

Management

% reduction of

diarrheal cases

14560 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

14560 15 25

% of households

with improved

sanitation

57 Survey Dept. Public

Health

57 70 80

Solid waste

management

% reduction of

diarrheal cases

14560 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

14560 15 25

% reduction of eye

infections

2614 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

2614 15 25

% of towns with

appropriate waste

disposal system

0 Dept. of

Environment

Director of

Environment

0 30 50

Hygiene and

Sanitation

% of households

with improved

sanitation

57 Survey Dept. Public

Health

57 70 80

% increase of

households with

hand washing

facilities

30 Dept. Public

Health

Dept. Public

Health

30 15 25

% reduction of

diarrheal cases

14560 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

14560 15 25

% reduction of

intestinal worms

cases reported

4460 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

4460 15 25

Vector and

vermin

% reduction of

malaria cases

1431 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

1431 15 25


139


Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-

term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

control % reduction of

Bilharzia cases

1170 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

1170 15 25

% reduction of

population infested

with jiggers

Dept. Public

Health

Dept. Public

Health

15 25

% reduction of

households infested

with bedbugs

Dept. Public

Health

Dept. Public

Health

15 25

Pollution

Control and

Regulation

Noise and

Air pollution

control and

regulation

% reduction of cases

of upper respiratory

diseases reported

46083 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

46083 15 25

% reduction of cases

of ear diseases

reported

3135 DHIS Dept. Public

Health

3135 15 25

% of the industries

complying to

pollution standards

Dept. of

Environment

Director of

Environment

60 70

Sea water

and Ground

water and

other surface

water

pollution

control

% reduction of

diarrheal cases

14560 Dept. Public

Health

Dept. Public

Health

14560 15 25

Proportion of bodies

of water with good

ambient water

quality (%)

50 Dept. of

Environment

Director

Environment

50 60 70

Natural

resources

conservation

and

management

Management

of sand and

stone

resources

% of acreage of

sand and stone

quarries

rehabilitated

0 Dept. of

Environment

Director

Environment

0 15 25

Forest

Management

% of forest cover 33.9 KEFRI

reports

Director

Environment

33.9 35 36


140


Programme Sub

programme

Outcome

indicators

Baseline Source of

Data

Reporting

Responsibility

Situation

in 2018

Mid-

term

Target

(2020)

End-

term

Target

(2022)

Wildlife

management

% reduction of

injuries to human by

wild animals

KWS Director

Environment

30 50

General

Administration

Human

Resources

Management

and

Development

% of staff

performances

(SPAs)

Department

PH,San. Env

CO 90 100

Operations % of Service

coverage

20 Department

PH,San. Env

CO 20 50 70

Planning,

monitoring

and

Evaluation

% of the

departmental

performance (PC)

Department

PH,San. Env

CO 90 100

Leadership

and

Governance

% of satisfied

customers

Department

PH,San. Env

CO 60 70


Sector: Public Administration and Inter-governmental Relations/ Governance, Justice, Law and Order

Programme

Sub

program

me

Outcome Indicators Baseline Source Of Data
Reporting

Responsibility

Mid-Term

Target

(2020)

End-Term

Target

(2022)

Public service

delivery and

coordination of

county affairs

Administr

ative

Support

Service

no. of village

administrators recruited

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

50 70

no.of induction traininigs

to village administrators

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

50 70

no.of motorvehicle

purchased

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

10 15


141


Programme

Sub

program

me

Outcome Indicators Baseline Source Of Data
Reporting

Responsibility

Mid-Term

Target

(2020)

End-Term

Target

(2022)

no.of ward offices fully

equiped

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

10 10

Lamu west and East sub

county HQs offices

constructed

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

2 2

Governors residence

constructed

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 1

Public

participati

on and

civic

education

No. Civic education

forum conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

120 200

No. of public

participation forum

conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

120 200

Civic education policy

framework developed

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 1

County Government

printer established

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 1

Formulati

on Of

County

Laws

And

Policies

No.of bills approved 0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

10 15

Enforcem

ent Of

County

Laws

No.of enforcement

officers recruited and

deployed

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

67 100

No.of law enforcement

officers trained

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

67 100

County

Legal

services

No.of awareness on

county laws raised

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

120 200


142


Programme

Sub

program

me

Outcome Indicators Baseline Source Of Data
Reporting

Responsibility

Mid-Term

Target

(2020)

End-Term

Target

(2022)

Public safety and

social order

Drugs,

Alcohol

and

Pornogra

phy

Control

no.of bills on drugs,

ponorgraphy and alcohol

control and Management

passed

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

3 3

no.of drugs, ponorgraphy

and alcohol control

awareness programs

conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

120 320

no.of county hospitals

implementing MAT

program

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

2 7

Recovery and

rehabilitation centre

established

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 3

Marine

safety

policy and bill on coast

guard drafted and

passed.

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 2

no.of search and rescue

boats procured

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

4 12

no.of safety awareness

programs conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

120 320

Search and Rescue unit

established

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 3

Drought

Managem

ent

Lamu County Drought

Management bill

enacted.

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 2

Reviewed and

implemented County

contigency plan on EDE

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

6 14

no.of food assessment

surveys conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

6 16


143


Programme

Sub

program

me

Outcome Indicators Baseline Source Of Data
Reporting

Responsibility

Mid-Term

Target

(2020)

End-Term

Target

(2022)

no. of CMDRR

strategies adopted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

3 8

Fire

Safety

no.of fully equiped

county fire units

established.

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

3 5

County fire safety and

prevention policy

formulated

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

0 0

no.of fire stations

constructed and equiped

1 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

1 0

no.of fire drills and

trainings conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

24 50

no.of fire safety public

awareness fora

conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

120 120

Floods

Managem

ent

no. floods risk

assessments conducted

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

4 4

no.of floods vulnerability

sensitization compaigns

conducted.

0 Office of the Director of

administration

Chief Officer

PSMA

4 4


county

leadership and

governance

Managem

ent of

executive

Affairs

no.of policies formulated

and implemented

0 CS Office Chief officer

PSMA&A

15 30

% implentation level of

county executive

decisions

20% CS Office Chief officer

PSMA&A

100% 100%

Strategic

leadership

and

efficiency

monitorin

g

% level of effciency in

the implementation of

county programmes

30% CS Office Chief officer

PSMA&A

100% 100%


144


Programme

Sub

program

me

Outcome Indicators Baseline Source Of Data
Reporting

Responsibility

Mid-Term

Target

(2020)

End-Term

Target

(2022)

Human Resource

Management

Recruitm

ent and

placement

Developed Departmental

succession plan

mechanism

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

13 13

Rolled out Human

Resource Management

Integrated System

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

1 1

Software for records

management

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

1 1

Fitted movable fire proof

registry

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSM/A

2 2

3 Human Resource

policies developed

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSM/A

2 2

Jobs advertised 0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

6 6

Staff

Develop

ment

Continous capacity

building of staffs

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

200 200

training needs

assessment

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

13 13

skill assessment 0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

13 13

Formulated County

Skills Inventory

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

1 1

Induction training 0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSM/A

80% 90%

Performa

nce

Mangeme

nt

Performance appraisal

and performance

contract for the County

for CEC to approve

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

90% 100%

compliance to

Occupational Health and

Safety Regulations

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

70% 80%


145


Programme

Sub

program

me

Outcome Indicators Baseline Source Of Data
Reporting

Responsibility

Mid-Term

Target

(2020)

End-Term

Target

(2022)

Public

service

delivery

public service day to

showcase services

offered by different

County

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

50% 50%

Conducted Public and

employee Satisafction

survey

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

60% 70%

Annual sensitization

forum on Government

guidelines and

frameworks

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer 40% 60%

compliance to Ethics and

anti-corruption Act

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer 60% 80%

Employe

e

motivatio

n

incentive mechanism for

the County

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

50% 50%

Medical cover available 100% Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

100% 100%

County staffs mortgage

scheme

0 Office of HRM Chief Officer

PSMA

50% 50%


146


NEW PROJECT PROPOSALS


1. Projects Earmarked for Witu Ward


Project

Name/Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Agriculture Sub-sector

Extension

Advisory

Services

To improve

adoption of

new

farming

technologie

s

2000 farmers Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations, agricultural

shows

15M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Crop production

and income at

farm level will

increase.

Farm Tractor

service

To

mechanize

land

preparation

for crop

production

Tractors and

3 disc

ploughs

1 Sheller

1 planter

Provide ploughing

services/acre at Ksh 2,000,

produce transport service at

Ksh 250/km, maintenance of

existing fleet

17M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Expansion of

land for crop

production at

affordable cost.

On-farm

irrigation

To put

more land

under

irrigation

2 Irrigation

projects

Identify project area,

Design the project,

Survey the project area,

Lay out the irrigation

system, train irrigation

farmers

16M LCG 2019 and

2020

Department

of

Agriculture

More land is put

under irrigation

Procure and

distribute

(maize seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials

30 tons Acquisition of seeds from

Kenya seeds company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

8M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

The seeds will

be purchased

from Kenya seed

Company


147


Project

Name/Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

peas and green

grams)

by resource

poor

farmers

recruited farmers

Inputs access

programme

To improve

soil fertility

8,000 bags Acquisition of fertilizer from

NCPB

Distribute fertilizer to the

recruited farmers

Enforcement of input

standards

15.75M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Improves soil

fertility

Cotton

revitalization

and expansion

To expand

acreage

under

cotton

80 tons Acquisition of cotton seeds

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers, Training

of cotton farmers

8M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Cotton supply

increased for

ginners

Coconut

development


To expand

coconut

orchards

100,000

seedlings

Acquisition of coconut

seedlings

Distribute seedlings to the

recruited farmers

10M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

The crop will

improve crop

acreage and

canopy

Construction

of grain

storage

facilities

To reduce

post harvest

losses

1 Site identification, farmer

groups mobilization, design

and BoQ development,

tendering and award of

contract, construction,

production

5M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Will ease

marketing of

farm produce

Pest and

disease control

To reduce

crop

produce

losses

1 army

worm

trap,24 liters

pesticide, 2

ULV sprayer

Install army worm traps,

Train and equip spraying

gangs, To have a stock to

combat any notifiable pest

infestation, To protect

farmers from chemical

effects

3M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


148


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Construction

of produce

collection

centres

To aggregate

volumes of crop

produce for ease

marketing

5 Plans and BQ preparation

EIA

Tendering

Construction

Inspection

Commissioning

Payment

2M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Collectio

n of farm

produce

will be

easier to

the

markets

Establishmen

t of cottage

industries

To enhance value

addition of farm

produce to

increase farmer’s

income

Cashewnut,

sim sim

and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups making

crop products

Make products

2.25M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Value

addition

will

improve

shelf life

of farm

produce

Agricultural

sector support

To transform

agricultural

production into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Cashewnut

VCAs

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and

improvement,

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

2.8M LCG/N

G

5 years Department of

Agriculture


Climate

Smart

Agriculture

To increase crop

productivity and

enhance resilience

to climate change

risk

CIGs AND

VMGs,

Vulnerable

and

marginalize

Climate risk, Climate

profile development, water-

harvesting, drought

resistant crops, kitchen

gardens, food security

26,65M LCG/N

G

5 years Department of

Agriculture


149


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Remarks

d groups,

common

interest

groups

assessments, CIG and

VMGs micro projects,

agro-forestry.


Livestock Production Sub-sector

Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Construction

and/or

Refurbishme

nt of Offices

Improved service

delivery

1 office


Construction and fencing

1 office

4.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Office

furniture and

equipments

Purchase of office

furniture and equipments

and equipments

1.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Animal

Disease

control

Reduce outbreaks

of trade sensitive

diseases

250,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

Livestock vaccination


20M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

2 points

established

Establish Livestock

movement control point

0.6M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Veterinary

Clinical

services

Improved

livestock health

250,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

Purchase of veterinary

drugs and supplies

25M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Animal

Disease

Vector

Reduce

prevalence of

animal vector-

12,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

Purchase of 12,000

Trypanocidal drugs

1.2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL


150


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Control borne diseases purchased

2000 litres

vector control

pesticides

purchased

Purchase of 2000 litres

vector control pesticides

9.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Crush pens Construction of crush 2

pens

2.4M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Tsetse traps &

targets

Purchase and installation

of 1,200 tsetse traps &

targets

1.8M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Trainings 8 Farmers’ group

trainings on tsetse control

3.2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

4 Staff trainings on tsetse

control

0.6M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Veterinary

Public Health

To safeguard

human and

animal health

Slaughter slab Construction of 1

slaughter slab

4.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Fisheries Sub-sector

Establishment of

seed production

system (fish

hatchery)

To enhance

farmed fish

production,

food security

1 Fish seed production is

integral in

aqua/mariculture. To

support fish farming,

fundamental facilities

such as fish hatchery will

be established

5M LCG 1 – 5 years Department

of Fisheries


Land Sub-sector


151


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Renovation

of existing

government

houses in

Witu

To improve

quality of houses

in the County

18

units

Refurbishment 27M CGL FY

2018/2019-FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing


Construction

of new

residential

houses in

Witu

To increase the

number of quality

housing in the

county

8 units Design and

documentation,

procurement and

construction

50M CGL FY

2018/2019-FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND


Installation of

streetlights in

Witu Town,

Chalaluma,

Moa,

Pandanguo,

Dide Warede

To improve

security in the

village

20 streetlights

at Strategic

places

Erection of streetlights 70M CGL FY

2018/2019-FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing


Upgrading of

shallow wells

To provide

adequate water to

residents

5 community

wells

Drilling & fixing of

manual hand pump

(borehole)


2. Projects Earmarked for Hongwe Ward

Agriculture Sub-sector

Extension

Advisory Services

To improve

adoption of

new farming

1,500 farmers Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations, agricultural

shows

14,00

0,000

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


152


technologies

On-farm

irrigation

To put more

land under

irrigation

2 Irrigation

projects

Identify project area,

Design the project,

Survey the project area,

Lay out the irrigation system,

train irrigation farmers

8,000

,000

LCG 2020 and

2021

Department of

Agriculture


Farm inputs

access

programme

To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials by

resource

poor farmers

30 tons Acquisition of seeds from

Kenya seeds company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

8,600

,000

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Fertilizer

access

programme

To improve soil

fertility

8,000 bags Acquisition of fertilizer

from NCPB

Distribute fertilizer to the

recruited farmers

16,000,0

00

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Improves soil

productivity

Cotton

revitalization

and

expansion

To expand

acreage under

cotton

80 tons Acquisition of cotton

seeds

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers, Training

of cotton farmers

8,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Cotton supply

will increase for

ginners

Pest and
disease

control

To reduce crop

produce losses

1 army worm
trap,24 liters

pesticide, 2

ULV sprayer

Install army worm traps,

Train and equip spraying

gangs, To have a stock to

combat any notifiable pest

infestation, To protect

farmers from chemical

3,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


153


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

effects

Construction

of produce

collection

centres

To aggregate

volumes of crop

produce for ease

of marketing

5 Plans and BQ preparation

EIA

Tendering

Construction

Inspection

Commissioning

Payment

2,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Collection of

farm produce will

be easier to the

markets

Establishmen

t of cottage

industries

To enhance value

addition of farm

produce to

increase farmer’s

income

Cashewnut,

sim sim and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups making

crop products

Make products

2,250,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Value addition

will improve

shelf life of farm

produce


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Time

frame

Implement

ing Agency

Remarks

Agricultural

sector support

To transform

agricultural

production into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Cashewnut

VCA

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and

improvement,

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

2,800,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Livestock Production Sub-sector


154


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Time

frame

Implement

ing Agency

Remarks

Animal

Disease

control

Reduce outbreaks

of trade sensitive

diseases

250,000

cattle,

sheep, goats

& poultry

Livestock vaccination


20M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1 Livestock

movement

control

points

established

Establish 1 Livestock

movement control point

0.1M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary

Clinical

services

Improved livestock

health

250,000

cattle,

sheep, goats

& poultry

Purchase of veterinary

drugs and supplies

12.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal

Disease

Vector

Control

Reduce prevalence

of animal vector-

borne diseases

Pumps Purchase of 40 livestock

spray pumps

8M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Trypanocid

als

Purchase of 12,000

Trypanocidal drugs

1.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Pesticides Purchase of 2000 litres

vector control pesticides

9.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Pesticides Purchase of 1000 litres

vector control pesticides

4.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

2 Crush

pens

constructed

Construction of crush 2

pens

2.4M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1200 Tsetse

traps &

targets

Purchase and installation

of 1,200 tsetse traps &

targets

1,800,00

0

CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


155


Project

Name/Locati

on

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Time

frame

Implement

ing Agency

Remarks

installed

8 Farmers’

group

trained on

tsetse

control

8 Farmers’ group trainings

on tsetse control

3,200,00

0

CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

4 Staff

trained on

tsetse

control

4 Staff trainings on tsetse

control

600,000 CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary

Public Health

To safeguard

human and animal

health

1 Slaughter

slab

established

Construction of 1

slaughter slab

4,000,00

0

CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Fisheries

Establishment

of feed

production

system

(pelletizer)

To enhance farmed

fish production, food

security

1 Fish feed production is

integral in

aqua/mariculture. To

support fish farming,

fundamental facilities such

as feed production plants

are necessary

5,000,00

0

LCG 1 – 5

years

Department

of Fisheries


Lands Sub-sector

Construction

of new

residential

houses in

Mpeketoni

To increase the

number of quality

housing in the

county

4 units Design and

documentation,

procurement and

construction

25,000,000 CGL FY

2018/2019-

FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND


156


3. Projects Earmarked for Mkunumbi Ward


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Agriculture Subsector

Extension

Advisory

Services

To improve

adoption of

new farming

technologies

1500 Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

14M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


On-farm

irrigation

To put more

land under

irrigation

2 Irrigation

projects

Identify project area,

Design the project,

Survey the project area,

Lay out the irrigation

system, train irrigation

farmers

8M LCG 2020

and

2021

Department

of

Agriculture


Farm inputs

access
To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials by

resource poor

farmers

30 tons

(maize seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and green

grams)

Acquisition of seeds

from Kenya seeds

company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers,

Farm inputs surveillance

8.25M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Fertilizer access To improve

soil fertility

8,000 bags Acquisition of fertilizer

from NCPB

Distribute fertilizer to

the recruited farmers

16M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Improves

soil fertility

Coconut

development
to expand

coconut

100,000

seedlings
Acquisition of coconut

seedlings

10M LCG 5 years Department

of


157


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

orchards Distribute seedlings to

the recruited farmers

Agriculture

Cotton

revitalization

and expansion

To expand

acreage under

cotton

80 tons Acquisition of cotton

seeds

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

Training of cotton

farmers

8M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Cotton

supply

increased

for ginners

Pest and disease

control
To reduce

crop produce

losses

1 army worm

trap,24 liters

pesticide, 2

ULV sprayer

Install army worm traps,

Train and equip spraying

gangs, To have a stock

to combat notifiable pest

infestation, Trainings on

safe use

3M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Construction of

grain storage

facilities

To reduce post

harvest losses

1 Site identification,

farmer groups

mobilization, design and

BoQ development,

tendering and award of

contract, construction,

production

5M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Construction of

produce

collection

centres

To aggregate

volumes of

crop produce

for ease

marketing

5 Plans and BQ

preparation

EIA

Tendering

Construction

Inspection

Commissioning

Payment

2M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Collection

of farm

produce will

be easier to

the markets

Establishment of To enhance Cashewnut, Formation of groups 2.25M LCG 5 years Department Value


158


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

cottage

industries

value addition

of farm

produce to

increase

farmer’s

income

sim sim and

coconut

Training of groups

Tour the groups making

crop products

Make products

of

Agriculture

addition will

improve

shelf life of

farm

produce

Climate Smart

Agriculture

To increase

crop

productivity

and enhance

resilience to

climate

change risk

CIGs and

VMGs,

Vulnerable

and

marginalized

groups,

common

interest groups

Climate risk, Climate

profile development,

water-harvesting,

drought resistant crops,

kitchen gardens, food

security assessments,

CIG and VMGs micro

projects, agro-forestry.

26.65M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Agricultural

sector support

To transform

agricultural

production

into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Cashewnut

VCAs

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and

improvement,

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

2.8M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Livestock production Sub-sector

Beef value chain

improvement

project

Increase Beef

production

Support 3

Community

Beef bull

camps, 2

husbandry

trainings

Procure 30 Beef bull and

Distribute to 3

Community groups.

10 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2019

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock

and

Cooperative

development


Mkunumbi

Livestock feed

strategic reserve

To build

pastoralists

resilience and

Support 1

Pasture CIG

in Mkunumbi

Construction of a hay

ban and fencing of 500

acres of natural pasture

20M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

2018 -

2022

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock


159


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

end drought

emergencies

for harvesting and

balling, Purchase of

seeds and equipment,

KCSAP, and

Cooperative

development

Galla Goats

improvement

project

Increase Meat

goats

production

Support 1

Community

buck camp, 2

husbandry

training

Purchase 400 Galla

Bucks from Gicheha

farm for upgrading the

existing gene pool

4 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2019

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock

and

Cooperative

development


Indigenous

Chicken

improvement

project

Increase

Indigenous

Chicken

production

Support 10

community

groups on

indigenous

chicken.

Construct 5 indigenous

Chicken model poultry

houses and relevant

equipment

10 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock

and

Cooperative

development


Auction Ring Increase

access to

market and

increase

household

income of

both the

pastoralists

and agro-
pastoralists

Support the

establishment

of 1 Auction

ring and crush

Construction of

Livestock Auction Ring

3 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock

and

Cooperative

development


Poultry sale

Yard and

slaughter slab


Increase the

volume of

poultry

marketed and

increase

household

Support the

establishment

of 1 poultry

sale yard and

1slaughter

slab

Construction of 1 Sale

Yard and 1 Slaughter

Slab.

4 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock

and

Cooperative

development


160


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

income

Construction of

water trough

Improve water

access to

livestock

2 water tough Construction of 2

Livestock water troughs

1.2 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP

Lands,

2018 -

2022

Department

of Fisheries,

Livestock

and

Cooperative

development


Veterinary Sub-sector

Animal

Disease control

Reduce

outbreaks of

trade sensitive

diseases

250,000

cattle, sheep,

goats &

poultry

vaccinated

Livestock vaccination

exercise

20M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

3 livestock

movement

control points

established

Establishing Livestock

movement control points

0.6M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary

Clinical services

Improved

livestock

health

250,000

cattle, sheep,

goats &

poultry

vaccinated

Purchase of veterinary

drugs and supplies

12.5 M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal Disease

Vector Control

Reduce

prevalence of

animal vector-

borne diseases

1 cattle dip

constructed

Construction of cattle dip 3M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

40 Spray

pumps

purchased

Purchase of 40 livestock

spray pumps

8M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


161


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

12,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

purchased

Purchase of 12,000

Trypanocidal drugs

1.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1000 Litres

of Pesticide

purchased

Purchase of 1000 litres

vector control pesticides

4.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

2 Crush pens

constructed

Construction of crush 2

pens

2.4M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1,200 Tsetse

traps &

targets

installed

Purchase and installation

of 1,200 tsetse traps &

targets

1.8M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

8 Farmer’

groups

trained

8 Farmers’ group

trainings on tsetse control

3.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

4 Staff

trained on

tsetse control

4 Staff trainings on tsetse

control

0.6M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary

Public Health

To safeguard

human and

animal health

1 Slaughter

slab

established

Construction of 1

slaughter slab

4.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


162


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Fisheries sub-sector

Development of

fish farming

To provide

alternative

source of

livelihood to

farmers

100 Fish ponds will be

excavated and stocked

with fingerlings.

4M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department

of Fisheries


Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

modern fishing

technology

(GPS, fish

finders,

compasses)

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is necessary.

Fishing gears will be

procured and distributed

to fisher folks through the

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

1M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department

of Fisheries


Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

engines

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is necessary.

Fishing gears will be

procured and distributed

to fisher folks through the

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

3M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department

of Fisheries


Lands Subsector

Installation of

streetlights in

To improve

security in the

10

streetlights

Erection of streetlights CGL


FY

2018/201

CGL

Ministry of Housing


163


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Ndambwe,

Mapenya,

Mkunumbi

village at Strategic

places

9-FY

2021/202

2

National Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND

Upgrading of

shallow wells

To provide

adequate

water to

residents

5 community

wells

Drilling & fixing of

manual hand pump

(borehole)

15M CGL


CGL

Ministry of Housing


4. Projects Earmarked for Bahari Ward


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Agriculture Sub-sector

Extension

Advisory

Services

To improve

adoption of

new farming

technologies

1500 Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

15M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Farm Tractor

service

Open up

more land for

crop

production

5 Tractors and

5 disc ploughs

operational

1planter and1

sheller to be

purchased

Ploughing services/acre

at Ksh 2,000, produce

transport service at Ksh

250/km, maintenance of

existing fleet

53M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Construction of

new

accommodation

hostel at the

To improve

training and

accommodati

on services

20 room

hostel

Plans and BQ

preparation

EIA

Tendering

40M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

The project

will increase

accommodati

on facilities


164


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

LKATC Construction

Inspection

Commissioning

Payment

enhance

revenue

generation

Input access To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials by

resource poor

farmers

30 tons

(maize seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and green

grams)

Farm inputs

surveillance

Acquisition of seeds

from Kenya seeds

company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry, Trainings on

effective use of farm

inputs,

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

8.6M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Procure and

distribute

(maize seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and

green grams)

Fertilizer access To improve

soil fertility

8,000 bags Acquisition of fertilizer

from NCPB

Distribute fertilizer to

the recruited farmers

16M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Improves soil

fertility

Cotton

revitalization and

expansion

To expand

acreage

under cotton

80 tons Acquisition of cotton

seeds,

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers,

Training of cotton

farmers

8M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Cotton supply

increased for

ginners

Pest and disease

control
To reduce

crop produce

losses

1 army worm

trap,24 liters

pesticide, 2

ULV sprayer

Install army worm traps,

Train and equip spraying

gangs, To have a stock

to combat notifiable pest

infestation, Trainings on

safe use

3M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


165


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Construction of

grain storage

facilities

To reduce

post harvest

losses

1 Site identification,

farmer groups

mobilization, design and

BoQ development,

tendering and award of

contract, construction,

production

5M LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture


Construction of

produce

collection centres

To aggregate

volumes of

crop produce

for ease

marketing

5 Plans and BQ

preparation

EIA

Tendering

Construction

Inspection

Commissioning

Payment

2,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Collection of

farm produce

will be easier

to the markets

Establishment of

cottage industries

To enhance

value

addition of

farm produce

to increase

farmer’s

income

Cashewnut,

sim sim and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups making

crop products

Make products

2,250,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of

Agriculture

Value

addition will

improve

shelf life of

farm produce

Agricultural

sector support

To transform

agricultural
production

into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Cashewnut

VCAs

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and
improvement,

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

2,800,00

0

LCG 5 years Department

of
Agriculture


Climate Smart

Agriculture

To increase

crop

CIGs and

VMGs,

Climate risk, Climate

profile development,

26,650,0

00

LCG 5 years Department

of


166


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

productivity

and enhance

resilience to

climate

change risk

Vulnerable

and

marginalized

groups,

common

interest groups

water-harvesting,

drought resistant crops,

kitchen gardens, food

security assessments,

CIG and VMGs micro

projects, agro-forestry.

Agriculture


Livestock Sub-sector


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Livestock feed

strategic researve

To build

pastoralists

resilience and

end drought

emergencies

Support 1

Pasture CIG

Construction of a hay

ban and fencing of 500

acres of natural pasture

for harvesting and

balling, Purchase of

seeds and equipment,

20M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018 -

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Dairy value chain

improvement

project

Increase milk

production

2 dairy bull

camp, 1

husbandry

training,Milk

value chain

supported.

Purchase 30 Jersey

Dairy Bulls and

distribute to 3

Community Groups

5 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Indigenous

Chicken

improvement

project

Increase

Indigenous

Chicken

production

Support 5

community

groups on

indigenous

chicken.

Construct 5 indigenous

model poultry houses

and relevant equipment

10 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Beekeeping Increase Support 2 Purchase of 1000 5 M LCG, 2018- Department of


167


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Improvements


production of

honey,

wax,pollen,v

enom,

groups Modern Bee Hive RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2022 Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development

Auction Ring Increase

access to

market and

increase

household

income of

both the

pastoralists

and

agropastorali

sts

Support the

establishment

of 1 Auction

ring and crush

Construction of 1

Livestock Auction Ring

3 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Construction of

honey processing

plant

Improve

honey quality

1 honey

processing

plant

Construction and

equipping of 1 honey

processing Plant

15 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Construction of

water trough

Improve

water access

to livestock

4 water tough Construction of 2

Livestock water troughs


1M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP

Lands,


2018 -

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Support groups

with Beekeeping

Equipment and

Accessories

Provide

alternative

livelihood

community

groups

5 groups Purchase of 1000

Beehives, 500 beehive

harvesting suits and

other assorted

accessories, Trainings,

10M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP

Lands,

2018 -

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


168


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Processing honey,

Sitting, fencing of apiary

sites.


Veterinary Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Establishment of

seed production

system (fish

hatchery)

To enhance

farmed fish

production,

food security

1 Fish seed production is

integral in

aqua/mariculture. To

support fish farming,

fundamental facilities such

as fish hatchery will be

established

5M LCG 1 - 5

years

Department of

Fisheries


Landing site

development

To enhance

fishing

operations

1 A modern landing site with

all necessary facilities

(toilets, offices, potable

water, perimeter fence will

be constructed.

5M LCG 1 - 5

years

Department of

Fisheries


Development of

fisheries

demonstration

centre

To support

fisheries

operation

1 Fisheries demonstration

centre will entail

construction of

demonstration facilities

such as (fishing ponds,

hatchery and IT centres that

will be key for training

fishers/farmers o topical

issues of fisheries interest

50M LCG 1 -5

years

Department of

Fisheries


169


170


Lands Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Renovation of

existing

government

houses in

Mpeketoni

Township and

Bahari

To improve

quality of

houses in the

County

21

units

Refurbishment 31M CGL


FY

2018/20

19-FY

2021/20

22

CGL

Ministry of

Housing


Construction of

new residential

houses in

Mpeketoni

To increase

the number

of quality

housing in

the county

32 units Design and documentation,

procurement and

construction

200M CGL FY

2018/20

19-FY

2021/20

22

CGL

Ministry of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND


Projects Earmarked for Hindi Ward

Agriculture Sub sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Extension

Advisory

Services

To improve

adoption of

new farming

technologies

1,500

farmers

Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

15,000,0

00

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


171


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Farm Tractor

service

Mechanize

land

preparation

for crop

production

2 Tractors

and 2 disc

ploughs

1 Sheller

1planter

Ploughing services/acre at

Ksh 2,000, produce

transport service at Ksh

250/km, maintenance of

existing fleet

17,000,0

00

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


On-farm

irrigation

To put more

land under

irrigation

1 Irrigation

project

Identify project area,

Design the project,

Survey the project area,

Lay out the irrigation

system, train irrigation

farmers

4,000,00

0

LCG 2019

and

2020

Department of

Agriculture


Farm inputs

access
To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials by

resource poor

farmers

30 tons

(maize

seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and

green

grams)

Acquisition of seeds from

Kenya seeds company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

8,750,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Fertilizer access

programme
To improve

soil fertility

8,000 bags


Acquisition of fertilizer

from NCPB

Distribute fertilizer to the

recruited farmers

Enforcement of input

standards

Inputs surveillance


16,250,0

00

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Improves

soil fertility

Cotton

revitalization and

expansion

To expand

acreage under

cotton

80 tons Acquisition of cotton seeds

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

8,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Cotton

supply

increased for


172


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

ginners

Coconut

rehabilitation and

expansion

To expand

coconut

orchards

10,000

seedlings
Acquisition of coconut

seedlings

Distribute seedlings to the

recruited farmers

10,000,0

00

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Construction of

grain storage

facilities

To reduce

post harvest

losses

1 Site identification, farmer

groups mobilization, design

and BoQ development,

tendering and award of

contract, construction,

production

5,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Pest and disease

control
To reduce

crop produce

losses

1 army

worm

trap,24

liters

pesticide, 2

ULV

sprayer

Install army worm traps,

Train and equip spraying

gangs, To have a stock to

combat any notifiable pest

infestation, To protect

farmers from chemical

effects

3,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Construction of

produce

collection centres

To aggregate

volumes of

crop produce

for ease

marketing

5 Plans and BQ preparation

EIA

Tendering

Construction

Inspection

Commissioning

Payment

2,000,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Collection of

farm

produce will

be easier to

the markets

Establishment of

cottage industries

To enhance

value

addition of

farm produce

to increase

farmer’s

Cashewnut,

sim sim

and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups making

crop products

Make products

2,250,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Value

addition will

improve

shelf life of

farm

produce


173


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

income

Agricultural

sector support

To transform

agricultural

production

into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Cashewnut

VCAs

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and

improvement,

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

2,800,00

0

LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Climate Smart

Agriculture

To increase

crop

productivity

and enhance

resilience to

climate

change risk

CIGs and

VMGs,

Vulnerable

and

marginalize

d groups,

common

interest

groups

Climate risk, Climate

profile development, water-

harvesting, drought

resistant crops, kitchen

gardens, food security

assessments, CIG and

VMGs micro projects,

agro-forestry.

26.65M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Livestock Sub Sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Livestock feed

strategic researve

To build

pastoralists

resilience
and end

drought

emergencies

Support 1

Pasture CIG

Construction of a hay ban

and fencing of 500 acres

of natural pasture for
harvesting and balling,

Purchase of seeds and

equipment ,

20M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,
KCSAP,

2018 -

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and
Cooperative

development


Dairy value chain

improvement

project

Increase

milk

production

2 dairy bull

camp, 1

husbandry

Purchase 30 Jersey Dairy

Bulls and distribute to 3

Community Groups

5M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and


174


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

training,Milk

value chain

supported.

KCSAP, Cooperative

development

Indigenous

Chicken

improvement

project

Increase

Indigenous

Chicken

production

Support 5

community

groups on

indigenous

chicken.

Construct 5 indigenous

model poultry houses and

relevant equipment

10 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Beekeeping

Improvements


Increase

production

of honey,

wax,pollen,v

enom,

Support 2

groups

Purchase of 1000 Modern

Bee Hive

5

Millions

LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Auction Ring Increase

access to

market and

increase

household

income of

both the

pastoralists

and

agropastorali

sts

Support the

establishment

of 1 Auction

ring and crush

Construction of 1

Livestock Auction Ring

3 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Construction of

honey processing

plant

Improve

honey

quality

1 honey

processing

plant

Construction and

equipping of 1 honey

processing Plant

15 M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Construction of

water trough

Improve

water access

4 water tough Construction of 2

Livestock water troughs

1M LCG,

RPLRP,ND

2018 -

2022

Department of

Fisheries,


175


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

to livestock MA,FAO,

KCSAP

Lands,


Livestock and

Cooperative

development

Support groups

with Beekeeping

Equipment and

Accessories

Provide

alternative

livelihood

community

groups

5 groups Purchase of 1000

Beehives, 500 beehive

harvesting suits and other

assorted accessories,

Trainings, Processing

honey,

Sitting, fencing of apiary

sites.

10Millio

n

LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP

Lands,

2018 -

2022

Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Veterinary Subsector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Construction

and/or

Refurbishment

of Offices

Improved

service

delivery

1 office

constructed

and fenced

Construction and fencing

one office

4.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Office

furniture and

equipments

purchased

Purchase of office

furniture and equipments

and equipments

1.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal Reduce

outbreaks of

151,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

Livestock vaccination 12.2M CGL 2018- CGL


176


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

Disease control trade

sensitive

diseases

poultry

vaccinated

2022

2 Livestock

movement

control points

established

Establish 2 Livestock

movement control point

0.4M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary

Clinical services

Improved

livestock

health

151,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry treated

Purchase of veterinary

drugs and supplies

7.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal Disease

Vector Control

Reduce

prevalence

of animal

vector-borne

diseases

Construction

of 1 cattle dip

Construction of cattle dip 3M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

12,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

purchased

Purchase of 12,000

Trypanocidal drugs

1.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

12,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

purchased

Purchase of 12,000

Trypanocidal drugs

9.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1000 Tsetse

traps & targets

purchased and

Purchase and installation

of 1,000 tsetse traps &

targets

1.8M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


177


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementin

g Agency

Remarks

installed

Trainings 8 Farmers’ group

trainings on tsetse control

3.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

4 Staff trainings on tsetse

control

0.6M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary Public

Health

To safeguard

human and

animal

health

1 Slaughter

house

established

Construction of slaughter

house

4.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


Fisheries Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Establishment of

feed production

system

(pelletizer)

To enhance

farmed fish

production,

food security

1 Fish feed production is

integral in

aqua/mariculture. To

support fish farming,

fundamental facilities

such as feed production

plants will be established

at strategic locations

5M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department of

Fisheries


178


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

engines

To support

fishing

operations

and increase

fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is necessary.

Fishing gears will be

procured and distributed

to fisher folks through

the BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

3M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department of

Fisheries


Development

fisheries resource

and demo centre

To support

fishing

operation

1 Fisheries resource centre

will entail construction

of facility that will be

key for training

fishers/farmers of topical

issues of fisheries

interest. It will have

conference rooms, board

rooms and cafeteria.

30M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department of

Fisheries


Lands Sub-sector

Project

Name/Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Renovation of To improve 50 Refurbishment 120M CGL FY CGL


179


Project

Name/Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

existing

government

houses in

Mokowe,

Bargoni and

Hindi

quality of

houses in

the County

units 2018/20

19-FY

2021/20

22

Ministry of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND

Construction of

new residential

houses in

Mokowe

To increase

the number

of quality

housing in

the county

30 units Design and

documentation,

procurement and

construction

210M CGL FY

2018/20

19-FY

2021/20

22

CGL

Ministry of

Housing

National

Housing

Cooperation

LAPFUND


Projects Earmarked for Mkomani Ward projects

Agriculture Sub-sector


Project Name/Location Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Extension Advisory Services To improve

adoption of

new

farming

technologies

100 Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

3.3M LCG 5

years

Department of

Agriculture


On-farm irrigation To put more

land under

irrigation

1 Irrigation

projects

Identify project area,

Design the project,

Survey the project

area,

4M LCG 2020 Department of

Agriculture


180


Project Name/Location Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

Lay out the irrigation

system, train

irrigation farmers

Farm inputs access To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials by

resource

poor

farmers

30 tons

(maize

seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and

green

grams)10

surveillance

visits

Acquisition of seeds

from Kenya seeds

company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers,

Trainings held on

effective use of farm

inputs, Farm inputs

surveillance

7M LCG 5

years

Department of

Agriculture


Coconut rehabilitation and

expansion
to expand

coconut

orchards

100,000

seedlings
Acquisition of

coconut seedlings

Distribute seedlings

to the recruited

farmers

10M LCG 5

years

Department of

Agriculture


Pest and disease control To reduce

crop

produce

losses

1 army

worm

trap,24

liters

pesticide, 2

ULV

sprayer

Install army worm

traps, Train and equip

spraying gangs, stock

emergency pesticides

reserves to combat

any notifiable pest

infestation, Train on

safe use

3M LCG 5

years

Department of

Agriculture


Establishment of cottage

industries

To enhance

value

addition of

Cashewnut,

sim sim and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups

2.25M LCG 5

years

Department of

Agriculture

Value

addition

will


181


Project Name/Location Objectives Targets Description of

Activities

Cost in

Million

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

Remarks

farm

produce to

increase

farmer’s

income

making crop products

Make products

improve

shelf life

of farm

produce


Livestock Production Sub-sector


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Dairy value chain

improvement project

Increase

milk

production

1 dairy bull

camp, 1

husbandry

training, Milk

value chain

supported.

Purchase 30 Jersey Dairy

Bulls and distribute to 3

Community Groups

10 M LCG,

RPLRP,N

DMA,FA

O,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development

Donkey improvement

project

Improve

donkey

breeding

and

upgrading

Support 50

Community

Donkey

Stallion

camp, 2

husbandry

trainings

Establish 100 Donkey

stallions.

10 M LCG,

RPLRP,N

DMA,FA

O,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Livestock

production

Support groups with
Beekeeping Equipment

and Accessories

Provide
alternative

livelihood

community

groups

5 groups Purchase of 1000
Beehives, 500 beehive

harvesting suits and other

assorted accessories,

Trainings, Processing

honey,

10M LCG,
RPLRP,N

DMA,FA

O,

KCSAP

Lands,

2018 – 2022 Department of
Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development


182


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Sitting, fencing of apiary

sites. .

Kuchi Conservation

Programme

Increase

Kuchi

production

and

consuption

Support 50

Kuchi

Breeding

groups

Purchase of 2000 Kuchi

Breeding Cocks

25

Millions

LCG,

RPLRP,N

DMA,FA

O,

KCSAP

Lands,

2018 – 2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development


Veterinary Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

Animal

Disease control

Reduce

outbreaks

of trade

sensitive

diseases

10,000 cattle,

sheep, goats

& poultry

vaccinated

Livestock vaccination


3M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Veterinary Clinical

services

Improved

livestock

health

10,000 cattle,

sheep, goats

& poultry

Purchase of veterinary

drugs and supplies

2.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal Disease Vector

Control

Reduce

prevalence

of animal

vector-

borne

diseases

1 dip

refurbished

Refurbishment of 1 cattle

dip

1.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

10,000

Trypanocidal

Purchase of 10,000

Trypanocidal drugs

1.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


183


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

drugs

purchased

1,000 litres

vector

control

pesticides

purchased

Purchase of 1,000 litres

vector control pesticides

4.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1 Crush pen

constructed

Construction of crush pen 2.4M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

2 Farmers’

group trained

on tsetse

control

2 Farmers’ group

trainings on tsetse control

0.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


Fisheries Subsector

Project Name/Location Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

Fishing capacity

improvement – provision

of modern fishing

technology (GPS, fish

finders, compasses)

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is

necessary. Fishing

gears will be procured

and distributed to fisher

folks through the

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

5M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department of

Fisheries


184


Project Name/Location Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

Fishing capacity

improvement – provision

of engines

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is

necessary. Fishing

gears will be procured

and distributed to fisher

folks through the

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

15M LCG 1 – 5

years

Department of

Fisheries

Land Subsector

1. Preparation of Amu

Old Town Integrated

urban Development Plan

A long term

framework to

guide the growth

& development

of the Old town

Amu Old

town

Structure

Zoning

regulations

Investment

strategy

Environme

ntal

protection

& transport

strategy

• Advertisement for
consultancy

• Stakeholder
consultations

• Basemap
preparation &

planning

• Plan formulation

• Draft plan
presentation &

Advertisement

• Approval &
publication

35M CGL

MOL

FY

2018/201

9-FY

2021/202

2

CGL

NMK

2. Revocation of illegal

titles in Matondoni

Farms & regularization

of the same

To secure land

tenure

400 title

deeds
• Revocation of

illegally allocated

farm plots

• Stakeholder
consultations

8M CGL

MOL

FY

2018/201

9

CGL

MOL

NLC


185


Project Name/Location Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

• Planning, survey &
demarcation

• Beneficiary
identification

• Title deed issuance

3. Regularization of

Kipungani farms

To secure land

tenure

200 title

deeds
• Stakeholder

consultations

• Planning, survey &
demarcation

• Beneficiary
identification

• Title deed issuance

7M CGL

MOL

FY

2018/201

9-FY

2021/202

2

CGL

MOL

NLC

3. Regularization of

squatters on private &

public land

To secure land

tenure

200 title

deeds
• Stakeholder

consultations

• Planning, survey &
demarcation

• Beneficiary
identification

• Title deed issuance

20M CGL

MOL

FY

2018/201

9-FY

2021/202

2

CGL

MOL

NLC


Shella Ward projects

Agriculture Sub-sector


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Extension

Advisory Services

To improve

adoption of new

farming

technologies

200 Field days,

Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

3.3M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


186


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

On-farm irrigation To put more

land under

irrigation

1

Irrigation

projects

Identify project

area,

Design the project,

Survey the project

area,

Lay out the

irrigation system,

train irrigation

farmers

4M LCG 2019

and

2020

Department of

Agriculture

Farm inputs

access
To improve

access to

quality planting

materials by

resource poor

farmers

30 tons

(maize

seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and

green

grams)10

surveillan

ce visits

Acquisition of

seeds from Kenya

seeds company

Train farmers on

crop husbandry

Distribute seeds to

the recruited

farmers, Trainings

held on effective

use of farm inputs,

Farm inputs

surveillance

7M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Pest and disease

control
To reduce crop

produce losses

1 army

worm

trap,24

liters

pesticide,

2 ULV

sprayer

Install army worm

traps, Train and

equip spraying

gangs, stock

emergency

pesticides reserves

to combat any

notifiable pest

infestation, Train

on safe use

3M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Coconut to expand 50,000 Acquisition of 5M LCG 5 years Department of


187


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

rehabilitation and

expansion

coconut

orchards

seedlings coconut seedlings

Distribute seedlings

to the recruited

farmers

Agriculture

Establishment of

cottage industries

To enhance

value addition

of farm produce

to increase

farmer’s

income

Cashewnu

t, sim sim

and

coconut

Formation of

groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups

making crop

products

Make products

2.25M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Value addition will

improve shelf life of

farm produce

Agricultural sector

support

To transform

agricultural

production into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Cashewnu

t VCA

Cashewnut value

chain rehabilitation

and improvement,

Strengthening of

VCAs

entrepreneurial

skills, cashew nut

commercialization

2.8M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


Livestock Production Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

Dairy value chain

improvement

project

Increase milk

production

3 Dairy Bull

camp, 1

husbandry
training, Milk

value chain

supported.

Purchase 30

Jersey Dairy

Bulls and
distribute to 3

Community

Groups.

5 Million LCG,

RPLRP,NDMA

,FAO, KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative
development

Galla Goats Increase Meat Support 3 Purchase 400 6 Million LCG, 2018- Department of


188


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

improvement

project

goats

production

Community

buck camp, 2

husbandry

training

Galla Bucks

from Gicheha

farm for

upgrading the

existing geen

pool

RPLRP,NDMA

,FAO, KCSAP,

2022 Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development

Indigenous

Chicken

improvement

project

Increase

Indigenous

Chicken

production

Support 5

community

groups on

indigenous

chicken.

Construct 5

indigenous

model poultry

houses and

relevant

equipment

10 Million LCG,

RPLRP,NDMA

,FAO, KCSAP,

2018-

2022

Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development


Veterinary Sub-sector


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

Construction

and/or

Refurbishment of

Offices

Improved

service delivery

1 office

Constructed


Construction

and fencing one

office


4.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Office

furniture and

equipments

purchased

Purchase of

office furniture

and equipments

1.0M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal

Disease control

Reduce

outbreaks of

trade sensitive

diseases

10,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

vaccinated

Livestock

vaccination


2.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


189


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing Agency

Veterinary

Clinical services

Improved

livestock health

10,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

Purchase of

veterinary

drugs and

supplies

2.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

Animal Disease

Vector Control

Reduce

prevalence of

animal vector-

borne diseases

10 livestock

spray pumps

purchased

Purchase of 10

livestock spray

pumps

2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

5,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

purchased

Purchase of

5,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

0.5M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

200 litres

vector control

pesticides

purchased

Purchase of

200 litres

vector control

pesticides

0.9M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

1 Crush pens

constructed

Construction of

1 crush pen

1.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

100 tsetse

traps & targets

purchased and

installed

Purchase and

installation of

100 tsetse traps

& targets

1.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

3 Farmers’

group trained

on tsetse

control

3 Farmers’

group trainings

on tsetse

control

1.2M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL

4 Staff trained

on tsetse

control

4 Staff

trainings on

tsetse control

0.6M CGL 2018-

2022

CGL


190


191


Fisheries Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

modern fishing

technology (GPS,

fish finders,

compasses)

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore

fishing grounds,

adoption of modern

fishing aid /

technology is

necessary. Fishing

gears will be

procured and

distributed to fisher

folks through the

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

1M LCG 1 - 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

engines

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore

fishing grounds,

adoption of modern

fishing aid /

technology is

necessary. Fishing

gears will be

procured and

distributed to fisher

folks through the

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives

4M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Lands Sub-sector

Regularization and To secure land 900 • Review & 8M CGL FY CGL


192


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Review of title

deeds in Manda

Maweni, Kihobe &

Mararani villages

tenure benefici

aries

Revocation of

illegally allocated

farm plots by

NLC

• Stakeholder
consultations

• Planning, survey
& demarcation

• Beneficiary
identification

• Title deed
issuance

MOL


2018/2019 MOL

NLC


Faza Ward projects

Agriculture Sub-sector


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Extension Advisory

Services

To improve

adoption of

new farming

technologies

1,500

farmers

Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

10M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Farm Tractor

service

Open up more

land for crop

production

2

Tractors

, 2 disc

plough
and a

trailer

operatio

nal

1 more

Ploughing

services/acre at Ksh

2,000, produce

transport service at
Ksh 250/km,

maintenance of

existing fleet

Quotations will be

raised to buy a

7M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


193


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

trailer

for

barani to

be

bought

planter and a sheller

On-farm irrigation To put more

land under

irrigation

1

Irrigatio

n

projects

Identify project area,

Design the project,

Survey the project

area,

Lay out the irrigation

system, train

irrigation farmers

2M LCG 2022 Department of

Agriculture

Farm inputs access To improve

access to

quality

planting

materials by

resource poor

farmers

30 tons

(maize

seeds,

NERIC

A seeds,

cow

peas and

green

grams)1

0

surveilla

nce

visits

Requisition of seeds

from Kenya seeds

company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to

the recruited farmers

8.6M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Coconut

rehabilitation and

expansion

to expand
coconut

orchards

50,000

seedling

s

Requisition of
coconut seedlings

Distribute seedlings

to the recruited

farmers

5M LCG 5 years Department of
Agriculture

Pest and disease

control
To reduce

crop produce

1 army

worm
Install army worm

traps, Train and equip

3M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


194


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

losses trap,24

liters

pesticid

e, 2

ULV

sprayer

spraying gangs, stock

emergency pesticides

reserves to combat

any notifiable pest

infestation, Train on

safe use

Construction of

grain storage

facilities

To reduce post

harvest losses

1 Site identification,

farmer groups

mobilization, design

and BoQ

development,

tendering and award

of contract,

construction,

production

5M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Establishment of

cottage industries

To enhance

value addition

of farm

produce to

increase

farmer’s

income

Cashew

nut, sim

sim and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups

making crop products

Make products

2.25M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Climate Smart

Agriculture

To increase

crop

productivity

and enhance

resilience to

climate

change risk

CIGs

and

VMGs,

Vulnera

ble and

margina

lized

groups,

common

interest

Climate risk, Climate

profile development,

water-harvesting,

drought resistant

crops, kitchen

gardens, food

security assessments,

CIG and VMGs

micro projects, agro-

forestry.

26,650,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


195


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

groups


Livestock Production Sub-sector


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Donkey

improvement

project

Improve

donkey

breeding and

upgrading

Support

50

Commu

nity

Donkey

Stallion

camp, 2

husband

ry

trainings

Establish 100 Donkey

stallions.

10 Million LCG,

RPLRP,NDMA

,FAO, KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development

Dairy value chain

improvement

project

Increase milk

production

2 dairy

bull

camp,

Milk

value

addition

group

supporte

d

Purchase 30 Jersey

Dairy Bulls and

distribute to 3

Community Groups

10 Million Lamu county

Government

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development

Kuchi Conservation

Programme

Increase

Kuchi

production

and

Support

50

Kuchi

breeder

Purchase of 2000

Kuchi Breeding

Cocks

25 Millions LCG,

RPLRP,NDMA

,FAO, KCSAP

Lands,

2018 – 2022 Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative


196


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

consumption groups development


Support groups

with Beekeeping

Equipment and

Accessories

Provide

alternative

livelihood

community

groups

5 groups Procurement of

Beehives, beehive

harvesting suits and

other assorted

accessories,

Trainings, Processing

honey,

Sitting, fencing.

10Million LCG,

RPLRP,NDMA

,FAO, KCSAP

Lands,

2018 – 2022 Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development


Veterinary Sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Construction and/or

Refurbishment of

Offices

Improved

service

delivery

1 office and

fence

constructed

Construction

and fencing one

office

6.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Office

furniture and

equipments

purchased

Purchase of

office furniture

and equipments

and equipments

1.0M CGL 2018-2022

Animal

Disease control

Reduce

outbreaks of

trade sensitive

diseases

100,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

vaccinated

Livestock

vaccination


5M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

3 points of

livestock

Establish

Livestock

0.6M CGL 2018-2022


197


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

movement

control

movement

control point

Veterinary Clinical

services

Improved

livestock

health

100,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

Purchase of

veterinary

drugs and

supplies

5M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Animal Disease

Vector Control

Reduce

prevalence of

animal vector-

borne diseases

1 dip

constructed

Construction of

1 cattle dip

2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

60 livestock

spray pumps

purchased

Purchase of 60

livestock spray

pumps

12M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

20,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

purchased

Purchase of

20,000

Trypanocidal

drugs

2.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

1000 litres

vector control

pesticides

purchased

Purchase of

1000 litres

vector control

pesticides

4.5M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

3 Crush pens

constructed

Construction of

3 crush pen

3.6M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

1200 Tsetse

traps & targets

purchased and

Purchase and

installation of

1,200 tsetse

1.8M CGL 2018-2022 CGL


198


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development

of Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

installed traps & targets

8 Farmers’

group trained

on tsetse

control

8 Farmers’

group trainings

on tsetse

control

3.2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

4 Staff trained

on tsetse

control

4 Staff

trainings on

tsetse control

0.6M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Veterinary Public

Health

To safeguard

human and

animal health

4 Slaughter

slabs

established

Construction of

4 slaughter

slabs

8.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL


Fisheries Sub-sector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Establishment of

seed production

system (fish

hatchery)

To enhance

farmed fish

production,

food security

1 Fish seed production is

integral in

aqua/mariculture. To

support fish farming,

fundamental facilities

such as fish hatchery

will be established

5M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Seaweed culture To provide

alternative

source of

livelihood to

fisher

communities

7 acres Seaweed culture entails

farming of seaweed in

the sea. 7 acres of sea

space will be farmed.

3M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries


199


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

modern fishing

technology (GPS,

fish finders,

compasses)

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is

necessary.

5M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

engines

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is

necessary.

6M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Lands Sub-sector

1. Preparation of

Faza Town

Integrated urban

Development Plan

A long term

framework to

guide the

growth &

development

of Faza town

Faza

town

Structure

Zoning

regulatio

ns

Investme

nt

strategy

Environ

mental

protectio

n &

transport

strategy

Advertisement for

consultancy

Stakeholder

consultations

Basemap preparation &

planning

Plan formulation

Draft plan presentation

& Advertisement

Approval &

publication

35M CGL

MOL

Ministry of

transport &

Urban

Development

FY

2018/2019-

FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

transport & Urban

Development

2. Regularization,

planning & survey

To formalize

& secure land

800 title

deeds

Stakeholder

consultations

80M CGL

MOL

FY

2018/2019-

CGL

MOL


200


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions (KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

of all Market

centres, farms &

villages including:

Bahamis, Pate

village, Siyu

village, Vumbe

farms, Kizingitini

farms

tenure Planning, survey &

demarcation

Beneficiary

identification

Title deed issuance

FY

2021/2022

NLC


Kiunga Ward projects

Agriculture Subsector

Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

Extension Advisory

Services

To improve

adoption of

new farming

technologies

300

farmers

Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

6,600,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Farm Tractor

service

Open up more

land for crop

production

1

Tractors

and 1

disc

ploughs

operation

al

Ploughing

services/acre at Ksh

2,000, produce

transport service at Ksh

250/km, maintenance

of existing fleet

Quotations will be

raised to buy a planter

and a sheller

3,000,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Farm inputs access To improve

access to

quality

planting

30 tons

(maize

seeds,

NERICA

Requisition of seeds

from Kenya seeds

company

Train farmers on crop

7,600,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


201


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

materials by

resource poor

farmers

seeds,

cow peas

and green

grams)10

surveilla

nce visits

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

Pest and disease

control
To reduce

crop produce

losses

1 army

worm

trap,24

liters

pesticide,

2 ULV

sprayer

Install army worm

traps, Train and equip

spraying gangs, stock

emergency pesticides

reserves to combat any

notifiable pest

infestation, Train on

safe use

3M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Construction of

grain storage

facilities

To reduce post

harvest losses

1 Site identification,

farmer groups

mobilization, design

and BoQ development,

tendering and award of

contract, construction,

production

5M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Establishment of

cottage industries

To enhance

value addition

of farm

produce to
increase

farmer’s

income

Cashewn

ut, sim

sim and

coconut

Formation of groups

Training of groups

Tour the groups

making crop products
Make products

2.25M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Agricultural sector

support

To transform

agricultural

production

Cashew

nut VCA

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and

improvement,

2,.8M LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture


202


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

into

commercially

oriented

enterprises

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

Climate Smart

Agriculture

To increase

crop

productivity

and enhance

resilience to

climate

change risk

CIGs and

VMGs,

Vulnerab

le and

marginali

zed

groups,

common

interest

groups

Climate risk, Climate

profile development,

water-harvesting,

drought resistant crops,

kitchen gardens, food

security assessments,

CIG and VMGs micro

projects, agro-forestry.

26,650,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Livestock Sub-sector

Beef Cattle

improvement

project

Increase Beef

production

Support 3

Commun

ity Beef

bull

camp, 2

husbandr

y training

Procure 30 Beef bull

and

Distribute to 3

Community groups.

6 Million LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development

Galla Goats

improvement

project

Increase Meat

goats

production

Support

10

Commun

ity buck

camp, 2

husbandr

y training

Purchase 400 Galla

Bucks from Gicheha

farm for upgrading the

existing geen pool .

5 Million LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development

Indigenous Chicken

improvement

Increase

Indigenous

Support 5

communi

Construct 5 indigenous

model poultry houses

10 Million LCG,

RPLRP,ND

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock


203


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

project Chicken

production

ty groups

on

indigeno

us

chicken.

and relevant equipment MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

and Cooperative

development

Beekeeping

Improvements

Increase

production of

honey, wax,

pollen, venom,

Support 2

groups

Purchase of 1000

Modern Bee Hive

5 Millions LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development

Fisheries

Seaweed culture To provide

alternative

source of

livelihood to

fisher

communities

7 acres Seaweed culture entails

farming of seaweed in

the sea. 7 acres of sea

space will be farmed.

2M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Landing site

development

To enhance

fishing

operations

1 A modern landing site

with all necessary

facilities (toilets,

offices, potable water,

perimeter fence,

constructed.

5M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Ice plant To support

fishing

operations and

reduce post-

harvest loss

1 An ice plant is essential

in Kiunga as the

nearest ice plant is

situated in Amu. Due

to distance fishers and

fish traders often incur

huge operation cost

and post-harvest losses

10M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Fishing capacity To support Various In order for fishers to 5M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of


204


Project

Name/Location

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

improvement –

provision of

modern fishing

technology (GPS,

fish finders,

compasses)

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is

necessary.

Fisheries

Fishing capacity

improvement –

provision of

engines

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production

and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is

necessary.

7M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Lands Sub-sector

Installation of

streetlights in Ndau,

Kiwayu, Rubu,

Mwambore,

Ishakani, Kiunga,

Mkokoni

To improve

security in the

village

8

streetligh

ts at

Strategic

places

Erection of streetlights 28M CGL FY 2018/2019-FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing


Renovation of

existing

government houses

in Kizingitini, Faza

To improve

quality of

houses in the

County

8

units

Refurbishment 12M CGL FY 2018/2019-FY

2021/2022

CGL

Ministry of

Housing


Basuba Ward projects

Agriculture Sub-sector

Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency


205


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

Extension

Advisory

Services

To improve adoption of

new farming

technologies

200 Field days, Barazas,

Demonstrations,

agricultural shows

3,800,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Farm

Tractor

service

Open up more land for

crop production

1 Tractors

and 1 disc

ploughs

operational

1trailer to

be

purchased


Ploughing services/acre

at Ksh 2,000, produce

transport service at Ksh

250/km, maintenance

of existing fleet

Quotations will be

raised to buy a planter

and a sheller

3,000,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Farm inputs

access
To improve access to

quality planting

materials by resource

poor farmers

30 tons

(maize

seeds,

NERICA

seeds, cow

peas and

green

grams)10

surveillance

visits

Requisition of seeds

from Kenya seeds

company

Train farmers on crop

husbandry

Distribute seeds to the

recruited farmers

7,600,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Pest and

disease

control

To reduce crop produce

losses

1 army

worm

trap,24

liters

pesticide, 2

ULV

sprayer

Install army worm

traps, Train and equip

spraying gangs, stock

emergency pesticides

reserves to combat any

notifiable pest

infestation, Train on

safe use

3,000,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Establishme To enhance value Cashewnut, Formation of groups 2,250,000 LCG 5 years Department of


206


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

nt of cottage

industries

addition of farm

produce to increase

farmer’s income

sim sim and

coconut

Training of groups

Tour the groups

making crop products

Make products

Agriculture

Agricultural

sector

support

To transform

agricultural production

into commercially

oriented enterprises

Cashewnut

VCA

Cashewnut value chain

rehabilitation and

improvement,

Strengthening of VCAs

entrepreneurial skills,

cashew nut

commercialization

2,800,000 LCG 5 years Department of

Agriculture

Livestock Production Sub-sector

Galla Goats

improvemen

t project

Increase

Meat goats

production

Support 5

Commun

ity buck

camp, 2

husbandr

y training

Purchase 400 Galla Bucks from

Gicheha farm for upgrading the

existing gene pool

6 Million LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development


Beekeeping

Improvemen

ts

Increase

production

of honey,

wax, pollen,

venom,

Support 2

groups

Purchase of 1000 Modern Bee Hive 5

Millions

LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development


Indigenous

Chicken

improvemen

t project


Increase

Indigenous

Chicken

production

Support 5

communi

ty groups

on

indigeno

us

chicken.

Construct 5 indigenous model poultry

houses and relevant equipment

10 Million LCG,

RPLRP,ND

MA,FAO,

KCSAP,

2018-2022 Department of

Fisheries, Livestock

and Cooperative

development


207


208


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

Veterinary Sub-sector


Animal

Disease

control

Reduce

outbreaks of

trade sensitive

diseases

25,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

vaccinated

Livestock vaccination


1.1 CGL 2018-2022 CGL

2 Livestock

movement

control points

established

Establish Livestock

movement control point

0.3M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Veterinary

Clinical

services

Improved

livestock health

25,000 cattle,

sheep, goats &

poultry

Purchase of veterinary

drugs and supplies

1.5M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Animal

Disease

Vector

Control

Reduce

prevalence of

animal vector-

borne diseases

10 livestock

spray pumps

purchased

Purchase of 10 livestock

spray pumps

2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

3,000

Trypanocidal

drugs purchased

Purchase of 3,000

Trypanocidal drugs

0.3M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

500 litres vector

control pesticides

purchased

Purchase of 500 litres

vector control pesticides

2.2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL


209


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

1 Crush pen

constructed

Construction of 1 crush

pen

1.2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

8 Farmers’ group

trained on tsetse

control

8 Farmers’ group

trainings on tsetse control

3.2M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

4 Staff trained on

tsetse control

4 Staff trainings on tsetse

control

0.6M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Veterinary

Public

Health

To safeguard

human and

animal health

1 Slaughter slab

established

Construction of 1

slaughter slab

4.0M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Fisheries Sub-sector

Developmen

t of seaweed

farming

To provide

alternative

source of

livelihood to

fisher

communities

7 acres Seaweed culture entails

farming of seaweed in the

sea. 7 acres of sea space

will be farmed.

Feasibility studies and

mapping of potential

sites will be conducted

2M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries

Fishing

capacity

improvemen

t – provision

of engines

To support

fishing

operations and

increase fish

production and

productivity

Various In order for fishers to

exploit offshore fishing

grounds, adoption of

modern fishing aid /

technology is necessary.

Fishing gears will be

procured and distributed

to fisher folks through the

2M LCG 1 – 5 years Department of

Fisheries


210


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Target Development of

Activities

Cost in

Millions

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implementing

Agency

BMUs and Fisheries

related cooperatives


Sector Name: Land, Physical Planning, Housing & Urban Development

Programme Names: Physical Planning, Urban Development, Land Administration & Housing


Table 44: On-going projects

Project Name


Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs)

Source

of

fundin

g

Time

fram

e

Implem

enting

Agency

I) Preplanning

of Hindi Phase

II Settlement

scheme

Hindi To provide a

framework

for settlement

&

development

of urban

centres in

tandem with

the Port City

strategy

100% - An advisory

plan

- Zoning plan &

land use

guidelines

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

10,M CGL Imme

diate

CGL

Ministry

of Land

NLC

Commu

nity

II) Preliminary

Lamu Port City

Master Plan &

Investment

framework

Hindi To provide a

baseline for

preparation of

a long term

framework

100% -

Structure/Invest

ment Plan for

Port City

- Transport

CGL

LAPSSE

T

KPA

Ministry


211


Project Name


Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs)

Source

of

fundin

g

Time

fram

e

Implem

enting

Agency

III) Integrated

Transport

Infrastructure

Master Plan for

Lamu Port City

for

implementati

on of the Port

project

Strategy of Land

NLC

Commu

nity

Establishment

of Lamu

Municipality &

Town

Committees


Hindi,

Mkoma

ni,

Shella

& part

of

Basuba

ward

-Faza,

Witu,

Kiunga

&

Mpeket

oni

To form

structures,

legal

instruments

for

management

of the

designated

Municipality

100% - 1 Municipal

board


- 4 Town

Committees

100,00

0,000

CGL

Ministr

y of

Transpo

rt

Immedia
te


- 4 years

CGL
Ministry of

Transport

World Bank

NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL

-Survey of

Hindi-

Magogoni

Settlement

Scheme Phase

II

-Survey of

Hindi

Ward

To formalize

claims on

public land

/settle

landless local

community

4,000

titles


1,500

titles

Surveying &

allocation of

land

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

27M


6M

CGL


CGL

CGL

NLC
MoL


212


Project Name


Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs)

Source

of

fundin

g

Time

fram

e

Implem

enting

Agency

Mokowe Town

(Old & New)

-Survey of

Bargoni

Community

Ranch


3,000

titles


sensitive areas

9M


Commu

nity/

Private

Survey

or

Regularization

of: -

-Kiunga Old

Town

-Ishakani

village & farms

-Rubu &

Mwambore

villages &

farms

Kiunga

ward

To enhance

tenure

security


1,600

titles


500 titles


800 titles

Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

4.5M


4.5M


4.5M

4.5M

CGL CGL
NLC
MoL

Regularization

of Witu Old

Town

Witu

Ward

To enhance

security of

tenure

400 titles Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

CGL CGL
NLC
MoL

Regularization

of

-Mkunumbi

Farms

Mkunu

mbi

Ward

To enhance

tenure

security

-

3,500

titles


Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

CGL CGL
NLC

MoL


213


Project Name


Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs)

Source

of

fundin

g

Time

fram

e

Implem

enting

Agency

-Squatters on

Amu Ranch


of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

Survey of

Sinambio

Trading Centre

Hongw

e Ward

To enhance

tenure

security

500

Titles

Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

CGL CGL
NLC

MoL

Regularization

of:

-Vumbe Farms


-Pate Village

Faza

ward

To enhance

tenure

security


1,400

titles


800 titles

Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

CGL CGL
NLC

MoL

Regularization

of Kiongwe

Farms

Bahari

ward

To enhance

tenure

security

2,500

titles

Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

CGL CGL
NLC

MoL


214


Project Name


Locatio

n

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs)

Source

of

fundin

g

Time

fram

e

Implem

enting

Agency

Regularization

of

-Kipungani

village

-Wiyoni (Phase

I & II)

-Matondoni

Mkoma

ni Ward

To enhance

tenure

security


200 titles


558 titles


236 titles

Surveying,

verification of

ownership and

allocation

Preservation of

riparian, green

parks, open

spaces, protection

of water

catchment area

and ecologically

sensitive areas

CGL CGL
NLC

MoL


Table 45: New Project Proposals


Programme 1: Physical Planning

Project Name Location/W

ard

Objectives Target Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs)

Source of

funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

Preparation of

Integrated

Strategic Urban

Development

Plans

/Amu, Witu,

Mpeketoni, Hindi,

Mokowe, Kiunga,

Faza, Kizingitini

Countywide To prepare

long term

spatial

frameworks

for growth

&

developmen

t of

designated

urban areas

10 - Preparation of TORs

-Advertisements for

consultancies

-Community

sensitization

-Plan preparation,

approval &

implementation

300M CGL 2018-2022 Department of

Lands, Physical

Planning, Urban

Development &

housing


Planning of All

Market centres &

villages


Countywide To prepare

spatial

frameworks

for

60 - Preparation of TORs

-Advertisements for

consultancies

-Community

sensitization

240M CGL 2018-2022 Department of

Lands, Physical

Planning, Urban

Development

housing and


215


Programme 1: Physical Planning

Project Name Location/W

ard

Objectives Target Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs)

Source of

funding

Time

Frame

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

-Plan preparation,

approval &

implementation

Public Works

P1. Sub total 740M


Programme 2: Urban development

Project Name/

Location

Location/W

ard

Objectives Targets Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

Establishment of 4

Town Committees

in Witu,

Mpeketoni, Faza

& Kiunga

-Witu

-Mpeketoni

-Kiunga

-Faza

To form

structures,

legal

instruments

for

managemen

t of the

designated

urban areas

- 4 Town

Committee

s

- Preparation of
preliminary

boundaries

- Sensitization of the
community

- Approval by
Executive &

Assembly

- Establishment of
technical structures

120M CGL

Ministry of

transport

2018-

2022

Department of

Lands, Physical

Planning, Urban

Development &

housing


Urban

Development

Management for

Four(4) major

towns; Witu,

Mpeketoni, Faza

& Kiunga

-Witu

-Mpeketoni

-Kiunga

-Faza

To model

the KUSP

infrastructur

al support

for the

towns;


4 towns - Provide Functional
waste management

system for the

towns

- Improve Functional
water supply

system for the

towns

300M CGL 2018/20

22

CGL


216


Programme 2: Urban development

Project Name/

Location

Location/W

ard

Objectives Targets Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

- Improvements on
urban roads with

supportive

infrastructure (street

lighting, street

naming, drainage)

for the towns

P2. Sub-Total 420M


Programme 3: Housing

Project Name/ Location/

Ward

Objective

s

Targets Description of

Key Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timef

rame

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

Construction of

County Staff

houses


Mokowe,

Hindi,

Mpeketon

i, Witu,

Faza

To

provide

affordable

&

adequate

housing

for the

staff

500 units - Design &

costing

-Procurement &

construction

300M CGL

Private

Sector

Donors

Ministry

of

Housing

2018-

2022

Department of

Land, Physical

Planning &

Infrastructure


Renovation of

existing staff

houses

Countywi

de

To

improve

the

quality &

number of

staff

200 - Preparation of

BQs

-Advertisement of

tenders

-Award,

supervision &

100M CGL 2018-

2022

Department of

Land, Physical

Planning &

Infrastructure


217


Programme 3: Housing

Project Name/ Location/

Ward

Objective

s

Targets Description of

Key Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timef

rame

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

houses implementation

Construction of

New Governors

residence

To

provide

official

residence

for the

governor

and the

Deputy

governor

1 official

residence
- Design and

costing

- Construction
- supervision
- Maintenance


150M CGL 2018/2

019

County

Executive


P3. Sub total 450M


Programme 4: Land Administration

Project Name/ Location/W

ard

Objectives Targets Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

Regularization of

all squatters in

private & public

land

Countywide To

formalize

interests/cla

ims on both

private &

public land

- 80

villages

-80 Farms

- 25,000

titles

-Preparation of TORs

-Procurement &

Award

-Sensitization of the

community

-planning, survey &

approvals by

Executive &

Assembly

-Registration & title

preparation

800M CGL

MOL

NLC

2018-

2022

CGL

MOL

NLC


Regularization of

all community

Countywide To secure

all the

10

community

-Preparation of TORs

-Procurement &

300M CGL

MOL

2018-

2021

CGL

MOL


218


Programme 4: Land Administration

Project Name/ Location/W

ard

Objectives Targets Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

ranches:

-Amu Ranch

-Witu Nyongoro

-Witu Cooperative

-Mokowe

Kibokoni

-Pandanguo

-Boni Community

community

ranches

ranches Award

-Sensitization of the

community

-planning, survey &

approvals by

Executive &

Assembly

-Registration & title

preparation

NLC NLC

Regularization of

all planned Towns

& Market centres

Countywide To

formalize

the interests

both public

& private

within the

planned

towns &

market

centres

-50 Market

centres

-20

Townships

-Preparation of TORs

-Procurement &

Award

-Sensitization of the

community

- survey,

identification of

beneficiaries

approvals by

Executive &

Assembly

-Registration & title

preparation

400M CGL

MOL

NLC

2018-

2022

CGL

MOL

NLC


Survey of all

public utilities

Countywide To secure

all the pubic

utilities

500 public

utilities

-Preparation of TORs

-Procurement &

Award

- survey,

identification of

beneficiaries

approvals by

Executive &

Assembly

-Registration & title

preparation

100M CGL

MOL

NLC

2018-

2022

CGL

MOL

NLC


219


Programme 4: Land Administration

Project Name/ Location/W

ard

Objectives Targets Description of Key

Activities

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Remar

ks

P4. Sub total 1.6B


220


Table 46: Stalled Projects

Project Name


Location Description of activities Reasons for stalling

Planning & survey of Hindi

Phase II Settlement Scheme

Hindi Preparation of Advisory plan for

16,000 acres

Survey & beaconing of parcels

Identification of beneficiaries

• Invasion of the planning area by
squatters/speculators

• Need for consensus among the
community and CGL on

replanning of the area

• Need to ensure the advisory plan
complies with the long term

vision of the Port City and

Lapsset project

Planning & survey of Awer

community land in Basuba Ward

Basuba Sensitization of the community

Reconnaissance survey & basemap

preparation

Visioning & SWOT analysis

Scenario Building & Draft plan

preparation

Approval and implementation

• Gazettment of the planning area
as part of the Boni Dodori

National Reserve

• Lack of consensus among the
community members

• Insecurity/sporadic attacks along
Milimani-Kiunga Road

Regularization of Community

ranches

Witu, Mokowe,

Hindi, Mkunumbi

Sensitization of the community

Identification of boundaries & interests

Replanning & survey

Registration & issuance of titles

• Inadequate funds

• Lack of consensus among the
ranch owners & squatters


221


Infrastructure And Ict

Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

A7 Junction-

Hindi rd

To preserve

the existing

transport

assets

2.39km Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread and

compact gravel equipment.

Excavate in soft material for

culverts.

2,615,057 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

A7 Junction –

Sinambio rd

Improve

connectivity

6.53km Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread and

compact gravel equipment Light

bush clearing. culvert installation

600mm with surround

3,514,975 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Bahari sec –

Bahari Town

road

Enhance

lifespan of the

infrastructure

13.79km Light bush clearing. culvert

installation 600mm with surround.

Excavate in soft material for culvert.

Carriageway grading -light grading

3,515,218 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Faza –

Kizingitini rd

To enhance

the quality and

usability of the

roads.

7.24km Light bush clearing. culvert

installation 600mm with surround.

Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread and

compact gravel equipment.

3,515,268 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure


222


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Hindi –Jipe rd 8.71km Headwall construction concrete.

Excavate in soft material for culvert.

2,657,658 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Hindi

magogoni –

Hindi rd

9.13km Light bush clearing. Culvert

installation 600mm with surround.

Excavate in soft material for culvert.

3,504,670 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

L.Kenyatta –

Mangu ECD

rd

11.12km Light bush clearing. culvert

installation 600mm with surround.

Excavate in soft material for culvert.

3,515,260 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Mkunguni

ECD – Bora

rd

3.24km Headwall construction concrete.

Culvert installation 600mm with

surround. Excavate in soft material

for culvert.

2,504,051 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Moa –

Chalaluma rd

7.53km Headwall construction concrete.

Culvert installation 600mm with

surround. Excavate in soft material

for culvert. Carriageway grading -

light grading

50,175,869 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Ndeu ECD –

Hindi rd 1

3.89km Light bush clearing. culvert

installation 600mm with surround.

Heavy grading with watering and

compaction.

3,060,272 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure


223


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Ndeu ECD –

Hindi rd 2

3.55km Light bush clearing. culvert

installation 600mm with surround.

Heavy grading with watering and

compaction. Excavate in soft

material for culvert.

3,105,795 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Roka kibiboni

ECD – Hindi

magogoni rd

17.72km Headwall construction concrete.

Culvert installation 600mm with

surround. Excavate in soft material

for culvert. Carriageway grading –

light grading.

3,905,278 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Sendemke –

Witurd

4.13km Light bush clearing. Heavy grading

with watering and compaction.

Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread and

compact gravel equipment

2,845,249 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Sikomani –

Uziward

5.16km Headwall construction concrete.

Culvert installation 600mm with

surround. Excavate in soft material

for culvert. Carriageway grading –

light grading.

2,959,278 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure

Tabasamu rd 1.90km Headwall construction concrete.

Culvert installation 600mm with

surround. Excavate in soft material

4,268,916 LCG 2018-2022 Infrastructure


224


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

for culvert. Carriageway grading –

light grading.


Table 47: New Project Proposals

Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.

)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

WITU WARD

1. Opening up of

feeder roads at

Lumshi,Didewaride,s

endemke,moa,witu

village and

maishamasha.

Improve

connectivity

15km Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread

and compact gravel equipment.

Excavate in soft material for

culverts.

18M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Rural electrification

at

Lumshi,moa,sendemk

e.

Enable growth

of small and

micro

industries and

life standards

80

Homested

s

Rapid electricity connection 20M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

3.Street lights in

moa,soroko,wituvilla

ge,maishamasha

Light up to

improve

security and

10 street

lights in

each

Erect street lights 10M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


225


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.

)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

promote

commercial

activities

village

4. Public utility in

maishamasha

Provide access

to social and

economic

services

2 public

utilities

Construction of the public

utilities

5M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

5.Road upgrading in

Panda nguo

Routine road

maintance and

enhance

accesiblity

2km Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread

and compact gravel equipment

3M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.

)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

KIUNGA WARD

1.Rural

Electrification in

Kiwayu, Ndau,

Mkokoni

Enable growth

of small and

micro

industries and

life standards

80

Homested

s

Rapid electricity connection 15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Streetlights in

Ishakani ,Kiunga

Light up to

improve

security and

10 street

lights in

each

Erect street lights 8M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


226


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Kshs.

)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

town, promote

commercial

activities

village

3. construction of a

Jetty in

Kiwayu,KiungaTown

,Ndau and Ishakani

Enhance

efficient

docking and

transport

system

Construct

one jetty

Construction of a new jeety 20M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

4. Sea wall in

Ishakani,

Protect and

retain the land

along from

flooding and

overtopping

100m Construction of a sea wall 3.5M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

5.Pedestrian

walkways in Kiunga

Town

Enhance

efficient

walkways

1km Contstruction of pedestrian

footpaths and walkways

3M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

6.Petrol filling station

in Kiunga town.

Provide a safe

and efiicient

petroleum

supply

1 Construction of a filling station 5M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

7.Upgrading

ofKiunga –Mkokoni

road

Routine road

maintance and

enhance

accesiblity

30km Provide gravel wearing course-

excavation, free haul, spread

and compact gravel equipment

55M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

8.Solar electrification

in Ndau

Enable growth

of small and

micro

industries and

life standards

25

Homestea

ds

Rapid solar electricity

connection

6M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


227


228


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Ksh

s.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

Bahari Ward

1.Road bush clearing

Baharini,Tewa,Sikom

ani,Ngoi,

Improve

connectivity

15km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment.

15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Road mainatainace

and culverts in

baharini

Improve

connectivity

5km Excavate in soft material

for culverts.

16M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

3.Rural electrification

in

Tewa,Sikomani,Ngoi

Enable growth of

small and micro

industries and life

standards

80

homesteads

Rapid electricity

connection

15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

4.Street lights in

Bargoni,

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 street

lights

Erect street lights 5M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

5.Upgrading of Hindi

-Bargoni road

&Mpeketoniuziwa

market center and

Routine road

maintance and

enhance accesiblity

15km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

25M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


229


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Ksh

s.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

Ngoi

Hindi Ward

1.Rural electrification

in

Hongwe,Sinambio,M

sefuni,Bomani

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 street

lights

Erect street lights 5M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Expantion of rural

roads and

maintenance

Hongwe,Msefeni,

Bomani,SefuMtondon

i.

Routine road

maintance and

enhance accesiblity

20km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

35M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

3.Solar street lighting

in

Sinambio,Bomani,Sef

umtononi,Lumshi/

Amkeni

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 solar

street lights

in each

village

Erect street lights 15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

Faza Ward

1.Mtangawanda -

Kizingitini Road

upgrading

Routine road

maintance and

enhance accesiblity

20km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

35M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


230


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Ksh

s.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

2.Street lights in

Pate,Siyu

,Faza,Kizingitini,

Tchundwa,Mbwajum

wali,Shanga

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 street

lights in

each village

Erect street lights 45M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

Shella Ward

1.Upgrading of

Manda –Maweni

road

Routine road

maintance and

enhance accesiblity

16km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

20M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Construction of

Manda Airport road

Improve

connectivity

10km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment.

Excavate in soft material

for culverts.

15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

3.Street lights in

Shellavillage,Mandav

ilage

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 street

lights in

each village

Erect street lights 15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

4.Electrification

MandaMaweni

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

10 street

lights

Erect street lights 7M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


231


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Ksh

s.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

activities

5.Continuation of

shella Lamu cabro

road from

Improve

connectivity

3km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

8M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

Mkomani Ward

1.Construction of Fire

station at

Langoni,Matondoni

To manage fire

outbrakes and

deliver fire services

3 fire

stations

To safely manage fire

outbrakes

12M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Construction of a

road to connect Lamu

–Matondoni-

Kipungani

Improve

connectivity

15km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

27M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

3.Renovation of Jetty

in Lamu

Enhance efficient

docking and

transport system

Construct

one jetty

Repair broken barriers and

support barriers

20M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

4.Construction of a

road to connect

Swafaa – Kashmir-

Bombay-Kandhahar

with street lights and

pedestrian walways

Improve

connectivity

5km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

12M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


232


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Ksh

s.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

5.Street lights in

Langoni

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 street

lights

Erect street lights 15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

Mkunumbi Ward

1.Electrification in

UziwaCenter,Mpenya

,Juhudi,Marafa,Widh

o-

Mikidhuni,Panagani,

Kizuke.

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

5 street

lights in

each village

Erect street lights 12M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2.Road expansion and

upgrading and acess

in

Uziwacenter,Mapeny

a,Juhudi,Marafa,Wid

ho-

Mikiduni,Majembeni,

Pangani,Kizuke

Routine road

maintance and

enhance accesiblity

20km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

35M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

3.Street Lights at

UziwaCenter,Mapeny

a,Koreni,Majembeni,

Widho-

Mikiduni,Kizuke

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

5 street

lights in

each village

Erect street lights 13M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


233


Project

Name/Location


Objectives Targets Description of Activities Cost

(Ksh

s.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Remar

ks

Jetty.

4.Construction of new

Jetty at Kizuke.

Enhance efficient

docking and

transport system

Construct

one jetty

Construction of a new

jeety

20M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

BASUBA WARD

1. Mararani -Mangai

Road upgrading.

Routine road

maintance and

enhance accesiblity

15km Provide gravel wearing

course-excavation, free

haul, spread and compact

gravel equipment

19M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure

2. Rural

electrification. All

villages

Light up to improve

security and

promote commercial

activities

10 street

lights in

each village

Erect street lights 15M LCG 2018-2022 infrastructure


Sub Sector: County Treasuary


Project Name Location Objective Output

/Outcome

Performance

indicators

Timeframe

(Start-

End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Implementing

Agency

GIS Monitoring

and Evaluation

Systen

County

headquarters

To Provide

platform for

monitoring

and

Improved

access to

information

No of reports

generated

from the

system

June 2019-

2020

Economic

planning unit

10M Department of

finance


234


Project Name Location Objective Output

/Outcome

Performance

indicators

Timeframe

(Start-

End)

Implementing

Agencies

Cost

(Ksh.)

Implementing

Agency

evaluation

of county

development

programmes

function

OSR Mapping County

Wide

To have a

credible data

on various

county

revenue

streams

Improved

revenue for

development

projects

No of

different

streams

identified

June 2019-

2020

Revenue

department

80 M Department of

finance


Sub Sector: Trade

Project Name


Location Objectives Targets Description

of Activities

(Key

Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source

of

funding

Time

frame

Implementing

Agency

On-going projects

Majembeni market Mkunumbi

ward

Conducive

environment

for traders

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

4.5M LCG 2017/2018 Department of trade

and industrialization

Kibaoni market

development

Mkunumbi

ward

Conducive

environment

for traders

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

1,.6M LCG 2016/2017 Department of trade

and industrialization

Witu market Witu ward Conducive

environment

for traders

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

3M LCG 2017/2018 Department of trade

and industrialization

Market shade at

mokowe

Hindi

ward

Conducive

environment

4 Site visit

BQs

2M LCG 2017/2018 Department of trade

and industrialization


235


for traders Contract

Hindi market Hindi

ward

Conducive

environment

for traders

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

4,500,000 LCG 2016/2017 Department of trade

and industrialization


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Development of modern

jua kali sheds

Bahari/witu/hongwe

Mkomani(matondoni)


Conducive

environment for

traders

200 Site visit

BQs

Contract

furnishing

12M LCG 2018/2021 Department of trade

and industrialization

Boda boda shades

Bahari/witu/faza(faza &

mtangawanda)

Conducive

environment for

traders

3 Site visit

BQs

Contract

6M LCG 2018/2019 Department of trade

and industrialization

Modern retail stalls

Hindi ,mkomani

(mokowe and amu)

Conducive

environment for

traders

150 Site visit

BQs

Contract

furnishing

12M LCG 2019/2022 Department of trade

and industrialization

Majembeni Open Air

Market-Phase II

Mkunumbi ward


Conducive

environment for

traders

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

6M LCG 2019/2018 Department of trade

and industrialization

Uziwa open air

Market

Mkunumbi ward

Conducive

environment for

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

6M LCG 2019/2020 Department of trade

and industrialization

Kizingitini fish market

Faza ward

Conducive

environment for

traders

1 Site visit

BQs

Contract

3M LCG 2018/2019 Department of trade

and industrialization


236


Programme Name: INDUSTRIALIZATION

Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description

of Activities

(Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

County investment

profile (county

wide)

To create

investment

guidelines and

mapping for

potential

investors

1 TOR

Tender award


3,000,000 LCG 2019/2020 Department of

trade and

industrialization

Business

incubation centers

(bahari ward/ faza

ward)

Embrace locals

base innovations

to encourage

entrepreneurship

with equal

opportunities

2 Site visit

BQs

Contract

staffing

20,000,000 LCG 2019/2020 Department of

trade and

industrialization

Business

information center

(faza ward/hindi /

witu ward)

Provide

information to

entrepreneurs

3 Site visit

BQs

Contract

staffing

15,000,000 LCG 2019/2022 Department of

trade and

industrialization

Equipping jua kali

associations

(county wide)

Value addition

through

empowering

100 Purchase of

the equipment

Distributing to

the

associations

20,000,000 LCG 2018/2022 Department of

trade and

industrialization


237


TRADE REGULATION

Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targ

ets

Description of Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefram

e

Implementing

Agency

Purchase of

weight and

measures

equipment’s

(county

wide)

Ensuring use

of approved

weights and

measures

equipment in

trading and

ensuring

consumer

protection


2 Business Regulation and licensing


Purchase of equipment


Hiring a weights and measures

officer and support staff


Undertaking workshops


Design and publishing of

information materials


Assessment and field visits to ensure

fair trade practices


8M LCG 2019/2022 Department of

trade and

industrialization

Investment

policy and

trade act

Public

protection

from

exploitation

1 3,000,00

0

LCG 2019/2022 Department of

trade and

industrialization


238


Sub Sector: Tourism
On-going projects


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

Promotion and

Marketing of

Lamu

To promote Lamu as an

international destination of

choice

County

wide


Conducting the following

festivals:

CGL

Sponsors

Donors

Kenya

Tourism

Board

5 yrs County

Government-

Tourism dept
Lamu art festival 4M

Health and wellness

tourism

4M


Lamu food festival 10M

Lamu Culture festival 30M

Lamu Maulid festival 10M

Lamu triathlon 2M

Participating in local

Tourism fairs and

exhibition

10M

Promotion of festivals at

wards level

10M

Programme Name: Expanding, Improving And Developing Tourism Support Services And Infrastructure

Tourism

Information

Centres

Available and accessible

tourism information to all

3 -Information

dissemination

-Collection of visitor

arrivals and departure

statistics

-Equipping offices for

tourism desks

4.5M County

Governmen

t

2018/2022 County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


239


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

Rehabilitating

and renovating

tourism attraction

sites

Improving, upgrading and

maintaining the attraction

sites to more pleasing

standards

4 Rehabilitating through

painting, cleaning, fencing

attraction sites

20M CGL

-Sponsors

-donors

-Grants

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


-Tourism

stakeholders

Signage of Sites Well mapped and signage of

attraction sites done

4 Signage of all major

tourism attraction sites

6M -CGL

-Sponsors

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism

-NMK


Tourism

infrastructural

development

(access roads)

Improving the standards of

the access roads to the

attraction sites

4 Developing, maintaining

and improving the access

roads/ foot paths to

attraction sites

10M -County

governmen

t

-Sponsors

-donors

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism

-Tourism

stakeholders

-Dept. Of

infrastructure

Development of

wayside

amenities at

attraction sites

An improved and well

managed tourism destination

3 -Mapping out the various

attractions available in

each region and

developing wayside

amenities such as toilets,

resting areas at attraction

sites

30M -County

governmen

t

-Donors

-Investors

-Sponsors

2019/2021 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism

-Tourism

stakeholders

Clean up of

tourism attraction

sites

To have well maintained and

clean tourist attraction sites

County

wide

Tourism Attraction sites

clean up by tourism youth

groups once every month

10M -County

governmen

t

-sponsors

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


240


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency


-Tourism

stakeholders

Tourism

Standards

Effectively regulated and

standardized tourism

industry

12 -Conducting 4 quarterly

inspections in a year


•Liaising with TRA to

enhance the capacity of

county tourism officials

and industry players to

ensure compliance and

conformity with tourism

standards regulations as

provided under the

Tourism Act 2011 and

TRA Regulations

•Supporting the national

government in classifying

hospitality facilities and

other tourism related

tourism enterprises using

the EAC Criteria for

Standardization of Hotels,

Restaurants and Other

Tourist Accommodation

Facilities;

•Coordinating

maintenance of tourism

products and services

standards and quality

management within the

6M County

Governmen

t

2020/2022 County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


241


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

county in liaison with

relevant stakeholders;

•Liaising with the Tourism

Regulatory Authority to

ensure compliance with

the provisions and

regulations for tourism

training standards at the

county;

•Ensuring compliance with

the Building Code, Fire

Safety and Public Health

Code etc that are crucial

when grading and

classifying tourism

facilities and services

Development of

tourism legal

frameworks

To have a regulated Tourism

industry


3 Developing and

implementation of county

tourism policy, tourism

bill, sector plans, Tourism

area plans and tourism

laws and regulations

9M -CGL

-Ministry

of Tourism

2019/2021 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


-Tourism

stakeholders

Tourism capacity

building

A well trained and informed

human capital that improve

on service delivery

8 -Conducting 2 trainings

per year to ground

handlers (tour guides,

dhow operators, hoteliers)

-Conducting

Benchmarking activities to

tourism ground handlers

- Ground handlers

empowerment through

provision of uniforms,

23M CGL

-Sponsors

-donors

-Kenya

Utalii

College

-Tourism

Fund

2019/2022 County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism

-Tourism

stakeholders


242


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

badges

Youth and

women

empowerment on

tourism

development


The youth and women being

involved in the tourism

industry

450 Involving the youth in

events planning using the

youth groups and women

in product development

and value addition of

tourism products through

their women group

associations


20M -County

Governmen

t

-Sponsors

-donors

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism

-Youth dept.

-Tourism

stakeholders

Tourism

Information

Development

Well informed tourists on

Lamu as a destination

5000 Provision of tourism

information materials:

-tourism Information

guide book,

Brochures, fliers, tourism

area maps, information

billboards

10M County

Governmen

t


2019/2022 County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


Tourism

research,

information and

data management

Availability of up to date

data that can form a basis of

planning for the sector

4 -Collection, compilation

and management of local

tourism products and

services profile

information in the county;

-Developing a mechanism

and instruments for

tourism data collection,

management and reporting

within the county;

•Facilitating sharing of

county tourism data for

integration in the national

tourism statistics

management and reporting

15M -County

Governmen

t

-Sponsors

2019/2022 County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


243


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

instruments; •Ensuring

County Tourism Profile is

continuously updated;

•Conducting County

Tourism research in

liaison with relevant

stakeholders

Development of

Tourism products

(Community

based tourism)

Increasing and diversifying

the existing tourism products

County

wide

•Sensitizing local

communities

•Capacity build local

communities on

opportunities in tourism

and sustainable operation

of tourism enterprises;

•Developing funding

mechanism for the

community/village tourism

programmes and projects

at the county;

•Monitoring the

performance of

community based tourism
projects to ensure

sustainability, good

governance and equitable

sharing of benefits in

liaison with relevant

15M -County

governmen

t

-Sponsors

-donors

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism

-Tourism

stakeholders


244


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementin

g Agency

stakeholders;

•Assisting communities to

negotiate fair agreements

where either local or

foreign private investors

are involved.

Lamu Tourism

week

To synergize the input of

tourism players in improving

the tourism industry in Lamu

4 Conducting a Lamu

tourism week where all the

tourism players can

converge and share their

input in improving the

industry through expo and

exhibitions, seminars and

any relevant activities that

enlightens the Lamu

residents of the various

tourism opportunities

available and can tap into

5M County

Governmen

t

2019/2022 -County

Government-

Dept of

Tourism


-Tourism

stakeholders


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Tourism

Entertainment

program

(tourism night)

Increased entertainment

activities that retains tourists

longer in Lamu

County

wide

-CGL

-Sponsors

2019/202

2

CGL

Dept of Tourism

Stakeholders


245


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Tourism

Marketing

To market Lamu as the

international destination of

choice

County

wide

•Organizing County

Tourism and Travel

EXPO’s/fairs in

collaboration with the

national marketing

agency and other

relevant stakeholders


•Working with the

ministry and its

agencies responsible for

marketing activities to

participate in local,

national and

international tourism

events;


•Developing marketing

materials to foster

branding, destination

image and

competitiveness

•Promoting e-tourism

uptake and website

design for market

access and linkages;

•Organizing cultural

tourism events and

other themed tourism

festivals;

•Collaborating with

other counties in

50M -CGL

-Sponsors

-Donors

2019/202

2

-County

Government-Dept

of Tourism

-Tourism

stakeholders

-Kenya Tourism

Board


246


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

staging and hosting

regional tourism

festivals and events

Tourism

Documentaries

Increasing awareness of the

untapped tourism areas and

attractions by documenting

local tourism attractions,

products and investment

opportunities

28 Developing tourism

documentaries and

airing them on all

media platforms

14M -County

Governme

nt

-Sponsors

2019/202

2

-County

Government-Dept

of Tourism


Publicity of

tourism

documentaries

Increasing awareness of the

untapped tourism areas and

attractions

28 Advertising the

documentaries through

paid up Ads. On

-You tube

-Face book

-Instagram

-Tweeter

-Trip advisor

14.4M -CGL

-Sponsors

-donors

2019/202

2

-County

Government-Dept

of Tourism


-Tourism

stakeholders

Destination

Branding

Improving on the destination

brand as “Tembea Lamu-the

Island of festivals”

County

wide

Branding of Products:

Pens, books, Diaries,

Calendars, T-shirts,

Handbags, Key holders,

Walls, Dhows, Sails

15M -CGL

-Sponsors

-donors

2019/202

2

-County

Government-Dept

of Tourism


-Tourism

stakeholders

Establishment

of Tourism

stakeholder

forums

To ensure public-private

sector collaboration for

success of the tourism

Industry in Lamu

7 -Establishing tourism

stakeholder forums.

-establishing of a Lamu

Tourism Board

-engaging with the

sector specific partners

for co operation in the

development of tourism

4M -CGL

-Donors

-Sponsors

2019/202

2

-County

Government-Dept

of Tourism


-Tourism

stakeholders


247


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

facilities and circuits

-Promote

Community/village

tourism

entrepreneurship

development

Human

Resource

Development

Improved service delivery Manda

Mkomani

Shella

Man power recruitment

and training who will

be stationed at the

Information Centres


14M CGL 2019/202

2

County

Government-Dept

of Tourism

Office

Administration

Efficiency in service

delivery

Mkomani Construction of office

block, office furniture

and accessories set up.

14M CGL 2019/202

0

County

Government-Dept

of Tourism


Sub Sector: Cooperative

Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Women Sacco

Society

Empowering women and

uplift the standard of

living

To register

1 women

Cooperativ

e

Mobilization and

creating awareness

3.5m LCG,KCSA 2018-2019 Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Kiunga Ward/Hindi

Boda Boda Co-

operaives

Empowering the you

through savings

mobilization

To register

1 Boda

boda

cooperativ

Mobilization and

creating awareness

3m LCG, 1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative


248


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

e development.

Beekeeping Co-

operative

Empowering beekeepers

through savings

mobilization

To register

3 honey

harvesting

co-ps in

the 3 wards

Mobilization of

beekeepers and

creating awareness

3m LCG,KCSAP

,RPLRP

1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Faza Word

Boda Boda Co-

operative

Empowering the youth

through savings

mobilization

To register

1 boda

boda

cooperativ

e

Mobilization and

creating awareness

1.5m LCG 1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Beekeeping Co-

operative

Empowering beekeepers

through savings

mobilization

To register

1 honey

harvesting

co op

Mobilization of

beekeeping farmers

and creating

awareness

1m LCG 1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Shella/Mkomani Wards

Boat Operators

Sacco

Empowering boat

operators through

savings mobilization

1 boat

operators

cooperativ

e

Mobilization and

creating awareness

3m LCG, 1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Hindi/Bahari/Witu Wards

Boda Boda Co-

operative

Empowering the youth

through savings

mobilization

To register

1 boda

boda

cooperativ

e

Mobilization and

creating awareness

1.5m LCG 1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Beekeeping Co-

operative

Empowering beekeepers

through savings

To register

1 honey

Mobilization and

creating awareness

1m LCG, 1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,


249


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

mobilization harvesting

cooperativ

e

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Poultry Co-

operative

Empowering poultry

farmers through savings

mobilization

To register

3 poultry

farmers co-

ps in the 3

wards

Mobilization and

creating awareness

4.5m LCG,

KCSAP ,

RPLRP

1-5 years Department of

Fisheries,

Livestock and

Cooperative

development.

Total 22m


Sector: Health

Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

On-going projects

Hindi Ward

Upgrading of

Mokowe H/C

To improve

quality of health

servives

1 Renovation of existing

hospital ifrustructure

10,157,270 CGL 2018 CGL

Construction of

sanitary block and

water tower at Hindi

Magogoni disp

To improve on

infection

prevention

1 Construction of sanitary

block and water tower

4,000,000 CGL 2018/19 CGL

Witu Ward

Completion of Witu

H/C accident and

emergency unit

To cater for

emergencies

1 Completion of the A& E U 13,990,353 CGL 2018 CGL

Construction of To improve 1 Construction of radiology 4,000,000 CGL 2018 CGL


250


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

radiology unit at Witu

H/C

quality of health

servives

block

Construction of

incinerator at Witu

H/C

To improve on

infection

prevention and

control

1 Construction of incinerator

at Witu H/C

1,096,820 CGL 2018 CGL

Bahari Ward

Construction of

laundry unit at

Mpeketoni Hosp

To improve

cleanliness on

patient linen

1 Construction of laundry unit 5,000,000 CGL 2018 CGL

Completion of

perimeter fence at

Mpeketoni Hosp

To improve on

security and

prevent land

encroachment

1 Completion of Perimeter

wall

5,000,000 CGL 2018 CGL

Renovation of

Mpeketoni Hosp

(Phase 1)

To improve on

hospital

infrustructure

1 Renovation of Mpeketoni

Hospital

7,500,000 CGL 2018/19 CGL

Upgrading of

Mpeketoni Hosp

maternity complex

To improve

access to health

services

1 Construction of New

maternity block

50,000,000 National Govt 2018 CGL

Faza ward

Construction of

laundry and Kitchen

at Faza Hosp

To mprove

quality of care

2 1Laundry and kitchen

constructed

11,675.283 CGL 2018 CGL

Construction of

perimeter wall at Faza

Hosp

To enhance

security

1 Perimeter wall in place 6,788,692 CGL 2018 CGL

Extension of the

maternity and

renovations at Faza

To mprove

quality of care

1 Maternity block extended

and hosp renovations done

11,904,482 National Govt 2018 CGL


251


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

Hosp

Construction modern

H/C at Siyu

To mprove

quality of care

1 A new H/c constructed 17,473.870 CGL 2018 CGL

Construction of OPD

at Faza Hosp

To mprove

quality of care

1 OPD constructed 38,490,450 National Govt 2018 CGL

Basuba Ward

Construction of staff

house at Kiangwe

dispensary

To provide

accomodation to

staff

1 Staff house constructed 3,400,000 CGL/National

gov

2018/19 National

Gov/Equ

alization

fund

New Project Proposals

Mkunumbi ward

Construction and

equipping of

Poromoko Dispensary

and Staff house

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of health

facility and staff house

Equiping the facility

15,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Construction and

equipping of Pangani

Dispensary and staff

house

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of health

facility and staff house

Equiping the facility

15,000,000 CGL 2018-20 CGL

Construction and

equipping of Mavuno

dispensary and staff

house(Phase 2)

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of health

facility and staff house

Equiping the facility

12,000,000 CGL 2019/20 CGL

Construction of

delivery room at

Mapenya dispensary

To increase acces

to skilled birth

deliveries

1 Construction and equipping

of Mapenya maternity bock

6,500,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Digging of shallow

well ,Procurement

To increase safe

water acces to the

2 Digging of Shallow well

Procurement & installation

1,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL


252


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

and installation of

10,000L water tanks

at Pangani and

Poromoko

Dispensaries

facility of 10,000L water tank

Equiping Mkunumbi

,Mapenya & Uziwa

dispensaries

To improve

quality of

services

2 Procurement of equipment 7,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Procurement of

DT175 Yamaha

Motor bikes for

Mkunumbi

,Muhamarani,Mapeny

a and Uziwa

dispensaries

To improve

referral

services(Samples

& client

parameter)

4 Procurement of DT175 2,000,000 CGL 2019-20 CGL

Construction of

Laboaratory at

Mkunumbi

Dispensary

To improve

diagnostic

services

1 Construction of Laborotary

block

7,000,000 National Govt 2018-1 CGL

Hongwe Ward

Construction and

equipping of Bomani

Dispensary and staff

house

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of health

facility & staff house

Procurement of equipment

15,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Equiping Hongwe and

Sinambio

Dispensaries

To improve

quality of

services

2 Procurement of equipment 4,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Construction and

eequiping of Hongwe

dispensary and Staff

house

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of health

facility & staff house

Procurement of equipment

12,000,000 CGL 2019-21 CGL


253


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

Procurement of

DT175 Yamaha

Motor bikes for

Sinambio and

Hongwe dispensaries

To improve

referral

services(Samples

& client

parameter)

2 Procurement of DT175 1,000,000 CGL 2019-20 CGL

Bahari Ward

Equiping Maria

Teresa Nuzo,Tewe

and Mpeketoni Hosp

To improve

quality of

services

2 Procurement of equipment 24,000,000 CGL 2018-21 CGL

Construction of

Rehabilitaion unit at

Mpeketoni Hosp

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of health

facility & staff house

Procurement of equipment

10,000,000 CGL 2018-21 CGL

Construction of

perimeter fence at

Tewe Disp

To improve

security and

protect land from

encroachment

1 Construction of perimeter

wall

2,000,000 CGL 2018-20 CGL

Procurement of 4X4

utility vehicle at

Mpeketoni hospital

To improve

support

supervison and

cordination

1 Procurement of 4x4 utility

vehicle

8,000,000 CGL 2020-21 CGL

Procurement of

ambulance 4x4

vehicle for Mpeketoni

Hospital

To improve

timely referral of

clients

1 Procurement of 4x4

ambulance

10,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Procurement of

DT175 Yamaha

Motor bikes for

Mpeketoni Hospital

and Tewe

dispensaries

To improve

referral

services(Samples

& client

parameter)

2 Procurement of DT175

Yamaha motor bikes

2,000,000 CGL 2019-20 CGL

Renovation of To improve 1 Renovation of Mpeketoni 25,000,000 Equalization fund 2018/19 CGL


254


Project Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

Mpeketoni Hosp

(Phase 2)

infrastructure and

service delivery

Hospital

Procurement of CHVs

tool kit

To increase

access to Primary

health care

services

1 Procurement of CHVs kits 4,000,000 CGL 2019-22 CGL


Project Name/

Location*


Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

Witu Ward

Equiping Witu H/C ,

Moa ,Didedewaride

,Katsaka kairu

,Pandanguo and

Maisha masha

Dispensaries

To improve

quality of

services

6 Procurement of equiments 30,000,000 CGL 2018-22 CGL

Construction of New

dispensary at

Didewaride

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction of Health

facility

6,000,000 National Govt 2018-19 CGL

Procure and instal

10,000L water tank in

Moa ,Katsaka kairu

,Pandanguo and

Maisha masha

dispensaries

To increase acces

to safe water

3 Procurement of 10,000L

water tank &

Installtion

5,000,000 CGL 2019-22 CGL


255


Project Name/

Location*


Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

Procurement of 4X4

utility vehicle at Witu

hospital

To improve

support

supervison and

Disribution of

commodities

1 Procurment of 4X4 utility

vehicle

8,000,000 CGL 2018-19 CGL

Procurement of

DT175 Yamaha

Motor bikes for Witu

H/C ,Moa

,Didewaride ,Katsaka

kairu ,Maisha masha

and Pandanguo

dispensaries

To facilitate

sample referral

and client

parameters

6 Procurement of Yamaha

DT175

3,000,000 CGL 2019-20 CGL

Construction of Staff

houses at Witu H/C

To increase

access to

emergence

services outside

normal working

hours

1 Construction of staff houses 10,000,000 Equalization

fund

2018-19 CGL

Staff quarters at

Moa,Maisha masha

and Katsaka kairu

dispensaries

To increase

access to

emergence

services outside

normal working

hours

2 Construction of staff houses 15,000,000 Equalization

fund

2018-19 CGL

Construction of New

OPD block at Witu

H/C

To improve

health

infrastructure and

service delivery

1 Construction New of OPD

block

20,000,000 CGL 2019-21 CGL


256


Project Name/

Location*


Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost (Kshs.) Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Impleme

nting

Agency

Hindi ward

Construction and

equipping of new

dispensary at Kausara

Disp and staff house

To increase

access to health

care services

1 Construction and equipping

of health fality and staff

house

15,000,000 CGL 2019-21 CGL

Equiping Mokowe

H/C and Baragoni

,Hindi Magogoni

,Hindi GK Prison

Disp

To improve

quality of services

4 Procurement of equipment 40,000,000 CGL 2018-22 CGL

Procure and instal

10,000L water tank at

Mokowe H/C and

Hindi Magogoni

,Baragoni and

Kausara Dispensaries

To improve acces

to safe water

4 Procurement and installation

of 10,000L water tanks

4,000,000 CGL 2019-

2020

CGL

Procurement of

DT175 Yamaha

Motor bikes for Hindi

Magogoni

dispensaries and

Mokowe H/C

To improve

samples referral

and client

parameters

2 Procure Yamaha DT175 1,000,000 CGL 2019-20 CGL


257


Project Name/ Location*


Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implemen

ting

Agency

Mkomani Ward

Equiping Lamu county

Hosp ,Kipungani

,Matondoni

To improve quality

services

3 Procurement of

equipment

40M CGL 2018-22 CGL

Construction of Laboratory

& Maternity at Matondoni

Disp

To improve

diagnostic services

and Skilled birth

deliveries

1 Construction of

Maternity and

Laboratory blocks

8M Equilization

Fund

2018-22 CGL

Construction of Kipungani

Disp

To improve acces to

quality primary

health services

1 Construction of

Health facility

6M Equilization

Fund

2018-22 CGL

Construction of

Rehabilitaion unit at Lamu

county Hosp

To increase to

Rehabilitation

services

1 Construction of

Rehabilitation unit

10M CGL 2018-20 LCG

Procurement of two 4X4

utility vehicle at Lamu

County hospital

To improve support

supervison and

Disribution of

commodities

2 Procure 4x4 utility

vehicle

16M CGL 2018-20 LCG

Procurement of ambulance

4x4 vehicle for Lamu

County Hospital

To improve on

timely referral of

emergency cases

1 Procure 4x4

Ambulance vehicle

10M CGL 2018-22 LCG

Construction of New

Laboratory unit at Lamu

County Hospital

To improve on

diadnostic services

1 Construction of

Laboratory unit

30M CGL 2018-22 LCG

Renovation of Lamu

County Hosp (Phase 2)

To improve health

infrustructure

1 Renovaation of lamu

County hospital

5M CGL 2018-22 LCG

KMTC block at Lamu To increase acces to 1 Construction of 20M Equalization 2018-22 LCG


258


Project Name/ Location*


Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implemen

ting

Agency

county Hospital Pre-service trainimg

to Lamu locals

KMTC block Fund

Furnishing and equipping

of Lamu county Hospital

To improve quality

services

1 Procure equipment 25M Equalization

Fund

2018-22 LCG

Shella Ward

Equiping Shella and Manda

disp

To improve quality

services

2 Procure equipment 4M CGL 2018-22 LCG

,Procurement and

Instalation of 10,000L

water tank at Manda

dispensary

To improve

provision of safe

water

1 Procure and

Installation of

10,000L water tanks

0.3M CGL 2018-20 LCG

Procurement of DT175

Yamaha Motor bikes for

Manad dispensary

To improve

Sample referral and

client parameters

1 Procure Yamaha

DT175

0.5 CGL 2018-20 LCG

Faza Ward

Equiping Faza Hosp

,Kizingitini,Mbwajumwali

,Tchundwa ,Siyu,Pate

,Mtangawanda and Shanga

Disp

To improve access

to quality services

8 Procurement of

equipment

34M CGL 2018-20 LCG

Procurement and

installation of 10,000L

water tank to Faza Hospital

and Kizingitini ,

Mtangawanda

,Mbwajumwali,Tchundwa

,Patte ,Shanga dispensries

To improve acces to

safe water

8 Procurement of

10,000L water tanks

2.1M CGL 2018-19 LCG

Completion of the

Mbwajumwali dispnsary

To increase access

to health services

1 Finishing and

equiping

3M CGL 2018-20 LCG

Procurement of 4X4 utility To improve support 1 Procure 4x4 vehicle 8M CGL 2018-19 LCG


259


Project Name/ Location*


Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implemen

ting

Agency

vehicle at Faza hospital supervison and

Disribution of

commodities

Procurement of an

advanced life Support

ambulance 4x4 vehicle for

Faza Hospital

To improve acces to

referral and

emergency services

1 Procure 4x4

ambulance

10M CGL 2018-19 LCG

Procurement of DT175

Yamaha Motor bikes for

Mahandakini ,Pate

,Siyu,Tchundwa,Mbwajum

wali and Kizingitini

dispensaries

To facilitate sample

referral and clinet

parameters

6 Procurement of

DT175

3M CGL 2019-20 LCG

Staff quarter at Shanga

Dispensary

To increase access

to emergence

services

1 Construction of staff

house

5M Equalization

fund

2018-19 LCG

Staff quarters at Faza

Hospital

To increase access

to emergence

services

1 Construction of staff

house

10M Equalization

fund

2018-19 LCG

Basuba Ward

Equiping of Mangai

,Basuba and Kiangwe Disp

To improve quality

of services

3 Procurement of

equipment

6M CGL 2018-19 LCG

Digging shallow well

,Procurement and

installation of 10,000L

water tank at Kiangwe and

Basuba dispensries

To increase access

to safe water

2 Digging shallow well

Procure 10,000L

water tanks

3M CGL 2017/19 LCG

Procurement of DT175

Yamaha Motor bikes for

Kiangwe ,Basuba and

Mangai dispensaries

To improve sample

referral and client

parameters

3 Procurement of

DT175

1.5 CGL 2019-20 LCG


260


Project Name/ Location*


Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implemen

ting

Agency

Kiunga Ward

Equiping Kiunga H/C and

Kiwayuu, Ndau ,Mkokoni

and Ishakani Disp

To improve quality

of health services

5 To procure equipment 20M CGL 2019-20 LCG

Renovation of staff quarters

and facelift of OPD at

Kiunga H/C

To improve health

infrustructure

1 Renovation of staff

house and OPD block

15,000,00

0

CGL 2019-20 LCG

Procurement and

installation of 10,000L

water tanks at Kiunga H/C

,Mkokoni ,Kiwayuu,Ndau

To improve access

to safe water

4 Procure and

installation of

10,000L water tanks

6,000,000 CGL 2019-20 LCG

Procurement of DT175

Yamaha Motor bikes for

Kiunga H/C and Mkokoni

dispensaries

To improve sample

referral and client

2parameters

Procurement of

DT175

1,000,000 CGL 2019-20 LCG

Construction of VIP latrines

at Kiunga H/C

To improve

sanitation at Kiunga

H/C

1 Construction of VIP

toilets

5,00,000 CGL 2019-20 LCG

Procurement of 4X4 utility

vehicle at Kiunga H/C

To improve acces to

referral and

emergency services

1 Procure 4x4 utility

vehicles

8,000,000 CGL 2019-20 LCG

Construction of Staff

quarters at Ishakani

dispensary

To increase access

to emergence

services

1 Construction of staff

houses

5,000,000 Equilization

fund

2019-20 LCG


261


Sector Name: Social Protection, Culture and Recreation

Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implement

ing Agency

On-going projects

Gender & Social Services

Capacity

building for

women, PWDs

and VMGs

countywide.

To train women,

PWDs and VMGs on

various skills

including but not

limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource mobilization,

30% government

tender rule and group

dynamics.

Women,

PWDs

and

VMGs in

Lamu

County.

Facilitating different

training sessions for

women, PWDs and

VMGs in order to

equip them with

necessary skills that

would make them self-

reliant.

Compliance with

NEMA laws and

regulations e.g

carrying of

plastic bags will

be restricted.

6M 1. Lamu

County

government.

2. Donors.

3.GoK

2018-

2022

Directorate

of Gender

and Social

Services

GBV Program

in Lamu

County.

To train men, women

and school children

on GBV, establish

GBV working groups,

facilitating the

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Men,

women

and

children

in Lamu

County.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage of

GBV cases on local

and social media

Compliance with

NEMA laws and

regulations

6M County

Government

of Lamu

Donors

GoK

2018-

2022

Directorate

of Gender

and Social

Services


262


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

New Project Proposals

Shella Ward
Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Shella ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Shella ward in order

to create employment

and enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a social

hall

5M County

Government of

Lamu

Donors

GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women and

PWDs in

Shella ward.

To train women and

PWDs on various

skills including but

not limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule and group

dynamics.

Women and

PWDs.

Supporting various

trainings to women

and PWDs

400,000 County

Government of

Lamu

Donors

GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

Men, women,

and children in

Shella Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

600,000 County

Government of

Lamu

Donors

GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


263


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Shella ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M County

Government of

Lamu

Donors

GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Mkomani Ward

Construction,

renovation and

furnishing of a

social hall in

Mkomani

ward

1. To construct a

social hall in

Mkomani ward in

order to create

employment and

enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

2.To renovate the

existing social hall in

Matondoni.

Members of

the community

Construction of a new

social hall, renovation

and furnishing of the

existing social hall in

Matondoni.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity
building for

women, PWDs

and VMGs in

Mkomani

ward.

To train women,
PWDs and VMGs in

various skills

including but not

limited to

entrepreneurship,

Men, women,
PWDs and

VMGs in

Mkomani

Ward.

Supporting various
trainings to men,

women, PWDs and

VMGs.

800,000 1.County
Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate
of gender

and social

services


264


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule and group

dynamic

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Men, women,

and children in

Mkomani

Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

600,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Mkomani ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Hindi Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Hindi ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Hindi ward in order

to create employment

and enhance social

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in Hindi

ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


265


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

cohesion and

integration.

Construction

and furnishing

of a children

protection

centre in Hindi

ward.

To construct and

furnish a children

protection centre in

Hindi ward in order

to provide care to

children with special

cases

Children with

special cases

Construction and

furnishing of a

children protection

centre in Hindi ward.

15M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donor

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women, PWDs

and VMGs in

Hindi ward.

To train women,

PWDs and VMGs in

various skills

including but not

limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

Men, women,

PWDs and

VMGs in

Mkomani

Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women, PWDs and

VMGs.

0.8M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not
limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

Men, women,

and children in

Hindi Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV
working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

0.6M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors
3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


266


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Hindi ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Mkunumbi Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Mkunumbi

ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Mkunumbi ward in

order to create

employment and

enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in

Mkunumbi ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women, PWDs

and VMGs in

Hindi ward.

To train women,

PWDs and VMGs in

various skills

including but not

limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

Men, women,

PWDs and

VMGs in

Mkunumbi

Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women, PWDs and

VMGs.

0.8M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

Men, women,

and children in

Facilitating training of

men, women and

0.6M 1.County

Government of

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender


267


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Mkunumbi

Ward.

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

and social

services

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Mkunumbi

ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Bahari Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Bahari ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Bahari ward in order

to create employment

and enhance social
cohesion and

integration.

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in Bahari

ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women and

PWDs in

Bahari ward.

To train women and

PWDs in various

skills including but

not limited to

entrepreneurship,

Men, women

and PWDs in

Bahari Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women and PWDs.

400,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


268


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Men, women,

and children in

Bahari Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

600,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Bahari ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Hongwe Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Hongwe

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Hongwe ward in

order to create

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in Hongwe

ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


269


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

ward employment and

enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

3.GoK

Capacity

building for

women and

PWDs in

Hongwe ward.

To train women and

PWDs in various

skills including but

not limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

Men, women

and PWDs in

Hongwe Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women and PWDs.

400,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Men, women,

and children in

Hongwe Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

600,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

Women groups

and PWDs in

Hongwe ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social


270


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

and PWDs departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

2.Donors

3.GoK

services

Witu Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Witu ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Witu ward in order to

create employment

and enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in Witu

ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women, PWDs

and VMGs in

Witu ward.

To train women,

PWDs and VMGs in

various skills

including but not

limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

Men, women,

PWDs and

VMGs in Witu

Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women, PWDs and

VMGs.

800,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

Men, women,

and children in

Witu Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

600,000 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


271


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Witu ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Basuba Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

in Basuba

ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Basuba ward in order

to create employment

and enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in Basuba

ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women, PWDs

and VMGs in

Basuba ward.

To train women,

PWDs and VMGs in

various skills

including but not

limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

Men, women,

PWDs and

VMGs in

Basuba Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women, PWDs and

VMGs.

0.8M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services


272


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Men, women,

and children in

Basuba Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

0.6M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Basuba ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Kiunga Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall
in Kiunga

ward

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Kiunga ward in order
to create employment

and enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall in Kiunga
ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu
2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social
services

Capacity

building for

women and

To train women and

PWDs in various

skills including but

Men, women

and PWDs in

Kiunga Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women and PWDs.

0.4M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social


273


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

PWDs in

Kiunga ward.

not limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

2.Donors

3.GoK

services

End GBV in

Lamu County

To establish different

strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Men, women,

and children in

Kiunga Ward.

Facilitating training of

men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

0.6M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Kiunga ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

. Faza Ward

Construction

and furnishing

of a social hall

To construct and

furnish a social hall in

Faza ward and

Members of

the community

Construction and

furnishing of a new

social hall and

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social


274


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

in Faza ward renovate existing

social halls in order to

create employment

and enhance social

cohesion and

integration.

renovation of the

existing social halls in

Faza ward.

2.Donors

3.GoK

services

Construction

and furnishing

of a children

protection

centre in Hindi

ward.

To construct and

furnish a children

protection centre in

Hindi ward in order

to provide care to

children with special

cases

Children with

special cases

Construction and

furnishing of a

children protection

centre in Hindi ward.

15M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donor

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Capacity

building for

women and

PWDs in Faza

ward.

To train women and

PWDs in various

skills including but

not limited to

entrepreneurship,

resource

mobilization, 30%

government tender

rule, group dynamic

and GBV.

Men, women

and PWDs in

Faza Ward.

Supporting various

trainings to men,

women and PWDs.

0.4M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

End GBV in
Lamu County

To establish different
strategies on how to

end GBV which

include but not

limited to facilitation

of different training

for men, women and

children on GBV,

Men, women,
and children in

Faza Ward.

Facilitating training of
men, women and

children on GBV,

establishment of GBV

working groups and

facilitating coverage

of GBV cases on local

and social media

0.6M 1.County
Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate
of gender

and social

services


275


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

establishment of

GBV working groups

and facilitating

coverage of GBV

cases on local and

social media.

Issuance of

grants to

women groups

and PWDs

To issue grants to

women and PWDs in

accordance with the

departmental policies

(groups and

individuals)

Women groups

and PWDs in

Faza ward

Annual issuance of

grants to women and

PWDs

10M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

3.GoK

2018-2022 Directorate

of gender

and social

services

Sub Sector Youth Affairs

On-going projects
Capacity

program for

youth

Countywide

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering Lamu

County youth inside

and outside our

county

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

30M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Drugs and

drug abuse

1. To advocate

against drug abuse in

Lamu County and

rehabilitate drug

addicts.

2. To construct a drug

rehabilitation centre

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

advocacy campaigns

against drugs and drug

abuse in Lamu County

as well as construction

of a drug rehabilitation

centre.

42M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

New Project Proposals

Shella Ward

Lamu County To spur socio- Youth groups Disbursement of funds 0.5M 1. County 2018-2022 County


276


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Youth

Development

Fund

economic

development of the

youth

and individuals

in Shella ward.

to youth in Shella

ward.

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Shella ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Shella ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

0.3M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Say No to

Drugs

To advocate against

drug abuse in Shella

ward and rehabilitate

drug addicts

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

advocacy campaigns

against drugs and drug

abuse in Shella ward.

2.4M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Mkomani Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Mkomani

ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Mkomani

ward.

0.5M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Mkomani ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Mkomani

ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

0.3M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Say No to

Drugs

To advocate against

drug abuse in

Mkomani ward and

rehabilitate drug

addicts

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

advocacy campaigns

against drugs and drug

abuse in Mkomani

ward.

2.4M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

. Hindi Ward

Lamu County

Youth

To spur socio-

economic

Youth groups

and individuals

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Hindi

500,000 1. County

Government of

2018-2022 County

Department


277


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Development

Fund

development of the

youth

in Hindi ward. ward. Lamu.

2. Donors

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Hindi ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Hindi ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

300,000 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Say No to

Drugs

1. To advocate

against drug abuse in

Hindi Ward and

rehabilitate drug

addicts

2. To

construct/furnish one

rehabilitation centre

in Hindi ward to

serve affected youth

from the entire

County.

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

advocacy campaigns

against drugs and drug

abuse in Hindi ward;

construction/furnishin

g one rehabilitation

centre in Hindi ward

that will serve all

affected youth in

Lamu County.

17.4M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One sub

county one

resource

centre, Lamu

West

To construct and fully

equip one resource

centre per in Hindi

Ward which will

serve all residents of
Lamu West Sub-

County.

All resident of

Lamu West

Sub-County.

Construction and

furnishing of a youth

resource centre in

Hindi Ward.

15M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Mkunumbi Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Mkunumbi

ward ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Mkunumbi

ward.

0.5M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.


278


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Mkunumbi ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Mkunumbi

ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

0.3M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Bahari Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Bahari ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Bahari

ward.

0.5M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Bahari ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Bahari ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

0.3M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Hongwe Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Hongwe

ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Hongwe

ward.

0.5M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Hongwe ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Hongwe

ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

0.3M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Witu Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Witu ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Witu ward.

0.5M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one To facilitate trainings Youth groups Facilitation of various 0.3M 1. County 2018-2022 County


279


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

skill that aim at

empowering youth in

Witu ward.

and individuals

in Witu ward.

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Basuba Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Basuba

ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Basuba

ward.

0.5M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Basuba ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Basuba

ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

0.3M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Kiunga Ward

Lamu County

Youth

Development

Fund

To spur socio-

economic

development of the

youth

Youth groups

and individuals

in Kiunga

ward.

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Kiunga

ward.

500,000 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Kiunga ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Kiunga

ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

300,000 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Say No to

Drugs

To advocate against

drug abuse in Kiunga

ward and rehabilitate

drug addicts

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

advocacy campaigns

against drugs and drug

abuse in Kiunga ward.

2.4M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Faza Ward

Lamu County

Youth

To spur socio-

economic

Youth groups

and individuals

Disbursement of funds

to youth in Faza ward.

500,000 1. County

Government of

2018-2022 County

Department


280


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Development

Fund

development of the

youth

in Faza ward. Lamu.

2. Donors

of Youth

Affairs.

One youth one

skill

To facilitate trainings

that aim at

empowering youth in

Faza ward.

Youth groups

and individuals

in Faza ward.

Facilitation of various

trainings for youth in

order to equip them

with different skills

based on their needs.

300,000 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Say No to

Drugs

1. To advocate

against drug abuse in

Faza Ward and

rehabilitate drug

addicts

2. To

construct/furnish one

rehabilitation centre

in Faza ward to serve

affected youth from

the entire County.

Youth groups

and

individuals.

Facilitation of various

advocacy campaigns

against drugs and drug

abuse in Faza ward;

construction/furnishin

g one rehabilitation

centre in Faza ward

that will serve all

affected youth in

Lamu County.

17.4M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

One sub

county one

resource

centre, Lamu

East Sub-

County.

To construct and fully

equip one resource

centre per in Faza

Ward which will

serve all residents of

Lamu East Sub-
County.

All resident of

Lamu East

Sub-County.

Construction and

furnishing of a youth

resource centre in

Faza Ward.

15M 1. County

Government of

Lamu.

2. Donors

2018-2022 County

Department

of Youth

Affairs.

Sub sector :sports development

On-going projects

Twaif stadium

in Mkomani

Ward

To complete fencing

and levelling as well

as upgrading the

playing surface

Sports men

and women

Fencing, levelling and

upgrading

10M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports


281


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

Muungano

Stadium n

Bahari Ward

To construct a dias

and levelling

Sports men

and women

Dias construction and

levelling

5M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Lamu Sports

Complex

To make it a

multidiscipline sports

complex

Sports men

and women

Construction of courts

in different disciplines

and levelling

490M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Supporting

ward and

County

tournaments in

all 10 wards

To sponsor local

sports tournaments in

different disciplines

Sports men

and women

Grassroots

tournaments

sponsored

15M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sponsoring

teams for

regional and

national

tournaments

countywide

To sponsor teams and

individuals for

regional and national

tournaments

Sports men

and women

Teams and individuals

sponsored for regional

and national

tournaments

15M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Provision of

sports

equipment

countywide

To purchase and

distribute sports

equipment to sports

teams

Sports men

and women

Sports equipment

purchased and

distrbuted

5M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Training of

sports officials

countywide

To train sports

officials in different

disciplines

Sports men

and women

Sports officials trained

in different sporting

disciplines

4M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Provision of

goal posts and

soccer nets

To provide goal posts

and nets.

Sports men

and women

Goal posts and nets

provided

2M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Supporting

sports

associations

and

To support sports

associations and

federations in their

activities

Sports

associations

and federations

Sports associations

and federations

supported

1M Lamu County

Government

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports


282


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

federations

countywide

New Project Proposals

Shella Ward

One 7-aside

soccer stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of

a 7-aside soccer

pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Beach soccer

stadium

To promote and

develop beach soccer

All people Construction of

beach soccer

stadium

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men and

women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

More sports

for women and

PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage in sports

Women and PWDs Setting up of

women and

PWDs friendly

sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Mkomani Ward

Swimming

pool

To construct a

swimming pool

Professionals

swimmers

Construction of

a swimming

pool

30M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Basketball

court.

To diversify sporting

disciplines

Sports men and

women

Construction of

a basketball

court

500,000 CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

7-aside soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of

a 7-aside soccer

pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Beach soccer

stadium

To promote and

develop beach soccer

All people Construction of

beach soccer

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports


283


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

stadium

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men and

women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

More sports

for women and

PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage n sports

Women and PWDs Setting up of

women and

PWDs friendly

sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

Hindi Ward

Basketball

court.

To diversify sporting

disciplines

Sports men

and women

Construction of a

basketball court

500,000 CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Talent centre To develop sporting

talents in the sub

county

Talented youth Construction of a sport

talent centre

15M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

7-aside soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-

aside soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sports

scholarship

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

More sports

for women and

PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage n sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women

and PWDs friendly

sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Mkunumbi Ward

Basketball To diversify sporting Sports men Construction of a 0.5M CGL 2018-2022 Directorate


284


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementi

ng Agency

court disciplines and women basketball court 2.Donors of sports

Mkunumbi

Stadium

To secure, fence and

level the stadium

Sports men

and women

Securing, fencing and

levelling of the

stadium

5M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

7-aside soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-

aside soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M 1CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

More sports

for women and

PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage in sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women

and PWDs friendly

sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Bahari Ward

Basketball

court

To diversify sporting

disciplines

Sports men

and women

Construction of a

basketball court

0.5M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

7-aside soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-

aside soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

More sports

for women and

PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage in sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women

and PWDs friendly

sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Targets Descrption of

Activities (Key

outputs)

Cost

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implemetin

g Agency

Hongwe Ward


285


Project

Name/Locat

ion

Objectives Targets Descrption of

Activities (Key

outputs)

Cost

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implemetin

g Agency

Hongwe

Stadium.

To secure, fence and

level the stadium

Sports men

and women

Securing, fencing and

levelling of the stadium

5M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

7-aside soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-aside

soccer pitch

3M CGL


2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sports

scholarship

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

More sports

for women

and PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage n sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women and

PWDs friendly sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Witu Ward

Basketball

court

To diversify sporting

disciplines

Sports men

and women

Construction of a

basketball court

500,000 CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Witu Stadium To secure, fence and

level the stadium

Sports men

and women

Securing, fencing and

levelling of the stadium

5M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

7-aside soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-aside

soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports

More sports

for women

and PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage n sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women and

PWDs friendly sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of sports


Project

Name/Loca

tion

Objectives Targets Descrption of

Activities (Key

outputs)

Cost

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implemeting

Agency


286


Project

Name/Loca

tion

Objectives Targets Descrption of

Activities (Key

outputs)

Cost

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implemeting

Agency

Basuba Ward

Levelling and

provision of

goal posts

and nets in 5

villages

To level and provide

goal posts and nets

Sports men

and women

Levelling and provision

of goal posts and nets

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Basuba

Stadium

To secure, fence and

level the stadium

Sports men

and women

Securing, fencing and

levelling of the stadium

5M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

7-aside

soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-

aside soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

More sports

for women

and PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage n sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women

and PWDs friendly

sports

2M 1CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Kiunga Ward

Basketball

court

To diversify sporting

disciplines

Sports men

and women

Construction of a

basketball court

500,000 CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

7-aside

soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in soccer

All people Construction of a 7-

aside soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Beach soccer

stadium

To promote and

develop beach soccer

All people Construction of beach

soccer stadium

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

More sports

for women

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women

and PWDs friendly

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports


287


Project

Name/Loca

tion

Objectives Targets Descrption of

Activities (Key

outputs)

Cost

(KShs)

Source of

Funding

Time Frame Implemeting

Agency

and PWDs engage n sports sports

Faza Ward

Swimming

pool

To construct a

swimming pool

Professionals

swimmers

Construction of a

swimming pool

30M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Basketball

court in

Kizingitini

To diversify sporting

disciplines

Sports men

and women

Construction of a

basketball court

500,000 CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Talent centre To develop sporting

talents in the sub

county

Talented

youth

Construction of a sport

talent centre

15M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

7-aside

soccer

stadium

To encourage more

people to participate

in oosoccer

All people Construction of a 7-

aside soccer pitch

3M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Beach soccer

stadium

To promote and

develop beach soccer

All people Construction of beach

soccer stadium

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

Sports

scholarships

To sponsor talented

athletes to elite sports

academy

Sports men

and women

Setting up sports

scholarship fund

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports

More sports

for women

and PWDs

To encourage more

women and PWDs to

engage n sports

Women and

PWDs

Setting up of women

and PWDs friendly

sports

2M CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

sports


Table 48: Stalled Projects

Project Name Location Description of activities Reasons for stalling

Provision of goal posts, bush

clearing and levelling of stadia

Basuba Ward Bush clearing, levelling and

provision of goal posts to the 5

Insecurity


288


Project Name Location Description of activities Reasons for stalling

in Basuba ward villages of Basuba Ward

Construction of basketball courts Faza, Hindi,

Mkunumbi, Bahari and

Witu Wards

Construction of basketball courts to

diversify sporting disciplines

Low funding

Provision of goal post and nets Shella, Hindi,

Mkunumbi, Bahari and

Hongwe wards

Provision of goal posts and nets to

various sports community stadia

Low funding


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green Economy

considerations

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementi

ng Agency

Culture promotion

On-going projects

Promotion

and

preservation

of cultural

activities

To conserve and

promote culture

through

supporting

cultural & art

festivals,

identification of

cultural sites and

artisans and

holding town

cleanups.

All artisans

in Lamu

County,

cultural,

heritage

sites,

monuments

and the

entire

Lamu

community

Supporting cultural

and arts festivals,

identification of

cultural sites and

artisans, town clean

ups, arts and

cultural centre,

community

museum, Lamu Old

Town Conservation

Plan.

Majority of artisans

in Lamu use the

existing thrown out

materials to make

their living and their

products can wash

away the use of

plastics which have

deleterious effects to

the environment.

225M CGL

2. Donor

3. National

Museums

of Kenya

4. Donors


2018-

2022

1. NMK

2. County

Gov.

3.

Stakeholders

4. Local

community


289


New Project Proposals

Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Shella Ward

Signage of

cultural,

heritage sites

and monuments

To mark cultural/

heritage sites and

monuments in Shella

ward.

All

cultural,

heritage

site and

monuments

Signage of cultural,

heritage sites and

monuments in Shella

ward.

1.67M 1.NMK

2. County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 1CGL

2.NMK


Culture and arts

festivals in

Shella ward.

To support cultural

and art festivals in

Shella ward.

All

resident in

Shella

ward

Supporting culture and

art festivals in Shella

ward.

6.7M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Shella

Cultural

Promotion

Group

4.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Shella

Cultural

Promotion

Group

Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Shella ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

All

resident in

Shella

ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Shella

Cultural

Promotion

Group

4.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Shella

Cultural

Promotion

Group


290


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Traditional

herbalists,

Shella ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Shella ward.

Shella

Traditional

Herbalists

Registering Shella

Traditional Herbalists

0.1M County

Government of

Lamu.

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Shella

Cultural

Promotion

Group

Mkomani Ward

Arts and

Cultural Centre

To construct and

equip arts and

cultural centre in

Mkomani ward

where local and

international tourists

can enjoy and learn

different cultures

that exist in Lamu

County.

All types

of arts and

cultures in

Lamu

County.

Construction of arts

and cultural centre in

Mkomani ward that

will attract tourists

who can come and

learn different cultures

of Lamu people.

15M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2. NMK

3. Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2. NMK

Signage of

cultural,

heritage sites

and monuments

in Mkomani

ward

To mark old town

streets, cultural/

heritage sites and

monuments in

Mkomani ward.

All streets

of the

world

heritage

site and

monuments

in

Mkomani

wards.

Signage of streets in

Lamu town, cultural,

heritage sites and

monuments in

Mkomani ward.

1.7M 1.NMK

CGL

2.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK


Culture and arts

festivals in

Mkomani ward.

To support cultural

and art festivals in

Mkomani ward.

All

resident in

Mkomani

Supporting culture and

art festivals in

Mkomani ward.

30M CGL

2.NMK

3. Lamu

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Lamu Cultural


291


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

ward Cultural

Promotion

Group

4.Donors

Promotion

Group


Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Mkomani ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

All

resident in

Mkomani

ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M 1. County CGL

2.NMK

3. Lamu

Cultural

Promotion

Group

4.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Lamu Cultural

Promotion

Group


Traditional

herbalists,

Mkomani ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Mkomani ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in

Mkomani

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Mkomani ward.

0.1M CGL 2018-2022 CGL and Lamu

Traditional

Herbalists

Hindi Ward

Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Hindi ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

All

resident in

Hindi ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M CGL

2.NMK

4.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Local

community


292


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

their talents.

Traditional

herbalists,

Hindi ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Hindi ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in Hindi

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Hindi ward.

0.1M CGL 2018-2022 CGL and Hindi

Traditional

Herbalists

Mkunumbi Ward

Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Mkunumbi

ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

All

resident in

Mkunumbi

ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

4.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Local

community


Traditional

herbalists,

Mkunumbi

ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Mkunumbi ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in

Mkunumbi

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Mkunumbi ward.

0.1M County

Government of

Lamu.

2018-2022 CGL and

Mkunumbi

Traditional

Herbalists

Bahari Ward

Signage of

cultural,
heritage sites

and monuments

in Bahari ward

To mark cultural/

heritage sites and
monuments in

Bahari ward.

All

heritage
site and

monuments

in Bahari

wards.

Signage of cultural,

heritage sites and
monuments in Bahari

ward.

1.67M 1. NMK

CGL
2.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2. NMK


293


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Bahari ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

All

resident in

Bahari

ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M CGL

2.NMK

4.Donors

2018-2022 CGL

2.NMK

3. Local

community


Traditional

herbalists,

Bahari ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Bahari ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in Bahari

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Bahari ward.

0.1M CGL 2018-2022 CGL

Traditional

Herbalists in

Bahari ward

Hongwe Ward

Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Hongwe ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

All

resident in

Hongwe

ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

4.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Local

community


Traditional

herbalists,

Hongwe ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Hongwe ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in Hongwe

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Hongwe ward.

0.1M County

Government of

Lamu.

2018-2022 CGL and

Traditional

Herbalists in

Hongwe ward


294


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Witu Ward

Signage of

cultural,

heritage sites

and monuments

in Witu ward

To mark cultural/

heritage sites and

monuments in Witu

ward.

All

heritage

site and

monuments

in Witu

wards.

Signage of cultural,

heritage sites and

monuments in Witu

ward.

1.67M 1. NMK

2. County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2. NMK


Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

Witu ward.

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

All

resident in

Witu ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

2.9M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

4.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Local

community


Traditional

herbalists, Witu

ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Witu ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in Witu

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Witu ward.

0.1M County

Government of

Lamu.

2018-2022 County

Government of

Lamu and

Traditional

Herbalists in

Witu ward

Basuba Ward

Establishment

of talent shows

and cultural

competitions in

To establish talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

All

resident in

Basuba

ward

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

competitions and

traditional games

2.9M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK


295


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

Basuba ward. competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

4.Donors 3. Local

community


Traditional

herbalists,

Basuba ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Basuba ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in Basuba

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Basuba ward.

0.1M County

Government of

Lamu.

2018-2022 County

Government of

Lamu and

Traditional

Herbalists in

Basuba ward

Kiunga Ward

Signage of

cultural,

heritage sites

and monuments

in Kiunga ward

To mark cultural/

heritage sites and

monuments in

Kiunga ward.

All

heritage

site and

monuments

in Kiunga

wards.

Signage of cultural,

heritage sites and

monuments in Kiunga

ward.

1.67M 1. NMK

2. County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2. NMK


Culture and arts

festivals in

Kiunga ward.

To support cultural

and art festivals in

Kiunga ward.

All

resident in

Kiunga

ward

Supporting culture and

art festivals in Kiunga

ward.

6.7M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Kiunga

Cultural

Promotion

Group

Establishment

of talent shows

To establish talent

shows, cultural

All

resident in

Establishment of talent

shows, cultural

2.9M 1. County

Government of

2018-2022 1. County

Government of


296


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Ksh)

Source of

funding

Timeframe Implementing

Agency

and cultural

competitions in

Kiunga ward.

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in

order to identify

people with art

talents and train

them to develop

their talents.

Kiunga

ward

competitions and

traditional games

competitions in order

to identify people with

art talents and train

them to develop their

talents.

Lamu

2.NMK

4.Donors

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Local

community

Traditional

herbalists,

Kiunga ward.

To register

traditional herbalists

in Kiunga ward.

Traditional

Herbalists

in Kiunga

ward.

Registering

Traditional Herbalists

in Kiunga ward.

0.1M County

Government of

Lamu.

2018-2022 County

Government of

Lamu and

Traditional

Herbalists in

Kiunga ward

Faza Ward

Signage of

cultural,

heritage sites

and monuments

in Faza ward

To mark cultural/

heritage sites and

monuments in Faza

ward.

All

heritage

site and

monuments

in Faza

wards.

Signage of cultural,

heritage sites and

monuments in Faza

ward.

1.67M 1. NMK

2. County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2. NMK


Culture and arts

festivals in

Faza ward.

To support cultural

and art festivals in

Faza ward.

All

resident in

Faza ward

Supporting culture and

art festivals in Faza

ward.

6.7M 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3.Donors

2018-2022 1. County

Government of

Lamu

2.NMK

3. Cultural

Promotion

Groups in Faza

ward.


297


298


Table 49: Stalled Projects/programmes

Project Name Location Description of activities Reasons for stalling

Issuance of grants. Countywide Issuance of grants to women and

persons with disabilities.

Lack of legal framework to support the

issuance of grants.


Sector Name: EDUCATION

Programme Name: ECDE, Vocational Training and Primary, Secondary & Tertiary Education.


On-going projects


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

School

feeding

programme

(SFP),

Hindi,

Basuba and

Hongwe

wards.

To establish

a sustainable

SFP for

students’

retention and

improved

school

performance

Students at

Arid Zone

Primary

Schoo,

Mokowe

Special

School in

Hindi ward,

all ECDE

classes in

Basuba ward

and Elshadai

Special Unit

Supporting school

feeding at Mokowe

Special School, Arid

Zone Primary School

in Hindi ward, all

ECDE centres in

Basuba ward and

Elshadai Special Unit

in Hongwe ward.

Compliance

with NEMA

regulations

1.5M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education


299


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

in Hongwe

ward

Achievers’

Academy

To facilitate

the

improvement

of school

performance

in Lamu

County by

supporting

achievers’

academy.

All Top 3

students

from both

primary and

secondary

schools.

Selecting top 3

students in all primary

and secondary schools

and putting them in a

good learning

environment where

they interact with

different educationists

who assist them in

how to answer exam

questions, how exams

are marked, how to

maintain their grades

and other important

issues that are

expected to improve

their performance.

Compliance

with NEMA

regulations

5M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education

Bursaries

and

scholarships

in all 10

wards.

To provide

bursaries and

scholarships

to all

secondary,

colleges and

universities’

students from

Lamu

County.

All students

from Lamu

County who

are pursuing

their studies

at secondary

schools,

colleges or

universities

anywhere in

the world.

Provision of bursaries

and scholarships to all

students from Lamu

County who are in

secondary schools,

colleges and

universities within or

outside the country.

Compliance

with NEMA

regulations

500M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education.

Training of To improve All Sponsoring at least 2 - 20M 1.County 2018- Directorate of


300


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

examiners,

all 10

wards.

school

performance.

secondary

and primary

schools’

teachers in

Lamu

County.

teachers per school to

attend training on how

to set and mark exams

for better academic

performance.

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2022 Education

Common

exams

To assess

and motivate

schools to

improve

school

academic

performance

in Lamu

County.

All schools

in Lamu

County.

Printing and providing

exam papers for class

7, class 8, form 3 and

form 4 students in all

schools in Lamu

County.

- 5M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education

Rewarding

of quality

grades/prize

giving

To motivate

teachers and

students for

better

academic

performance.

All teachers

who score

B+ and

above in

Lamu

County. All

best

performing

students.

Rewarding teachers

who score A (plain)

with Ksh. 1000, A-

(minus) with Ksh. 750

and B+ with Ksh. 500.

Prize giving for best

performing students.

- 15M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education

Provision of

learning and

teaching

resources to

schools.

To provide

learning and

teaching

resources to

schools in

order to

increase

ECDE

centres/class

es,

vocational

training

centres,

primary

Provision of learning

and teaching

resources for ECDE

centres/classes,

vocational training

centres, primary and

secondary schools.

- 25M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education


301


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

chances for

performance

improvement

.

schools and

secondary

schools.

Pandanguo

ECDE

centre, Witu

ward.

To provide

quality

ECDE

education in

Pandanguo

village in

Witu ward.

Pupils from

Pandanguo

Village

Construction of

Pandanguo ECDE

centre, Witu ward

Compliance

with NEMA

regulations.

3M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education

Pate

Secondary

School

Laboratory

To support

school

infrastructure

development

for better

academic

performance

Pate

Secondary

School

Construction of a

laboratory at Pate

Secondary School.

Compliance

with NEMA

regulations.

6M 1.County

Government

of Lamu

2.Donors

2018-

2022

Directorate of

Education


New Project Proposed

Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefram

e

Implementi

ng Agency

Shella Ward

School

Infrastructure

development

in Shella

ward.

To construct and equip

ECDE centres/classes,

set up a school library

and support construction

and rehabilitation of

All ECDE

centres,

primary and

secondary

schools in

Construction and furnishing

of ECDE centres in Shella

ward that will satisfy pupils

especially from with no

access to ECDE education;

17M 1.County

Governme

nt of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of Education


302


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefram

e

Implementi

ng Agency

existing primary and

secondary schools in

Shella ward

Shella ward. setting up of a school library

and supporting construction

and rehabilitation of primary

and secondary schools in the

same ward.

Education for

all (Bursaries

and

scholarships in

Shella ward).

To provide bursaries and

scholarships to all

secondary, colleges and

universities’ students

from Shella ward, Lamu

County.

All students

from Shella

ward, Lamu

County.

Provision of bursaries and

scholarships to all students

from Shella ward who are in

secondary schools, colleges

and universities within or

outside the country.

50M 1.County

Governme

nt of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of Education

Kick hunger

out of school

(school

feeding

programme

SFP)

To establish a

sustainable SFP for

students’ retention and

improved school

performance

Schools in

areas which

are heavily

affected by

poor living

standards

e.g Manda

and Kihobe.

Supporting school feeding in

selected schools in Shella

ward.

5M 1.County

Governme

nt of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of Education

Education

improvement.

(1.Provision

of teaching

and learning
resources

2. Enhance

performance

through:

a) Training of

examiners

b) Common

1.To support ECDE

centres/classes, primary,

secondary schools and

non formal education

sector with qualified
staff, teaching and

learning resources

2. To enhance

performance through

training of examiners,

provision of common

exams, rewarding of

ECDE

centres,

primary and

secondary

schools in
Shella ward.

Supporting ECDE, primary,

secondary schools and non

formal education sector with

qualified staff, teaching and

learning resources;
enhancing school

performance through

training of examiners,

provision of common exams,

rewarding of quality grades

and achievers academy;

facilitation of motivational

11M 1.County

Governme

nt of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of Education


303


Project

Name/

Location

Objectives Targets Description of Activities

(Key Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefram

e

Implementi

ng Agency

exams to

schools.

c) Quality

grades

d) Achievers’

academy

3.

Motivational

and career

talks)

quality grades and

achievers academy.

3. T o facilitate

motivational talks,

career fair and other

programmes that can

improve students’

performance.

talks, career fair and other

programmes that will

improve students’ overall

performance.


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

Mkomani Ward

Infrastructu

re

developmen

t (ECDE

centre/class,

TVETs,

Primary and

Secondary

Schools).

To construct

and

rehabilitate

ECDE

centres,

TVET

workshops,

primary and

secondary

schools and

setting up of a

library in the

existing

primary or

secondary

ECDE

centres,

TVET

workshops

and other

schools.

Construction and

furnishing of ECDE

centres and TVETs in

Mkomani ward, setting

up of a school library

and supporting

infrastructure

development of

primary and secondary

schools.

27M 1.County

Governm

ent of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of

Education


304


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

school.

Education

for all

(Bursaries

and

scholarships

in Mkomani

ward).

To provide

bursaries and

scholarships

to all

secondary,

colleges and

universities’

students from

Mkomani

ward, Lamu

County.

All students

from

Mkomani

ward, Lamu

County.

Provision of bursaries

and scholarships to all

students from

Mkomani ward who

are in secondary

schools, colleges and

universities within or

outside the country.

50M 1.County

Governm

ent of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of

Education


Kick

hunger out

of school

(school

feeding

programme

SFP)

To establish a

sustainable

SFP for

students’

retention and

improved

school

performance

Students in

areas which

are heavily

affected by

poor living

standards in

Mkomani

ward e.g

Kipungani,

Konge, etc.

Supporting school

feeding in selected

schools in Mkomani

ward.

5M 1.County

Governm

ent of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of

Education


Education

improveme
nt.

(1.Provision

of teaching

and

learning

resources

2. Enhance

1.To support

ECDE
centres/classe

s, primary,

secondary

schools and

non formal

education

sector with

ECDE

centres,
primary

schools,

secondary

schools and

Lamu

vocational

Training

Supporting ECDE,

primary, secondary
schools and non formal

education sector with

qualified staff, teaching

and learning resources;

enhancing school

performance through

training of examiners,

21M 1.County

Governm
ent of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate

of
Education


305


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

performanc

e through:

a) Training

of

examiners

b) Common

exams to

schools.

c) Quality

grades

d)

Achievers’

academy

3.

Capitation

in TEVETs

4.

Motivationa

l talks,

career fair

and other

programme

s that can

improve

students’

overall

performanc

e.)

qualified

staff, teaching

and learning

resources

2. To enhance

performance

through

training of

examiners,

provision of

common

exams,

rewarding of

quality grades

and achievers

academy.

3. To

introduce

capitation in

Lamu

Vocational

Training

Centre this

will facilitate

the

introduction

of more

courses and

the increase in

the rate of

enrolment of

Centre. provision of common

exams, rewarding of

quality grades and

achievers academy;

introduction of

capitation in Lamu

Vocational Training

Centre this will

facilitate the

introduction of more

courses and the

increase in the rate of

enrolment of trainees

in the Lamu TVET;

facilitation of

motivational talks,

career fair and other

program that can

improve students’

overall performance.


306


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Green

Economy

considerations

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source

of

funding

Timefra

me

Implementin

g Agency

trainees in the

Lamu TVET.

4. To

facilitate

motivational

talks, career

fair and other

program that

can improve

students’

overall

performance.


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of funding Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

. Hindi Ward

Infrastructu

re

developmen

t (Mokowe

Vocational

Traing

Centre

(TVET),

ECDE

centres/clas

ses,

Primary

and

To construct

and

rehabilitate

ECDE

centres,

TVET

workshops,

primary&

secondary

schools

infrastructure

and setting

up of a

ECDE

centres,

primary&

secondary

schools

(formal or

non formal)

Construction and

furnishing of ECDE

centres and TVET

workshops in Hindi

ward, setting up a

school library and

supporting

infrastructure

development of

primary and secondary

schools.

27M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

Education


307


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of funding Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

Secondary

Schools

(both

formal and

non- formal

education

sector)).

school

library

within an

existing

primary or

secondary

school

Education

for all

(Bursaries

and

scholarship

s in Hindi

ward).

To provide

bursaries and

scholarships

to all

secondary,

colleges and

universities’

students

from Hindi

ward, Lamu

County.

All students

from Hindi

ward, Lamu

County.

Provision of bursaries

and scholarships to all

students from Hindi

ward who are in

secondary schools,

colleges and

universities within or

outside the country.

50M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

Education

Kick

hunger out

of school

(school

feeding

programme

SFP)

To establish

a sustainable

SFP for

students’

retention and

improved

school

performance

Students in

areas which

are heavily

affected by

poor living

standards in

Hindi ward.

Supporting school

feeding in selected

schools in Hindi ward.

5M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

Education

Education

improveme

nt.

(1.Provisio

n of

1.To support

ECDE

centres/class

es, primary

and

ECDE

centres,

primary

schools,

secondary

Supporting ECDE,

primary and secondary

schools with qualified

staff, teaching and

learning resources;

21M 1.County

Government of

Lamu

2.Donors

2018-2022 Directorate of

Education


308


Project

Name/

Location*

Objectives Targets Description of

Activities (Key

Outputs)

Cost

(Kshs.)

Source of funding Timefra

me

Implementing

Agency

teaching

and

learning

resources

2. Enhance

performanc

e through:

a) Training

of

examiners

b) Common

exams to

schools.

c) Quality

grades

d)

Achievers’

academy

3.

Capitation

in TEVETs

4. <